The Hunt Museum launches a competition to create a sculpture from…

first_imgTwitter Facebook Email For the new Museum in a Garden, the public voted to have the remaining tree trunk of the diseased Chestnut turned into a sculpture.  Ideally the sculpture will reflect objects in the museum.   It could also be a climbable structure. A small collection can be seen above/belowThe Hunt Museum in a Garden is currently being landscaped as a new public space for Limerick, running down to the River Shannon from our 18th century Georgian Palladian Custom House.The landscaping mixes the concepts of the tidal estuary and eclectic objects in the museum.  It includes spaces for a Community & Sensory Garden and the Cobbles and Benches from our Fund a Cobble campaign.It has plenty of seating, a garden chess set, boules and ‘hills’ to roll down. Conceived as an extension to the museum, there are seven sculpture plinths in situ surrounded by planting that express the proposed sculpture’s origins.The technologies of 3D scanning and 3D printing are being used to reproduce large scale replicas of artefacts within the museum, “hidden” in the collection cases.  The first is Olmec Man. See images below.The Tree Trunk sculpture should complement the garden and other proposed sculptures.The winning artist will receive up to a maximum of €4000 in prize money, depending on the judges assessment, and attend the launch of the Museum in a Garden on June 24, at 6pm, and to complete the work over this Summer.Entries are to be submitted by Friday 28 May 2021 5pm. Entries should consist of a completed form and some pictures/drawings of your ideas.For Further information and images: [email protected] Museum in a Garden – Hunt Museum RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSHunt MuseumKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostMuseum in a Garden Linkedin NewsThe Hunt Museum launches a competition to create a sculpture from the Chestnut tree stump for the new Museum in a GardenBy Meghann Scully – May 5, 2021 108 Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WhatsApp Advertisement Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash THE Hunt Museum launches a cash prize competition to create a sculpture from the Chestnut tree stump for the new Museum in a Garden.  The sculpting should take place over the Summer of 2021. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Print Hunt Museum – www.huntmuseum.com Previous articleHamsandwicH are coming to LimerickNext articleGardaí awaiting statement of complaint after Councillor alleges she was sent unsolicited sexual image via social media app Meghann Scully WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener last_img read more

Firms attack plan to let parents work part time

first_img Comments are closed. Firms attack plan to let parents work part timeOn 12 Dec 2000 in Personnel Today Main proposals from Green Paper·       Two weeks’ paid paternity leave for fathers·       Any increase on existing unpaid maternity leave will beshared equally between the mother and father ·       The flat rate of maternity pay – currently £60.20 perweek – will be increased·       Fathers will have the right to work reduced hours untilthe end of maternity leave·       Both parents will be able to opt to work reduced hoursfor as long as they wish, when the maternity period endsBy Kathy Watson Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img Related posts:No related photos. Employers have dismissed proposals outlined by theGovernment last week to offer all parents the option of part-time working.Ministers suggest in a Green Paper that both parents shouldhave the right to work reduced hours for as long as they wish when thematernity period ends.The Green Paper is the Government’s bid to bring rights forworking parents up to date. It follows a major review of work and parents thisyear.The CBI’s deputy director-general, John Cridland, claimedthat the proposals on part-time working were unworkable and warned they wouldlead to “more people going to tribunals to thrash out what they can and cannotdo”.His comments echo the concerns businesses have over this keyelement of the Green Paper. In the sectors where employees work long hours,legal firms, banks and consultancies were united in their rejection of theseproposals.Nomura International’s HR director, Ian Davidson, saidallowing staff to go part-time would have a big impact. He said: “This isuncharted territory and we would have to think carefully how to respond to anemployee wanting to work part-time.”  The Government is proposing a “harm test” in the GreenPaper, which would permit employers the right to refuse a request to workreduced hours if it would harm the business. Trade and Industry SecretaryStephen Byers was unwilling to comment on its format, saying that was part ofthe consultation. “Whether it survives, who knows?” he said. The Green Paper suggests that there will be significant costimplications for employers. But Byers was unrepentant. He said: “The rightpolicies will not only support parents but also enable business to recruit andretain skilled staff, thereby increasing productivity.”A cautious welcome to the proposals was given by ArthurAndersen partner and head of the human capital services practice MichaelStanley. “Although the long-term implications are expensive, it all comes downto market demand and the war for talent,” he said. The deadline for comments on the consultation paper, Workand Parents: Competitiveness and Choice, ends on 7 March.last_img read more

