Same-Sex Parenting: Child Abuse?

first_imgPublic Discourse 8 July 2013After having spent the last year involved in the debate about same-sex parenting, I can say the following with great confidence: both sides of the same-sex marriage debate are afraid of naming child abuse by same-sex couples. The issue is so raw and painful that even critics of same-sex parenting are scared to go there.Pro-SSM people say gays have been unfairly stereotyped as child abusers, so any discussion of gay child abusers is adding to their oppression. Anti-SSM commentators generally don’t want the added fuss of showing up on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of homophobes. So a general pattern emerges: even when you critique same-sex parenting, you must never do so in terms that sound accusatory or equate homosexuality with child abuse.Let’s be clear: I am not saying that same-sex parents are automatically guilty of any kind of physical, sexual, or emotional abuse to the children they raise. Nor am I saying that LGBT people are less likely to take good care of children.What I mean is this: Even the most heroic mother in the world can’t father. So to intentionally deprive any child of her mother or father, except in cases like divorce for grave reasons or the death of a parent, is itself a form of abuse. (Though my mother raised me with the help of a lesbian partner, I do not feel I was abused, because I always knew that my mother didn’t intend for my father to divorce her.)This holds true not only for same-sex parenting, but for any choice to parent a child in a less-than-ideal setting for a less-than-grave reason. It’s abuse, for example, for a single parent to adopt a child when many other equally good two-parent homes are available. It’s abuse for parents to divorce simply for reasons related to their own emotional happiness. It’s abuse for LGBT couples to create children through IVF and then deprive them of a mother or father.Media Tip-Toeing Around AbuseTwo recent pieces in the Washington Post and the New York Times last month are noteworthy, because both broke the silence on the downsides of same-sex parenting but still carefully avoided the word “abuse.”After months of presenting a whitewashed portrait of same-sex parenting, the Post finally ran a letter from Tommy Valentine of Alexandra, Virginia, warning the proponents of homosexual adoption that “A child is not a commodity to be coveted, like the car or house,” and “Even with an ‘open adoption’ arrangement with his birth mother, Kyler [the adoptee] is being deprived of the unique, irreplaceable impact of a life with a mother and father.”Three days later the New York Times ran a self-reflective piece by Frank Litgvoet, a gay man who is raising two adopted children with his male partner, titled “The Misnomer of Motherless Parenting.” Litgvoet deserves tremendous praise for being willing to name the integral flaw in same-sex parenting, despite how promising it looks to gay adults:Being a “motherless” child in an open adoption is not as simple as it looks, because there is a birth mother, who walks in and walks out of the lives of our children. And when she is not physically there, she is—as we know from many accounts of adult adoptees—still present in dreams, fantasies, longings and worries. . . .When the mother walks into the lives of our kids it is mostly a wonderful experience. It is harder for them when she walks out, not only because of the sad goodbye of a beloved adult, but also because it triggers the difficult and painful question of why she walked out in the first place.http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2013/07/10474/?utm_source=RTA+Lopez+abuse&utm_campaign=winstorg&utm_medium=emaillast_img read more

MBB : Second time around: Coming off freshman campaigns, SU’s sophomores bring experience to roster

