EXCLUSIVE: Fruition’s Jay Cobb Anderson On Misjudging His Own Songs & Watching It All Fall Apart

first_imgLive For Live Music: With so many songwriters in Fruition, I always wonder how much of a scrum the sessions are. How many songs did you have to choose from for the new album?Jay Cobb Anderson: It was difficult. There were a lot of songs on the table. In the past, we’ve tried to split it up more equally so you heard from each songwriter. For this album we wanted to pick all of the songs we felt the strongest about. I ended up having more songs on this record than the others, but we think these songs fit together the best and were the strongest. This was an especially difficult one though.L4LM: Have you guys considered a double or even a triple album?JCA: Absolutely. Seeing how this one goes…that may end up happening for the next record. We have so much material. That said, another thing we want to do is get a live record out there too. We might end up putting two things out, a live record and an LP. We’ll see.L4LM: I feel like you have a rabid-enough fan base that you could put out two records a year, easily.JCA: I totally agree with you. That’s the thing with being self-promoted. Our whole goal as a band has been to build a strong enough team, including funding, to be able to put out records as much as we would like. That’s been difficult. But we did just sign on with LoHi Records, and this whole experience working with them has been great. We loved working with them. They love us. Watching It All Fall Apart, the new record, it’s a product of that love.With that love in mind, we are already starting to think of stuff for a new album, like I said. We hope this is the start of a long and successful friendship. We’re really excited about that. The way the music industry works now, everything is on you. We want to make more music, but when it’s all on you it’s a lot more difficult.L4LM: Tim Carbone (Railroad Earth) and his partners really seem to have put something wonderful together with LoHi Records. Did you get to work with Tim on Watching It All Fall Apart?JCA: He didn’t work on the record itself, but he was the catalyst for us joining on LoHi. He sat in with us at the Hillberry Music Festival, and when we got done with our set he asked us what we planned on doing with our new material. That was about the same time when we were considering what to do ourselves. He listened to what we had and said he loved it and invited us to work with LoHi.It was perfect timing. We had been shopping around for a home for the music and hadn’t found any offers we liked. Then we chatted with the crew at LoHi and it evolved into what it is now. And we’re really stoked.Fruition – “Labor Of Love” – Northwest String Summit – 7/12/17[Video: Live For Live Music]L4LM: When writing songs do you ever have moments where you think…”This is it, this is one of the good ones,” or even the opposite like, say, “This blows. No one is gonna dig this at all.” If so, how often are you right?JCA: Absolutely! It’s funny. A lot of the time I get it wrong. Our first single, “I’ll Never Sing Your Name”, wasn’t even on the table for the new record. I thought it was just this little crappy song that I wrote and it ended up being the first single.That happened in the past too…on our album Just One Of Them Nights, I thought the title track was no good at all. Then I played a solo show with my buddy Brad Parsons and he was like “Where did that song come from?” I said something dismissive and he was like, “No man, you need to play that. You need to play that for your band!” And then it became the title track of that album. So I guess I’m not that good at predicting…L4LM: How many shows did Fruition play last year?JCA: Oh god, I have no idea. At least 150. Probably closer to 200.L4LM: Are you folks looking to match the same pace this year?JCA: Oh yeah. We’re on the first leg of a two-and-a-half month tour. I think we’re doing five weeks, taking ten days off, then another five. Then, for spring into the summer we start doing all the one-offs, week-long runs and, of course, the festivals!L4LM: The glorious festivals!JCA: YES!L4LM: When Fruition gets going, you front-line folks have been known to slam around the stage in an almost basketball team-style weave. Ever slip up and slam into each other when you get all caught up in the music?JCA: Oh yeah. A lot of that energy you see, at least like what you are describing, started out in our origins as a busking band. When you’re out on the street playing for cash and trying to get attention, you tend to move around a lot. So much of that stuff, like our movement, comes from that era. Most of the worst instances of banging into each other happened back then…Once we started playing on stages, we got to the point where we had a lot more room. Luckily most of the stages these days give us enough room.L4LM: You gotta watch out for Mimi…she looks like she could take you out with those elbows.JCA: I worry mostly about me and my lanky self.Fruition – “Hey Hey What Can I Do” (Led Zeppelin cover) – Hoxeyville Music Festival – 8/19/17:[Video: Live For Live Music]L4LM: Your live performances are exhausting to watch, but damn exciting too. Do you feel like the new record captures that live Fruition vibe?JCA: Most of the songs that we recorded for this disc are ones we hadn’t played live. It was fun to try and translate that energy into them. I do think this one captures the energy better. The song “I’ll Never Sing Your Name” [on the album] was recorded totally live. There are a couple of tunes on this record that were recorded almost completely in-the-moment.L4LM: Do you feel like the zeitgeist influences your songwriting? The world is getting kinda weird and harsh lately…JCA: I think with this album it definitely did. Like you said…it’s a strange world out there. There’s no big social commentary on this album, but I think Watching It All Fall Apart kinda works for a title and a description of the way the world seems sometimes.We want to make more of a political statement, but you have to be careful. It seems one of the big problems is the splitting along lines and the dividing that is happening among people being so hard on one side or the other. We don’t want to make that gap bigger…we want to bring people together.For a full list of upcoming Fruition tour dates, head to the band’s website. You can listen to their new album, Watching It All Fall Apart, below via Spotify:Fruition – Watching It All Fall Apart[Cover photo via Sam Shinault] Over the past year, Fruition has seen their stardom rise on a national scale, slowly but steadily climbing up the bills of renowned music festivals and performing at iconic venues like Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre. We caught up with Fruition lead guitarist Jay Cobb Anderson as he prepared to load in for a gig in Kansas the same week the band’s released their newest disc, Watching It All Fall Apart. The life of a touring musician may be a dream come true, but no one ever claimed it was easy. Even with all that going on, Jay was more than happy to talk about the stellar selection of new tunes on Fruition’s new album and the process the band went through to composing and selecting the tracks.last_img read more