Australia players, board edge closer to pay deal

first_imgMELBOURNE Australia (Reuters) – Cricket Australia is on the verge of agreeing a new pay deal with the players’ union, ending a long impasse and avoiding the need for arbitration.A Cricket Australia spokesman said yesterday that negotiations had advanced to the “final details” after days of lengthy talks with the Australian Cricketers’ Association.News Ltd media on Tuesday declared a “peace deal brokered” and the “Ashes saved”, a reference to the upcoming Test series against England.But talks continued to grind on into yesterday.Australia’s top 230 players have effectively been unemployed since the last five-year agreement expired on June 30 and an ‘A’ tour of South Africa has already fallen victim to the lockout.Australia captain Steve Smith told Fox Sports TV on Tuesday he was confident of a deal being brokered, but confirmed players would not travel to Bangladesh for a two-Test tour starting this month until the dispute was resolved.CA chief executive James Sutherland had proposed taking the matter to binding arbitration if a deal was not struck by early this week.last_img read more

John leads 19 South East golfers to chase their dream

first_img Nineteen South East golfers are one step closer to playing with a star of the European Tour after qualifying for the national final of Bridgestone’s Chase Your Dream Trophy, run in partnership with England Golf. They came through the regional qualifier at Sonning Golf Club, near Reading, where John Green (pictured) led from start to finish with a net score of 65. Green, from the Royal Household Golf Club, based at Windsor Castle, was in the first group out and set the target. By the end of a long, hot day he’d been caught by Neill Jonas (Tilgate Forest, Sussex) who also shot net 65, but no-one had passed him. The pair now go forward to the final in England Golf Week at Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, in August, together with James Sleigh (East Herts), James Goh (Tilgate Forest, Sussex), Dean Penfold (Army, Hampshire), Josh Maguire (Fulwell, Middlesex), Phil Chalk (Ifield, Sussex), Prem Mehta (Batchworth Park, Hertfordshire), Nathan Lake (Easthampstead, BB&O), John Hubbleday (Harpenden, Hertfordshire), Barrie Harding (West Byfleet, Surrey), Giles Puckle (Clandon Regis, Surrey), Nick Horne (Rochester & Cobham Park, Kent), Kevin Maguire (Southwood, Hampshire), Connor Wood (Birchwood Park, Kent), Kevin Seggery (Centurion, Hertfordshire), Sam Allcock (Tenterden, Kent), Jeremy Platt (East Berkshire), Joe Simpson (Burford, BB&O). They’ll be joined by qualifiers from three other regional finals and the overall winner will be England’s male Handicap Golfer of the Year. The top nine players in the field will play in the pro-am of the Bridgestone Challenge, the English leg of The Challenge Tour, at Luton Hoo on 6 September. They’ll be joined by the top nine players from the companion women’s championship, making up a total of six teams in the pro-am. The most successful of these teams will go on to the pro-am of the British Masters, supported by Sky Sports, at Close House in Northumberland later in the same month, playing with a star of The European Tour. The Bridgestone Chase your Dream Trophy is an annual event open to members of England Golf’s 1,900 affiliated clubs and features separate competitions for men and women. Players can already register their interest in the 2018 Chase Your Dream Trophy by clicking here. Entries will open in the autumn to players who have been successful in 2017 club competitions and are eligible to enter the regional finals. Last season, England Golf and Bridgestone worked together to run a similar event called the Driveguard Trophy for club golfers. It made a dream come true for South West players Zack Rosen, Carl Broomfield and Peter Carr. The trio eventually found themselves as guests of Bridgestone at the British Masters supported by Sky Sports, playing alongside 2010 US Open winner Graeme McDowell. Click here for full scores 18 Jun 2017 John leads 19 South East golfers to chase their dream last_img read more