first_img Published on October 16, 2011 at 12:00 pm Comments Scoop Jardine can understand the expectations placed on the Syracuse basketball team heading into the new season. He gets why the experts are so high on the Orange in spite of a disappointing second-round NCAA Tournament exit last year.And while the fifth-year senior and his fellow upperclassmen, Kris Joseph and Brandon Triche, are major factors in the preseason hype, Jardine pointed out a different group that could be the key for SU this season.‘We’ve only lost one guy,’ Jardine said at SU men’s basketball media day Oct. 14. ‘That’s why a lot of people are saying we’re Final Four caliber. We’ve got everybody back. We’ve got our freshmen, now sophomores, knowing what it takes to win in the Big East and knowing what it takes to finish games. It’s going to be huge for those guys.’The one player SU lost was senior big man Rick Jackson, who averaged a double-double and was arguably the best inside presence in the Big East. And the sophomore class features four players who shined at times last year, but served more as role players during their freshman seasons.Entering the 2011-12 season, though, Syracuse will look to rely heavily on sophomore centers Fab Melo and Baye Moussa Keita to fill the void created by Jackson’s graduation. Their classmates, forward C.J. Fair and guard Dion Waiters, will also look to build on solid freshman seasons and increase their roles with a year under their belts.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘I think the key with these four guys is they all got to play last year,’ head coach Jim Boeheim said Oct. 14. ‘They all contributed. Obviously, Ricky Jackson is the biggest hole we have to replace, and that’s where the two big guys come in. They have to step up and do what Ricky did for us last year. C.J. and Dion played well last year, and you’d expect them to build on that.’After entering Syracuse as one of the top centers in his class and being named the Preseason Big East Rookie of the Year, Melo failed to meet expectations in his first season. He started 24 games but only scored 2.3 points and pulled in 1.9 rebounds per contest.Keita, on the other hand, largely surpassed expectations in his freshman season, even without major contributions on the offensive end of the floor. He averaged more minutes per game than Melo, grabbed 3.7 rebounds per game and finished second on the team with 43 blocks.The job of replacing Jackson appears likely to fall directly on the shoulders of the two sophomore centers. Rakeem Christmas, a 6-foot-9 freshman, could provide some help on the inside, but Boeheim expects his two sophomores to carry the load.Especially considering Jackson played a lot of minutes at center last year, with Melo and Keita adjusting to play at the collegiate level.‘In my experience, centers from freshman to sophomore years take big jumps,’ Boeheim said. ‘I think our centers will take big jumps this year and be much more effective. I think last year was a good learning experience, the fact that they got to play so much as freshmen.’For the Orange, the biggest question could be whether one of those two centers develops into a low-post scoring option. Jackson was a go-to scorer down low and ranked second on the team with 13.1 points per contest. He showed a knack for being able to create his own shot with moves on the inside.Neither Keita nor Melo showed much of an offensive skill set in the post last season. With Jardine, Joseph and Triche running the perimeter offense for Syracuse, adding a scoring option on the blocks would add another dimension for the Orange.‘I’ve been working on my offense and my defense,’ Keita said. ‘Everybody thinks I’m a defensive player. Yeah, I love playing defense but offense, too. Whatever coach (Boeheim) needs me to do, I will do it.’As for Fair and Waiters, their roles are expected to increase since their freshman year. Both served as a spark off the bench last year, with Fair primarily bringing a defensive presence and Waiters showing the ability to score the ball.Fair ranked third on the team with 3.8 rebounds per game, and he averaged the most playing time aside from the Orange’s top four options of Triche, Jardine, Joseph and Jackson. Fair also had a huge game with 16 points and nine rebounds against Pittsburgh, and he scored 17 points and grabbed eight rebounds in a standout performance against Rutgers.Waiters, on the other hand, scored double figures in seven different games off the bench, including a career-best 18 points in SU’s NCAA Tournament loss to Marquette. His ability to slash to the basket added an element that complemented the outside shooting of Triche and Jardine.In all, the four sophomores must provide reliable backup to the three-headed attack of Joseph, Jardine and Triche that will lead Syracuse this season. With their support, the team could be ‘Final Four caliber,’ as Jardine said. But without them, another short postseason run is certainly possible.But they seem confident and ready for the challenge in 2011-12. And Waiters’ attitude entering this season summed up the expectations for himself and the rest of his classmates.‘I got a year under my belt,’ Waiters said. ‘I matured more. I still have maturing to do, but at the end of the day, I just feel like I could have gotten out there and done more. I feel like my opportunities were shorter than what I expected, but this year, it’s a different me, it’s a different team. And we’re just trying to do it.’[email protected]center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Head Coach satisfied with U-18 National Team’s Approach and Commitment to Preparations

