Ivanka Trump Claimed To Love Phish And McDonald’s, According to 1996 Interview

first_imgIn 1996, People Magazine ran a story about then-14-year-old Ivanka Trump, who at that time gaining exposure from some modeling gigs–as well as the fact that she was the daughter of well-known businessman Donald Trump. While most people only know the Ivanka they saw on the campaign trail with her father last year, the ’96 interview gives us some amusing glimpses into who she was as a child.According to the article, written by Michelle Green, “When she isn’t modeling, Ivanka spends time as her schoolmates do—waking up at ‘a horrible hour, 7 o’clock,’ she says, jumping into her uniform (pleated skirt, white shirt) and cabbing to Chapin. Back at 5, she does homework in her bedroom (with its canopied bed adorned with a pillow that says, “When a Woman Is Tired of the Plaza, She Is Tired of Life”), phones friends and watches Beverly Hills, 90210. She snaps up CDs by Phish and pigs out with pals at McDonald’s. “I’m a big eater,” she says. “After all, I am 14.”Yep, you read that right. Among the details one might expect to hear about a young heiress, we find out that young Ivanka was a Phish fan. Or, at least, she was enough of a fan to mention it to People.Whether or not Ivanka is still into the band is unknown, but now that we’re aware of her early fandom, we’ll be keeping an eye out for her at the Phish’s Baker’s Dozen run at Madison Square Garden this summer.[via People, 1996]last_img read more

CAES Fulbright Scholar

first_imgUGA agricultural and environmental lawyer Terence Centner is in Europe’s oil and gas production capital this spring to study how regulations on hydraulic fracturing affect both the environment and energy companies. Centner, a professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, will work with faculty at the Centre for Energy Law at the University of Aberdeen on a project examining regulatory options for minimizing environmental damage from hydraulic fracturing activities to properties, populations and the environment. “I hope that our research on regulatory options to safeguard people and the environment can be used all over the world in improving environmental quality associated with the development of energy reserves,” Centner said. Centner has spent 30 years at CAES studying the intersection of environmental policies and environmental outcomes in agricultural and natural resource conservation settings. Centner’s work is being funded by the Core Fulbright Scholar Program, which provides teaching and research grants to U.S. faculty in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. In 2015, five scholars from UGA received Core Fulbright awards, making UGA one of the top producing research institutions of Fulbright scholars. The University of Aberdeen, perched on the coast of the energy-rich North Sea in Scotland, is home to some of the most noted energy law research in Europe. In addition to collaborating with other energy law scholars, Centner hopes to learn more about European attitudes towards and academic perspectives on gas and oil drilling regulation. He will also serve as a visiting professor at the University of Aberdeen, teaching a course on environmental concerns in energy production for the Masters of Law (LLM) program in energy law. The class he is teaching contains students from nine countries on five continents. This will create a diverse learning environment. Centner is excited to bring back new perspectives to his students here at UGA. “These experiences will allow me to share European perspectives of environmental regulation of potentially damaging activities in my classes at UGA,” he said. For Centner, this Fulbright Award is his second. In 2002, he was named a Fulbright Senior Fellow and worked at the University of Mannheim in Germany where he taught environmental law and commenced writing his book “Blame Culture.” Centner has also given seminars at Aarhus University in Denmark and the University College of Dublin in Ireland, and he has been invited to five additional universities. He will also give a Gresham College lecture on “Managing Risks Related to Hydraulic Fracturing” at the Museum of London during his time abroad. Centner has a bachelor’s of science with distinction from Cornell University, a juris doctor from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a legum magister from the University of Arkansas.last_img read more

Zagreb Advent Run gathered more than 3000 participants

first_img “Zagreb Advent Run was created on the idea of ​​Advent gifts and socializing with loved ones during the holidays. Together with our partners from the company Run Croatia, we made something completely different – a cheerful pre-holiday gathering that has a noble note. ” said Mario Petrovic, CEO of Millennium Promotion and race organizer. Organized by Millennium Promotion and Run Croatia, runners ran through the center of Zagreb on two routes – 5 and 10 kilometers, and 5 kilometers were joined by walkers. As in previous years, the Zagreb Advent Run, in line with the holiday spirit of giving, also had a humanitarian note. This year’s goal was to raise awareness of the importance of year-round responsible behavior in the sun, and part of the proceeds from the race registration fees this year will be donated to the association Healthy under the Sun.  The fastest male runner was Sylvia Thomas, and he ran 5 kilometers in 15:14. In the women’s competition, the winner was Tea Faber, who ran the same route in 18:10. The fastest time at 10 kilometers – 32:57 was Blaž Car Pavlić. Among the runners, the fastest was Mirjana Šimek Bilić with a time of 38:24. Vjekoslav Klarić was the fastest Nordic walker who crossed the route in 30:25, while Marija Žinić had the best time – 35:02 in the women’s competition. Zagreb Advent Run is the only sporting event within the Advent event in Zagreb, as well as an extension of the event that creates great added value.  On Sunday morning, the holiday-decorated center of Zagreb became even more colorful for over 3000 red caps, or more precisely 3150 runners from as many as 34 countries, who were attracted by the Zagreb Advent Run for the fourth time. Melanoma, one of the most aggressive tumors, affects more than two people in Croatia every day. Therefore, it is imperative to encourage citizens to act conscientiously and preventively when it comes to skin health because, despite modern advances in treatment, prevention and early detection of the disease is still crucial for positive prognosis of treatment and thus the lives of patients. Thus, the city of Zagreb has positioned itself as a destination with one of the largest Advent races in this part of Europe, and it is interesting that the race is the only sporting event within the Zagreb Advent.  Considering the number of participants and the visibility of the race, the Zagreb Advent Run is well on its way to becoming one of the most massive races in Europe. Thus, ZAR contributes to the visibility and promotion of the entire Zagreb Advent.  “Zagreb Advent Run is a great motive for many tourists to come to Zagreb and create some beautiful, new memories. Over 3150 runners from as many as 34 countries have registered, and we are especially pleased to register from overseas countries. “, said Berislav Sokač, founder of Run Croatia and organizer of the race. ZDR is another proof of how running can be and is certainly one of the motives for coming, as well as a great tool on how to extend the tourist season. The goal of the donation is for the association to cover the costs of organizing free preventive examinations in areas where there is a deficit of dermatologists. Also, all runners could apply for free preventive moles examinations, where prevention was directly affected. Photo: PRlast_img read more