BREAKING NEWS: Fire Extinguished on Yacht Docked in Red Bank

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – Borough volunteer firefighters extinguished a fire Thursday afternoon that damaged a 44-foot cabin cruiser off of Marine Park.The fire on the  Lou’s Crews’ N, a Carver 44-foot yacht,  first ignited while the yacht was docked in the area of Irwin’s Marine at Marine Park. Irwin workers towed the vessel out of the marina area, sparing other boats and allowing the firefighters easier access, said Fire Chief Tom Doremus, who was on the scene.The fire lasted for about 10 minutes.“It looked like its been charred up pretty good,” Doremus said. No one was on the craft when it started, he said.The cause of the fire and the extent of the damage were being investigated by the State Police Marine Police unit, which responds to any fire on the water, Doremus said.About 20 members of the bought’s Independent Engine Company responded. There were no injuries reported, Doremus said.A similar boat would cost approximately $125,000 to purchase new, according to Irwin employee Brad Sergeant.last_img read more

Darwinians Gloat Over Political Power

first_imgWith media behind them, they can spout their talking points without controversy, while weak politicians only appease their critics.If David Johnson is right, politicians put up with conservative efforts to put up anti-evolution bills only to appease their religious constituents. Johnson, a postdoc at Rice University, looked into the outcomes of  “anti-evolution curricular challenges” in various states. According to PhysOrg, only 25% of bills under consideration passed out of committee, and only two states–Louisiana and Tennessee—succeeded in getting laws passed.Johnson added that while increased conservative Protestant adherence does lead to increased anti-evolution attitudes and activity among creation science interest groups, these outcomes are statistically unrelated to consideration of anti-evolution bills in state legislatures. This led him and his co-authors to theorize that the low rate of success in turning anti-evolution education bills into laws suggests that legislators may continue to push these reforms not because they expect success, but to mollify religious constituents.Johnson’s own biases are clear from his statement:“There is no scientific debate about the fundamentals of evolution,” he said. “And the best social scientific research shows that religious and nonreligious individuals are, overall, quite similar in their orientation to science. There are better ways to represent the values of religious communities: These bills create a misleading impression of conflict between science and religion and threaten the quality of education in public schools.“Sound familiar? Those are some of the same arguments made by Bill Nye when he debated Ken Ham. No debate exists, he said, and creation threatens education.This is why you never let totalitarians gain control of anything. They offer you “one man, one vote, one time.” When the Darwinazis gain control of scientific societies, legislatures and school boards, they lock the doors behind them. Of course there is no scientific debate in their wholly-dominated institutions; you have to be a Darwinazi wearing a D-Merit Badge to get in. Who was for teaching both sides? The despised creationists!Here’s how to understand Johnson’s statement, “There is no scientific debate about the fundamentals of evolution.” What are the fundamentals of evolution? Mutation and natural selection. Mutation is chance, a word equivalent to “stuff happens.” Natural selection is chance, a phrase equivalent to “stuff happens” – because neither the environment nor “selection pressures” (whatever they are) have any direction, purpose, or plan. Let SH stand for “stuff happens.” According to the math for chance, SH + SH does not equal 2SH, it equals SH. Johnson’s statement reduces to this: “There is no scientific debate that stuff happens.” Of course that is true; nobody disagrees that stuff happens. But is that science? Is that a logical explanation for wings, eyes and brains? Is that what schools should teach? Of course not. His statement is a clear example of a meaningless talking point. If Johnson were concerned with the quality of science education, he would advocate ditching Darwin (see 10/03/15) and seeking true causes for phenomena that look designed.What about the “misleading impression of conflict between science and religion” he spoke of? It wasn’t Christians, Protestants, or interest groups that created the impression: it was Darwinazis like Andrew White and John Draper who started that meme. The Christian founders of science viewed their work as seeking the mind of God; no conflict at all. Posing “science” vs “religion” is a false dichotomy. To creationists, the conflict is between good science (intelligent design) and bad science (Darwin’s Stuff Happens Law that builds minds out of hydrogen). And it’s a conflict between good religion (trust in a Designer intelligent enough and powerful enough to bring the world into being) and bad religion (big-bang-to-man theory, with no causation, no purpose, and no meaning). By all means, don’t fall into the trap of framing the debate like they do as ‘science vs religion.’ If you do, you’ve lost before you started. Read this about “science” from Evolution News & Views.With these points in mind, you are ready to evaluate whether creation threatens the quality of education in public schools. Should children learn about adequate causes and effects, or throw up their hands like Darwin and say “stuff happens”? Should they learn about observable, repeatable, testable facts, or learn how to tell just-so stories? Should they learn logic, or imbibe self-refuting ideologies? That’s how you should frame the debate.Some “anti-evolution” groups like the Discovery Institute do not advocate teaching intelligent design at all, let alone creation science. They would be content to get schools to teach Darwinian evolution honestly, not the uncritical whitewashed version with the flawed icons used to illustrate it. They agree with Darwin: “A fair result can only be obtained by fully stating the facts and arguments on both sides of each question” (see Academic Freedom Day). Amen! (Too bad Darwin failed to do that in The Origin, a fact he admitted in the preface.) Hold this Darwin quote in the face of the Darwinazis and tell them to obey it. Tell them science is not about consensus. Tell them they are closed-minded bigots for refusing to consider challenges to their atheistic religion.Johnson is able to label Darwin skeptics as “interest groups” because his interest group has power. For the same reason conspiracies never prosper (because if they prosper, none dare call them conspiracies), interest groups never prosper, because when they do, they cease being called interest groups. They become The Consensus. “All scientists agree” that “there is no scientific debate” about the fundamentals of Stuff Happens. You have to get outside the fogma to see through this rhetorical trick.Darwinazi John Tyndall, one of Charlie’s X-club co-conspirators, said this to the British Association in 1874:“The impregnable position of science may be described in a few words. We claim, and we shall wrest from theology, the entire field of cosmological theory. All schemes and systems which thus infringe upon the domain of science must, in so far as they do this, submit to its control, and relinquish all thought of controlling it.”  [See James Clerk Maxwell’s poetic response to Tyndall’s insufferable chutzpah in our 8/10/2005 commentary.]That’s not science. That’s not education. It’s totalitarianism. It’s scientism pretending to be helping the children, but determined to rule the world. Don’t be fooled. The Darwinazis have had power for a long time, but that’s no reason to become a DODO like them, pushing DOPE. It took a long time to end slavery, too. Keep the heat on, and if your representatives put on the appeasement facade but won’t challenge the Darwinazis, vote the rascals out.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Were You Productive Today?