first_imgFour training sessions are behind the U-18 national team of Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Football Federation BH Training Centre in Zenica.The chosen players of Slaven Musa are working hard, which was confirmed to us by the goalkeepers’ coach Goran Brašnić:“If we take into account all the circumstances that preceded this gathering and the break that the players had, we can be satisfied with their approach and commitment to these preparations. They played one match between themselves and everyone did his best. Of course, there were a lot of good things, but also some bad ones that still need to be worked on, but the will of the guys to work is at a high level.”Brašnić also commented on the specific working conditions in this period:“We adapt and respect all the guidelines we received from medical experts, as well as measures related to hygiene and health protection. Surfaces that are often touched are constantly disinfected and the staff at the Training Centre regularly cleans all rooms. We also measure temperature regularly. We take care of many things and we don’t have any problems, so the preparations are going in the best way.”The camp ends tomorrow when anthropological testing of players is scheduled.last_img read more

School board approves Ryan Bisio, Graham Johnson as Arcata basketball coaches

first_imgMcKinleyville >> The Northern Humboldt Union School Board voted unanimously to approve Ryan Bisio and Graham Johnson as varsity and junior varsity head coaches, respectively, in a special meeting at McKinleyville High School Monday evening.“In the end, tonight was a celebration of Arcata High basketball,” a relieved Bisio said after a tumultuous week. “There’s a lot of happy people out here tonight and I’m just one of them.”After a lengthy public comment session that saw numerous persons …last_img read more

