US Navy Successfully Concludes Largest Demonstration of Shipboard Alternative Fuel Use

first_img View post tag: use The U.S. Navy successfully concluded its largest demonstration of shipboard alternative fuel use Nov. 17, with the successful arrival of the Self Defense Test Ship (SDTS) to Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme, Calif.The SDTS is a decommissioned Spruance-class destroyer ex-Paul F. Foster (EDD 964) reconfigured to provide the Navy an at-sea, remotely controlled, engineering test and evaluation platform without the risk to personnel or operational assets.The ship received approximately 20,000 gallons of a 50-50 blend of an algae-derived, hydro-processed algal oil and petroleum F-76 from the Defense Fuel Supply Point at Naval Base Point Loma, Nov. 16.“How can we have an impact?” asked Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment) Jackalyne Pfannenstiel at the demonstration’s kick-off. “We can have an impact as a technology leader, highlighting and demonstrating the viability of biofuels as we are here today. This demo, the largest to date, is a major milestone for us. More than 50 percent of our fuel goes to maritime use. When this ship arrives in Port Hueneme, we will be a giant step closer to powering our Great Green Fleet and demonstrating progress toward a sustainable energy future.”Shortly after Pfannenstiel’s remarks, the ship began its 17-hour transit back to Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme using the 50-50 blend. While the SDTS has four LM 2500 main propulsion gas turbines and four 501-K17 ship service gas turbine generators, the ship only operated on one LM 2500 and two 501-K17s during the demonstration, so 100 percent of ship’s propulsion power and 50 percent of service power came from the algal oil/F-76 fuel blend.Meeting the secretary of the Navy’s call for a drop-in fuel replacement, no changes were required to the infrastructure of the ship or fueling pier for the SDTS test. The demonstration also marked the only at-sea operational test of alternative fuels in the LM 2500 – the engine found in most surface combatants – before the Green Strike Group demonstration planned for 2012.“For the test, a baseline run was made on the ship’s transit from Port Hueneme to San Diego using F-76 fuel,” said Rick Kamin, Naval Fuels and Lubricants Cross Functional Team lead. “Using the 50-50 blend on the return run to Port Hueneme, the tested engines were assessed on their abilities to perform start sequences as well as motoring and purging operations noted in Engineering Operational Sequencing System procedures. “We also collected data on compressor inlet temperature, engine speed, engine start time, fuel manifold pressure, turbine outlet temperature, turbine inlet temperature, ship service gas turbine generators power output and gas turbine main engine shaft output.”“From our perspective as the ship’s operators, there was absolutely no difference, whatsoever, in the operation or performance of the ship,” said Mike Wolfe, Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme Division underway project officer. “The fuel burned just like the traditional fuel we get from the Navy and have been burning for years. We could not tell the difference. The biggest success is that a Navy ship with engines identical to those in commissioned warships operated successfully on an overnight transit with the alternative fuel without a glitch in anything. Operationally, it was absolutely a success.”The alternative fuels effort supports the Navy’s overall energy strategy to increase energy security and safeguard the environment. Recent and upcoming maritime vehicle alternative fuel testing includes an ongoing yard patrol boat demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy and a Landing Craft, Air-Cushioned vessel demonstration scheduled for early December at Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City, Panama City, Fla.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , November 21, 2011; Image: navy Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy Successfully Concludes Largest Demonstration of Shipboard Alternative Fuel Use Equipment & technology US Navy Successfully Concludes Largest Demonstration of Shipboard Alternative Fuel Use View post tag: alternative View post tag: Shipboard View post tag: Demonstration View post tag: US View post tag: largestcenter_img View post tag: successfully View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Fuel View post tag: Concludes View post tag: News by topic November 21, 2011 Share this articlelast_img read more