first_imgDid you make progress on your most important project? Productivity isn’t how many things you scratch off your to-do list. You can have days where you complete all kinds of tasks, none of which have anything to do with what was really important. Productivity is doing what’s important.Did you move closer to your most important goal? If what you did today did not move you closer to your goals, you may not have been as productive as you might have been. Goals are achieved by taking disciplined action day after day, not all at once. If what you’re doing isn’t aligned with your long-term goals, you may have gotten things done without being productive.Did you do the three most important tasks that needed to be done today? I like the idea of having three major tasks to get done. It seems like the right number of major tasks. Maybe three 90-minute blocks of time invested in the above projects and goals? You might be able to do more, but if you have a list of twelve major tasks to do, you are kidding yourself.Did you make a difference? Did the things you do today make a difference? Did they make a difference in your business? Did they make a difference in your personal life? Did they make a difference in someone else’s life, maybe someone who needed your help? The most important work you do makes a difference. A lot of things we do fail this test, even if it makes you feel busy.Did you invest the appropriate time and energy in one or two of your most important relationships? There isn’t anything more important in your life than the people you care about and the people who care about you. You might be so busy doing “what” you are doing that you forget “why” you are doing it and for “whom” are you doing it?Did you learn something today that will help you improve your future results? Productivity isn’t only about doing what needs to be done now. Being productive also requires that you sharpen your saw. You are the saw. You’ll become dull if you don’t take the time to do things to keep sharp.Did you take care of your physical health? This one should have probably been first on the list. You need physical energy to be productive. You also need mental energy and stamina. You won’t have these things if you don’t eat well, drink water, exercise, and sleep (likely more than you are now, and likely more than you want to). You can’t be productive if you are wiped out.last_img read more