Cave Climate Conclusions Compromised

first_imgWidely used to infer past climates, isotope measurements from stalactites and stalagmites in caves can mislead researchers.They are among the most useful storytellers of earth history: speleothems, or cave formations. Scientists collect samples from stalactites and stalagmites, take them to their labs, and measure the fractions of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes found in their inclusions of crystals of calcium carbonate or calcite. From these crystal balls, the scientists look far into the past, envisioning climate change and long ages. What could be more straightforward? The data prove it.A funny thing happens on the way to the lab. The isotopic fractionations become altered. Here’s what a team of speleologists (cave scientists) conclude from expeditions into a couple of caves in Hungary.Speleothem deposits are among the most valuable continental formations in paleoclimate research, as they can be dated using absolute dating methods, and they also provide valuable climate proxies. However, alteration processes such as post-depositional mineralogical transformations can significantly influence the paleoclimatic application of their geochemical data.Climate scientists know about some of the alteration processes, but this team points out new ones that have not been appreciated. The paper in Nature‘s open-access journal Scientific Reports concentrates on one alteration process—the transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) to nanocrystalline calcite—but suggests there are other factors that, if not properly accounted for, can have “serious consequences” on the interpretation given the data.Here’s the basic problem with ACC: it depletes the fraction of stable oxygen-18 ions (δ18O) before transforming into crystalline calcite. This happens within a few hours or days, potentially giving wrong readings in the lab when the speleothems are measured. The scientists, therefore, might be measuring different values in their refrigerator samples than the crystal as it was forming in the cave long ago. If they expect their measurements to represent a “proxy” (a measurement standing in for something else, like climate), they could be fooling themselves.Detection of ACC is rather difficult in cave deposits, as ACC can undergo transformation to calcite in minutes in a hydrous environment, and even stabilizing compounds like Mg or organic matter are only capable of extending its stability to some weeks. Taking into consideration the general precipitation rate (0.1 to 1 mm per year), the collection of carbonate in appropriate amounts for mineralogical or geochemical analyses requires several months. Over the course of such a long collection time, however, the original ACC can be transformed into calcite. Although ACC preparation in the laboratory is a routine procedure, its synthesis requires conditions distinctly different from those to be found in natural cave environments, e.g. mixing of CaCl2 and NaCO3 or (NH4)2CO3 solutions. Hence, the preparation conditions and characteristics of synthetic ACC render it inappropriate to function as an analogue of its natural counterpart, thus it cannot provide the information sought.The scientists observed ACC forming onsite in the cave on special collection surfaces. The ACC can exist in open or closed systems, depending on whether the inclusions become embedded within the dripwater, reaching equilibrium. The researchers in the lab will not always be able to tell whether calcite from which they obtain δ18O measurements reflect actual conditions in the cave or altered conditions when the ACC lowered the value during crystallization. The conclusions on which they base dates or paleoclimates could be in error.If this were the only worry, perhaps scientists could learn to correct for it by identifying other proxies for the presence of ACC. Unfortunately, this is not the only concern. ACC formation is a function of temperature, conductivity, pH, CO2 concentration, degassing rate, evaporation rate, drip rate and other factors. Unless these factors are known and controlled, and unless researchers gather their data in actual cave environments, they could be misled.The team also notes that scientists get different equations whether they use theoretical analyses, experimental techniques or empirical observations.Uncertainties in the estimation of ACC amount is a major weakness in the fractionation calculation, hence the verification of calcite-ACC fractionation estimation requires independent information provided either by experimental studies or by natural analogues. The experimental determination of ACC-water oxygen isotope fractionation representative for speleothem formation is challenging because (i) ACC rapidly transforms to calcite during the preparation and (ii) laboratory ACC synthesis requires physical and chemical conditions distinctly different from those found in a cave environment. Available estimations of δ18O differences between crystalline and amorphous carbonates formed in natural environments suggest that the crystalline carbonate is several ‰ more enriched in 18O than its amorphous counterpart (dolomite, aragonite, Mg-calcite).What you actually get may not be what you believe you got. Different caves and different forms of calcium carbonate may give very different results. The paper sounds a warning call to researchers:The present study provides direct evidence for relatively 18O-depleted ACC formation in caves at about 10 °C. Since the δ18O value of inclusion-hosted water may carry significant paleoclimatic/paleohydrological information, it is important to note that its use is limited by the cave environment.The authors add one more source of uncertainty: microbes. They toss out that potentially significant alteration right at the end of the paper, after summarizing reasons why you can’t trust the values in this “most valuable” method of inferring paleoclimates and dates. Oh, and don’t forget the unidentified organic compounds in the dripwater, which can vary significantly from cave to cave and also affect ACC formation.A number of experimental studies have shown that the formation and stability of ACC may be influenced by the physical parameters of the ambient environment and the chemical compositions of the parent solutions. In natural cave environments the most important factors might be the cave temperature, drip water pH, as well as concentrations of Mg, SO42− and organic compounds in the solution. A comprehensive study is suggested to cover several cave environments with different temperatures, ventilation degree, soil characteristics, drip water chemistry and carbonate growth rates in order to determine the exact factors governing ACC formation. The transition from ACC to calcite has been shown to take place in several steps with intermediate hydration states and mineral phases like vaterite. Investigations on the ACC-calcite transition and its governing factors require monitoring of mineralogical changes at high temporal resolution. Additionally to the inorganic factors, the role of microbial activity should also be investigated. Amorphous carbonates are ubiquitously secreted by living organisms in sedimentary environments, hence microbial mediated carbonate precipitation is also a potentially important process in ACC formation, whose exploration requires systematic biological/biochemical investigations.It appears that climatologists leaning on cave data know a lot less than they thought they knew. This final paragraph almost makes it seem like it’s time to toss out the equations and interpretations and start over. Isn’t that implied by “a comprehensive study is suggested” using “systematic biological/biochemical investigations” in multiple caves with varying conditions?Reference: “Formation of amorphous calcium carbonate in caves and its implications for speleothem research” by Attila Demény, Péter Németh, et al., Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 39602 (2016), doi:10.1038/srep39602, published 22 Dec 2016.Remember this paper the next time you are presented with scientific “facts” that prove a scientific “consensus” of one sort or another. The conclusions of any empirical study cannot be divorced from the assumptions that go into those conclusions. A consensus is most dangerous when the conclusion is decided in advance, and scientists within a preferred paradigm go out looking for evidence to confirm it. (Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Creative Inspiration: The History of the Title Sequence

first_imgClassic motion graphic design is displayed in The History of the Title Sequence.In a world of After Effects and Cinema 4D it’s easy to forget how much effort and creativity it took to create motion graphics in a non-digital environment. In his graduate project, motion graphics artist Jurjen Versteeg takes us on a fictitious journey through The History of the Title Sequence and creatively encapsulates the essence of some of the most popular motion graphic designers of the 20th century. The video was created in 2011, but we missed it upon it’s release and thought it too good not share.It should be noted that the entire film was shot over the course of 1 day. Jarjen used a small camera crane to shoot over his shoulder so his hands could be in the shot. The film is a great example of what can be achieved if you have a great idea and put in the necessary pre-production. The following video shows a behind the scenes look at the making of the short film.What do you think of The History of the Title Sequence? Is there anything you would have done differently? Comment below.last_img read more