Electrifying invention can save young lives

first_imgTreatment with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has proved to be lifesaving in newborns, children, and adults with several dangerous conditions. But the availability of the treatment has been limited by the size, weight, and complexity of equipment needed to administer the gas, and the therapy’s high price.Now a research team led by Warren M. Zapol, the Reginald Jenney Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), has developed a lightweight, portable system that produces NO from the air by means of an electrical spark. Zapol, who pioneered the use of inhaled nitric oxide, is the senior author of a report on the system, which is described by MGH investigators in the July 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine.“Nitric oxide is used to treat about 35,000 hospitalized U.S. patients each year — mostly adults with pulmonary hypertension and infants with a condition called persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN),” said Zapol, director of the MGH Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research and emeritus chief of anesthesia and critical care at the hospital.“But NO therapy is very expensive — here at MGH, five days’ treatment of a newborn with PPHN costs around $14,000 — and current systems use gas delivered in heavy tanks, making ambulatory treatment impractical,” he explained. “Our new system can economically make NO from the nitrogen and oxygen in the air using only small amounts of electric power. This device could enable trials of NO to treat patients with chronic lung diseases and certain kinds of heart failure, and would make NO therapy available in parts of the world that don’t have the resources that are currently required.”Not to be confused with the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide, nitric oxide was long considered to be only a toxic pollutant gas. But in the mid-1980s, three U.S. investigators discovered that NO is a signal-transmitting molecule naturally used by the pulmonary, cardiac, and other systems — a discovery that received the 1998 Nobel Prize. Among its many functions, NO relaxes muscles surrounding blood vessels, which reduces blood pressure — a property that led Zapol and his colleagues to investigate its use to treat hypertension in vessels supplying the lungs. Their discovery that inhaled NO selectively relaxed pulmonary vessels without producing a systemic drop in blood pressure led to the therapy’s FDA approval in 1999 for the treatment of PPHN and other lung diseases in newborns. In 2003, Zapol and his former research fellow Claes Frostell received the Inventor of the Year award from the Intellectual Property Owners Association for the development of a system to safely deliver inhaled NO.Since its FDA approval, NO has been supplied to hospitals in large tanks of compressed gas and administered through bulky and complex delivery devices by trained respiratory therapists. However, in 1992, Zapol and MGH were issued a patent for a system his team had developed to produce NO — which can be naturally produced by lightning bolts — from air by means of an electrical spark.Although the discovery was licensed by two medical and industrial gas companies, the technology was never developed, possibly because the medical use of inhaled NO was only beginning to be accepted. In addition, the system originally invented by the MGH team was still too large for use in outpatient settings. The growing therapeutic use of NO — along with technological advances including the availability of miniaturized electronic circuitry — allowed the MGH team to develop the system described in the current report.The investigators designed and built two prototype systems: in one, the NO generator is a separate “offline” system continually generating gas that is delivered into a ventilation system via tubing; the second, an “inline” system, is incorporated into the ventilation system in a way that synchronizes the generation of NO during inhalation with the pulsed delivery of oxygen and other gases to be inhaled, reducing the NO that would be lost during exhalation. Because generation of NO by an electric spark can also produce the toxic gases nitrogen dioxide and ozone, along with metal fragments from the electrode, both systems use calcium hydroxide and air filters to absorb and remove those byproducts.A series of experiments helped the team determine the best metal to use for the electrode — iridium — and the optimal timing and number of electric sparks. Testing in an animal model revealed that the electrically generated NO produced by both systems was as effective as tank-delivered gas in relieving pulmonary hypertension. Although a gas mixture containing 50 percent oxygen produced the highest NO levels, the amount produced from ambient air was sufficient for therapeutic use. Both systems continued to deliver therapeutic levels of NO for up to 10 days, and subsequent experiments with the inline system not included in this report have continued for up to 28 days. There’s no reason to think the system could not stably produce NO for even longer periods of time, noted Zapol.“It’s amazing how long this system continues to make NO,” he said. “Once we’ve shown that this [system] can safely be used in human patients with pulmonary hypertension — and we’ve got a clinical trial in progress right now — we’ll be able to conduct studies of inhaled NO delivered in ambulatory settings, including patients’ homes, to treat chronic pulmonary hypertension, right-sided heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”last_img read more

Albert C. DeCiccio Named Provost at Southern Vermont College

first_imgAlbert C. DeCiccio, former Academic Dean of Rivier College in Nashua, N.H.,Named Provost at Southern Vermont College(Bennington, Vt.) — Southern Vermont College has selected Albert C. DeCiccio, the former Academic Dean of Rivier College, a Catholic liberal arts college in Nashua, N.H., to fill the newly created post of Provost. He assumed the position as the college’s Chief Academic Officer on July 7.DeCiccio earned his undergraduate degree at Merrimack College in 1974, his master’s degree in English from SUNY Albany, and his doctorate in English, Rhetoric and Composition from Arizona State University.”In Al DeCiccio, we have found a person with a remarkably wide range of talents,” SVC President Karen Gross said. “In addition to being a true scholar, he is deeply engaged in thinking about pedagogy and creative and thoughtful programmatic development. He is adept at helping others grow and learn, and he believes in small colleges and their capacity to change lives. SVC welcomes him to our community and looks forward to his wisdom, his good humor and his remarkable thoughtfulness. Students, faculty and staff will be enriched by the opportunity to work with him. The search committee, chaired by Professor Tom Redden, are to be commended for their efforts.”President Gross explained that the college replaced the position of Academic Dean with that of Provost in order to emphasize that “academic life is an institution’s primary asset an asset that must be nurtured and fostered each and every day. The chief academic officer must be an institution’s compelling and inspirational voice about the power and capacity of education, and must effectively engage students, faculty and the wider community in the enterprise of education expressed through a vision for the essential value of liberal arts colleges in the 21st century.”As Academic Dean for the past eight years, DeCiccio has been responsible for the development of all graduate and undergraduate liberal arts, sciences and professional studies programs at the 2,070-student college.Of the role of Provost, DeCiccio commented that “the Provost should establish the academic vision of the College for all constituencies, and broadcast that vision in the local civic community and, more nationally, in the higher education community. A Provost is very different from an Academic Dean, who is chiefly concerned with academic affairs and matters involving the faculty.”DeCiccio also explained that he is looking forward to coming to a small, liberal arts college, an environment where, as the first in his family to earn a college degree, he discovered the value of education.”I am a product of the small college, and I have thrived in that environment,” DeCiccio said. “Small, liberal arts colleges are staffed by faculty who love the classroom and the students in it from the first year through the last year. I am so pleased to have the chance to work with faculty who will take their roles seriously in the formation of their students.”Once he’s established in his new role, DeCiccio expects to teach classes himself.”I love to teach writing, fiction, writing center theory, rhetoric,” he said.And what advice does he give to students entering college? “The difference between high school and college is freedom, and the extent that students can negotiate that freedom, they will succeed in college,” he noted. “In high school, one learns how to find answers; in college, one learns how to ask questions.”In his spare time, he enjoys reading, live music, traveling and delving into the history of a place, but he’s also a sports fan.”I was thrilled with the Celtics winning the championship, but one of the great gifts of my life is to have seen the Red Sox win Two World Series,” he said.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing liberal arts education with 19 academic degree programs for approximately 450 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.last_img read more