Turkish cybercriminals hack ATMs in Tripura, steal huge cash

first_imgAfter Assam, suspected cybercriminals from Turkey have stolen huge amounts of cash from ATMs through ATM-cloning devices installed in Tripura’s capital Agartala, police said on Monday.According to the police, banks and other sources, over 60 bank customers of different banks mostly State Bank of India (SBI) during the past few days lost lakhs of rupees due to the fraudulent acts of the cybercriminals and ATM hackers.Tripura police’s Cyber Crime wing Superintendent of Police Sharmistha Chakraborty said that as per their preliminary probe the Turkish nationals who had taken out lakhs of rupees of bank customers through the ATM-cloning devices in Guwahati in August are also involved in similar hacking in Agartala.“We are collecting complaints of bank customers from various police stations and different bank branches to gather the information and other details of stolen cash of many bank customers from ATMs through ATM-cloning devices,” Chakraborty said.She said according to their information available the suspected Turkish nationals after pilfering money from the several ATMs left Tripura for Kolkata.“Our probe is on. If necessary we would take help from other agencies of concerned states where similar crimes took place,” the official added.According to local media reports, over ₹80 lakhs of several customers were stolen from several ATMs during the past few days in Agartala.SBI’s Regional Manager Dibyendu Chowdhury said that they have so far received complains from 45 customers that they lost their money due to the ATM hacking.Chowdhury said that the SBI has blocked a number of ATM and debit cards of its customers as precautionary measures.According to a cyber-technology expert, the ATM card cloning system comprises a spy camera, a memory card and a small data device to gather ATM and account details of bank customers. Recently, two Turkish nationals involved in the ATM hacking were arrested in Mumbai.Incidents of stealing money of a large number of bank customers from ATMs through ATM cloning devices took place in different parts of the country including Kolkata and Guwahati.last_img read more

NEB gives Trans Mountain pipeline expansion its endorsement

first_imgThe National Energy Board has endorsed an expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline following a reconsideration of its impact on marine life off the B.C. coast.The energy regulator says an increase in tanker traffic resulting from the pipeline would hurt southern resident killer whales and increase greenhouse gas emissions.But it says those consequences can be justified in light of what would be the pipeline’s benefits.“While these effects weighed heavily in the NEB’s consideration of project-related marine shipping, the NEB recommends that the government of Canada find that they can be justified in the circumstances, in light of the considerable benefits of the project and measures to minimize the effects.”The energy board says it will impose 156 conditions on the project if it is approved. It has also made 16 new recommendations to the federal government.Alberta has been fighting hard for the Trans Mountain expansion so that the province could move more crude oil to ports and from there to lucrative overseas markets.The energy board’s original approval of the project was set aside last summer by the Federal Court of Appeal, which said the regulator had not properly considered marine life.The NEB’s report starts the clock on a 90-day period for the federal government to decide whether the project should proceed.Officials in Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi’s office have said a final decision won’t be made until consultations with affected Indigenous groups are complete.The consultations were also an issue the federal Appeal Court raised when it put a halt on the project.last_img read more