Character cottage renovated to delight

first_imgThe home at 57 Kadumba St, Yeronga is on the marketA CHARACTER cottage with swimming pool is new to the market in Yeronga. Cate Spence bought the property at 57 Kadumba St 11 years ago after falling in love with the VJ walls, high ceilings and “beautiful” fretwork. “I just love old Queenslanders and homes with character,” she said. In the time she has owned the property, Ms Spence has renovated the bathrooms, removed a wall between the kitchen and lounge room, revamped the kitchen and repainted the home, all while retaining the heritage charm. The kitchen opens to the living area.“I also added a deck out the back and removed all the palm trees that were in the yard and replaced them with natives,” she said. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The four-bedroom cottage has polished timber floors, a front balcony and double lockup garage. The dine-in kitchen has bi-fold windows that open to the back deck and a storage area off the kitchen has been turned into a walk-in pantry. The lounge room has built-in bookcases and there is a dressing room off the master bedroom that could be converted into an ensuite. The back deck is shaded by native trees.Ms Spence is selling to relocate but she said she would miss her fabulous neighbours.“The house is in such a great area and it’s so close to the city,” she said. The home is being marketed by Sharon and Kate Wilson from McGrath Annerley Yeronga for offers over $735,000.center_img The lounger room has built-in bookcasesDownstairs is a self-contained area with a bedroom, which needs council approval, a living area, kitchenette and bathroom. Outside, the yard is fully enclosed and there is a fenced, above-ground pool. Ms Spence said her favourite space inside the home was the open living area and kitchen while the deck was her “go to place” in the summer. “It’s very private because of the beautiful trees, and it faces north, so it gets lots of lovely breezes,” she said. last_img read more

Russia prepares for World Cup drone attack

first_imgRussia has been hit by a string of suicide bombings since winning the right to host the world’s most watched event in 2010.Some have been blamed on militants from the north Caucasus with ties to the Islamic State group in Syria.Russia’s military bases in the war-ravaged Middle East nation have also been targeted by deadly drone attacks this year.The possibility of someone using the increasingly ubiquitous devices to drop a bomb on a stadium is one Russia’s defence ministry is not taking lightly.Moscow’s RBK news site said army chief Valery Gerasimov issued orders in February to set up jamming stations outside the 12 stadiums that would make remotely operating a drone impossible.A source in the Russian defence ministry told RBK that some of the units are still classified as top secret and only available to the FSB security service.Others have reportedly been set up in Syria and spotted in east Ukraine by European monitors of the four-year conflict between Kiev forces and Russian-backed separatists.“Drones are an effective way to deliver two or three kilogrammes (one or two pounds) of TNT, land them on a target and detonate them,” former anti-terror officer Alexei Filatov told RBK.Russia has set up dozens of no-flight zones and other air space restrictions for the coming months.These cover not only the stadiums and 11 host cities but also training grounds and hotels that will be used by the 32 participating national teams.The transportation ministry has identified 41 locations around which all types of flights — from drones to planes — are prohibited.These stretch from anywhere between 500 metres (500 yards) and 10 kilometres (six miles).But operating a drone will be illegal within around 100 kilometres of any of the 11 host cities.Drone flights over Moscow are permanently banned.Russian state media have been issuing regular reporters in recent months of state security services conducting raids that led to the capture of alleged terror masterminds.President Vladimir Putin also took the unusual step in December of personally thanking US counterpart Donald Trump for providing intelligence that helped avert the bombing of a major cathedral in Saint Petersburg.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000The Luzhniki stadium in Moscow will host the opening match and the final of the 2018 World Cup © AFP/File / Dmitry SEREBRYAKOVMOSCOW, Russian Federation, May 21 – Russia will reportedly deploy jamming devices used in Syria and the war in Ukraine to defend World Cup stadiums against a drone attack.The threat of terror has been a prime concern for organisers of the June 14 to July 15 football showpiece.last_img read more