Pertamina expects to begin running Cilacap biorefinery in 2021

first_imgState-owned oil giant Pertamina expects its new biofuel refinery in Cilacap, Central Java, to begin first-phase operations next year as part of the government’s biodiesel push.The facility will have a “small capacity” of 3,000 barrels per day (bpd) but the output will be “100 percent made from crude palm oil,” said Ignatius Tallulembang, president director of Pertamina’s refinery arm, PT Kilang Pertamina Internasional (PT KPI), on Wednesday.“Late next year we will have a capacity of 3,000 bpd. We will raise the capacity to 6,000 bpd by 2022,” he told House of Representatives lawmakers in Jakarta. The biorefinery is small compared to Pertamina’s headline oil refinery projects, whose output levels are over 100,000 bpd each. Such projects include another refinery in the Cilacap compound from which development partner, Saudi Arabia’s Aramco, recently pulled out.“We will focus on our biorefinery first,” said Ignatius.The Cilacap refinery will support the government’s ongoing 30 percent palm oil-mixed (B30) biodiesel program meant to slash Indonesia’s oil imports, which are a major contributor to the country’s gaping trade deficit.However, the palm oil industry behind B30 has also been linked to deforestation and raging forest fires that environmentalists warn may offset carbon emission reductions from reducing oil consumption.Topics :last_img read more

Character cottage renovated to delight

first_imgThe home at 57 Kadumba St, Yeronga is on the marketA CHARACTER cottage with swimming pool is new to the market in Yeronga. Cate Spence bought the property at 57 Kadumba St 11 years ago after falling in love with the VJ walls, high ceilings and “beautiful” fretwork. “I just love old Queenslanders and homes with character,” she said. In the time she has owned the property, Ms Spence has renovated the bathrooms, removed a wall between the kitchen and lounge room, revamped the kitchen and repainted the home, all while retaining the heritage charm. The kitchen opens to the living area.“I also added a deck out the back and removed all the palm trees that were in the yard and replaced them with natives,” she said. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The four-bedroom cottage has polished timber floors, a front balcony and double lockup garage. The dine-in kitchen has bi-fold windows that open to the back deck and a storage area off the kitchen has been turned into a walk-in pantry. The lounge room has built-in bookcases and there is a dressing room off the master bedroom that could be converted into an ensuite. The back deck is shaded by native trees.Ms Spence is selling to relocate but she said she would miss her fabulous neighbours.“The house is in such a great area and it’s so close to the city,” she said. The home is being marketed by Sharon and Kate Wilson from McGrath Annerley Yeronga for offers over $735,000.center_img The lounger room has built-in bookcasesDownstairs is a self-contained area with a bedroom, which needs council approval, a living area, kitchenette and bathroom. Outside, the yard is fully enclosed and there is a fenced, above-ground pool. Ms Spence said her favourite space inside the home was the open living area and kitchen while the deck was her “go to place” in the summer. “It’s very private because of the beautiful trees, and it faces north, so it gets lots of lovely breezes,” she said. last_img read more

Officials investigate shooting at pizza restaurant in Miami

first_imgOfficials in Miami are currently on the scene of a reported at a restaurant in Miami.The shooting was reported at Frankie’s Pizza at 9118 Bird Road.Not much is known about the incident at this time, however, the Miami-Herald is reporting that at least one person was shot in the restaurant’s parking lot and at least one other was injured.It is unclear if the two injured were shooting at each other or if there were others involved.A Miami-Dade police spokesperson told reporters that they are currently on their way to the scene and will provide details on the incident once they are available.This is a developing story.last_img read more