Colorado lawsuit could ripple through US cannabis industry

first_imgDENVER – A federal trial in Colorado could have far-reaching effects on the United States’ budding marijuana industry if a jury sides with a couple who say having a cannabis business as a neighbour hurts their property’s value.The trial set to begin Monday in Denver is the first time a jury will consider a lawsuit using federal anti-racketeering law to target cannabis companies. But the marijuana industry has closely watched the case since 2015, when attorneys with a Washington, D.C.-based firm first filed their sweeping complaint on behalf of Hope and Michael Reilly.One of the couple’s lawyers, Brian Barnes, said they bought the southern Colorado land for its views of Pikes Peak and have since built a house on the rural property. They also hike and ride horses there.But they claim “pungent, foul odours” from a neighbouring indoor marijuana grow have hurt the property’s value and their ability to use and enjoy it.“That’s just not right,” Barnes said. “It’s not right to have people in violation of federal law injuring others.”An attorney for the business targeted by the suit plans to argue the couple’s property has not been damaged, relying in part on the county’s tax valuations of the Reillys’ land ticking up over time.Vulnerability to similar lawsuits is among the many risks facing marijuana businesses licensed by states but still violating federal law. Suits using the same strategy have been filed in California, Massachusetts and Oregon.Mirroring the Reilly complaint, several claim the smell of marijuana damages neighbouring owners’ ability to enjoy their land or harms their property value.The question now is whether jurors accept the argument.“They can claim a $1 million drop in property value, but if a jury does not agree and says $5,000, that’s not that big of a deal,” said Rob Mikos, a Vanderbilt University law professor who specializes in drug law. “That’s why there are a lot of eyes on the case.”Congress created the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act — better known as RICO — to target the Mafia in the 1970s, allowing prosecutors to argue leaders of a criminal enterprise should pay a price along with lower-level defendants.But the anti-racketeering law also allows private parties to file lawsuits claiming their business or property has been damaged by a criminal enterprise. Those who prove it can be financially compensated for damages times three, plus attorneys’ expenses.Starting in 2015, opponents of the marijuana industry decided to use the strategy against companies producing or selling marijuana products, along with investors, insurers, state regulators and other players. Cannabis companies immediately saw the danger of high legal fees or court-ordered payouts.That concern only grew when a Denver-based federal appeals court ruled in 2017 that the Reillys could use anti-racketeering law to sue the licensed cannabis grower neighbouring their property. Insurance companies and other entities originally named in the Reillys’ suit have gradually been removed, some after reaching financial settlements out of court.The case focuses on property in Pueblo County, where local officials saw marijuana as an opportunity to boost an area left behind by the steel industry. Most Colorado counties ban outdoor grows, forcing pot cultivators to find expensive warehouse space.Pueblo officials positioned their sunny, flat plains as the alternative. They created financial incentives in hopes of drawing growers to outdoor fields or cavernous buildings left vacant by other industries.Parker Walton was among the early comers, buying 40 acres in the rural town of Rye in 2014.Barnes said the Reillys made three separate land purchases between 2011 and 2014, gradually reaching more than 100 acres. They learned about plans for the marijuana business bordering their final purchase four months after completing the sale, he said.Walton put up a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter) building to grow and harvest marijuana plants indoors. The Reillys filed their lawsuit in early 2015. A year later, Walton announced the company’s first harvest via Instagram, snapping a photo of a strain dubbed “Purple Trainwreck” hanging to cure in a dim room.Fewer than five people including Walton work for the company, which sells its products to retail stores, his attorney, Matthew Buck said.Buck said he’s confident jurors will decide the Reillys’ property has not been harmed. Buck warned, though, that defending against a similar lawsuit comes at a high cost for marijuana businesses while plaintiffs with support from a large law firm have little to lose.Cooper & Kirk, the firm handling the couple’s suit, has a conservative reputation, including a founding partner who worked for the U.S. Justice Department during the Reagan administration. Barnes said members of the firm were “troubled” as states began legalizing the adult use of marijuana because of the inherent conflict with federal law, and they brainstormed legal strategies.Walton created a website this month to raise money for his defence. He wrote that a loss could jeopardize “all legal cannabis operations in all states.”But some lawyers who have defended companies in similar lawsuits said those fears are overhyped.Adam Wolf, a California attorney, said he believes the suits are primarily intended to scare third-party companies into cutting ties with marijuana firms or persuading cannabis companies to shut down. But long-term, Wolf said the U.S. Supreme Court has curtailed lawsuits making civil racketeering claims against other industries.Courts could apply the same logic to cannabis, he argued.“What the plaintiffs seemed to be saying is anybody who touched, in any matter, any marijuana business is potentially liable,” Wolf said. “And that is a soundly rejected argument by the courts.”Barnes, though, said the number of racketeering lawsuits awaiting action suggests attorneys with no ties to his firm believe in the strategy.___Kathleen Foody is a member of AP’s marijuana beat team. Follow her at twitter.com/katiefoodyFind complete AP marijuana coverage here:apnews.com/tag/LegalMarijuanalast_img read more