APASS holds panel on racism

first_imgStudents and community members gathered Thursday evening for a panel discussion focusing on empowering the Asian American youth community after a copy of a racist flier was sent to USC Asian Pacific American Student Services and UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center. The event was co-sponsored by the Student Coalition for Asian Pacific Empowerment, and the Asian Pacific American Student Assembly.The panel was made up of Asian American activists and community organizers including Nat Lowe from Asian Americans Advancing Justice; Tracy Zhao, a graduate of Pomona College and a research associate at UCLA, and Andrew Quan from the organization Liberty in North Korea. The panel shared their experiences and gave advice to students on how to mobilize their community to accomplish change before the event moved into an open discussion on issues of race on campus.“When I saw the flier, I was like, ‘Wow, that’s really horrible,’ but we’re all here talking about these issues,” Lowe said.The panelists warned against letting emotion influence the response, and said it was important to use this as an opportunity to educate the community about the issues.“It’s easy to get angry about issues, [but] we can’t think about our policies and actions as reactionary, you have to think about what you want to see, what is your vision for your future and your community. It might not feel like activism but you’re enabling people to keep doing what they’re doing,” Zhao said.Quan said it was important to use these experiences to motivate people to get engaged in the cause.“You need to start with the why, the temptation is to just start telling people what to do, but the why is the most important, sharing facts and statistics, or personal stories,” Quan said. “Build on top of the emotional energy with knowledge.”All the panelists urged students to engage with the issues and not to leave them to students in leadership roles or the administration.“In a social justice context, when I think about leadership I think about a commitment to social justice,” Lowe said. “The conventional thought about leadership is you have to have certain qualities, communicate in certain ways, but anyone can have [that commitment.,”The event then shifted toward a discussion on the recent controversy surrounding fliers distributed on UCLA’s campus and sent to USC APASS. Both APASS and APASA issued official responses to the letter, both of which can be found online. Both said they were careful in crafting their response so as not to avoid giving the perpetrator undue publicity.“This is something that is new to us,” director of APASS Mary Ho said. “It’s not about APASS, it’s what it means to the students — what we chose to do. It was a chance to empower students, and to have them frame what social justice means to them, and have them make history at USC.”APASA and USC SCAPE coordinated a response that was co-signed by student groups around campusand around the country, including the Asian Pacific American Coalition at the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign.“Let’s retool this as a learning tool, use it to educate and empower,” said Jonathan Wang, assistant director of APASS. “It doesn’t matter who the author was, it was meant to drive us apart.”The administration, has not made an official statement, but Vice Provost for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry was present to gauge student response.“We have to [strike] a really important balance here: We don’t want to give the perpetrator any advertising; we don’t want the flyer to receive the attraction of the university promoting it,” Carry said. “We’ve been coordinating a response. We thought the APASS response and the student response was perfect, and we didn’t want to trump that response.”He said that he and the administration were taking the issue very seriously.“As a person of color, I imagined all those terminologies being used against me, and the people I care about, and at USC we do not tolerate that language. This is a community that values its diversity — it is our number one asset,” Carry said.He invoked Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous words: “An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”“This has an impact on our entire institution,” Carry said. “We are standing together to make sure this is not tolerated on our campus; it is deplorable.”He further urged students to engage in dialogue across cultural boundaries so as not to have a “siloed” approach to the problem.“Imagine how our response would be if we were all equally offended by this,” Carry said. “When any part of our community is challenged, we should all feel challenged; this problem is so big we can’t expect one culture to deal with it. Our approach needs to be cross-cultural.”When asked how students should engage with administrators, Lily Chowana-Bandu, interim director of Campus Activities, urged students to utilize their available resources.“We all support your cause; we were all appalled,” she said. “This is not a part of your USC or UCLA experience — you should have an opportunity to learn where it’s safe, supportive and fun. If you want to talk to any administrator, they will bring it up the chain. We want to be supportive. You are supported in any avenue.”Representatives from El Centro Chicano attended the forum and voiced their support for the cause, saying that it was an issue that affected all minority students in the community.Rayven Vinson, a senior majoring in international relations and Spanish, said the hidden identity of the flier’s author created a sense of mistrust within the student community.“It creates that fear that you’re in a community where there are members who are targeting a group that you are a part of,” Vinson said. “These are people you see every day.”Other students said addressing the problem required becoming more accepting as a community.“We as a society need to become more accepting and open to interacting with different people, like international students,” said Jacky Chen, a sophomore majoring in engineering.last_img read more