Behind Moustakas HR, Royals Beat O’s, 6-4

first_imgBALTIMORE — Alcides Escobar doubled in the go-ahead run in the ninth inning, Mike Moustakas extended his home run-binge and Kansas City remained perfect in the playoffs, beating the Baltimore Orioles 6-4 Saturday for a 2-0 lead in the AL Championship Series.Now, the Royals head back to Kansas City with the knowledge that no team has ever lost a best-of-seven LCS after winning the first two games on the road.“We don’t want to be the first team to do that,” designated hitter Billy Butler said. “That’s all I get from that.”Lorenzo Cain had four hits, scored twice and drove in a run for the wild-card Royals, who are 6-0 in the playoffs this year, including 4-0 on the road. The Orioles hadn’t lost two in a row in Baltimore since June 28-29, but Kansas City found a way to quiet the towel-waving, screaming crowds.“The atmosphere here is great. It didn’t affect us,” Butler said. “Now we’ll go home and see if they can play in our atmosphere.”Moustakas homered for the fourth time in five games as the Royals won their ninth straight in the postseason, a string dating to the 1985 World Series.“To come in here and win two games against a great team like that, it’s huge for us,” Moustakas said. “A lot of confidence going back home.”Game 3 is Monday at Kauffman Stadium. Former Oriole Jeremy Guthrie will start for the Royals against either Wei-Yin Chen or Miguel Gonzalez.Manager Buck Showalter’s team has lost two in a row at Camden Yards for the first time since June 28-29, and now the Orioles must buck history to earn its first pennant since 1983. No club has ever won a best-of-seven LCS after dropping the first two games at home.“If one team can do it, it’s us,” slugger Nelson Cruz said.“The series ain’t over,” insisted Adam Jones, who hit his first playoff home run. “If you guys (are) thinking it’s over, why are we going to show up on Monday?”After squeezing out an 8-6 win in 10 innings on Friday night, the Royals again took apart the Baltimore bullpen with a late uprising.With the score tied at 4 in the ninth, Omar Infante beat out an infield roller off Darren O’Day, the losing pitching for the second straight day.Zach Britton entered, and Moustakas laid down a bunt that moved pinch-runner Terrance Gore to second. Alcides then sliced an opposite-field grounder inside first base to bring home Gore.Two batters later, Cain hit an RBI single.At St. Louis, Madison Bumgarner pitched shutout ball into the eighth inning and the San Francisco Giants combined just enough hitting with a couple of defensive errors by St. Louis to beat the Cardinals 3-0 in the NL Championship Series opener.Bumgarner set a major league postseason record with 26 2-3 consecutive scoreless innings on the road.The Giants lefty was in complete command while 20-game winner Adam Wainwright failed to last even five innings for the Cardinals.San Francisco has won 12 of its last 13 in the postseason, including three straight to erase a 3-1 deficit in the 2012 NLCS against St. Louis.Jake Peavy gets the Game 2 start for the Giants on Sunday night against Lance Lynn.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Ohio State holds off Illinois 6255 to end 4game skid

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) goes up for a layup. OSU won against Illinois, 62-55, Jan. 23. Credit: Kaily Cunningham / Multimedia editorA win’s a win.For the No. 17 Ohio State Buckeyes, that’s all that really matters after beating Illinois, 62-55, to put a stop to a four-game losing streak.“We try to do our best to put the losing streak behind us. This game wasn’t about that. It was about trying to come out and find a way to be better than Illinois and that’s our only goal in this game,” senior guard Aaron Craft said after the win. “We wanted to find a way to get better before this game in practice and watching film and we were able to do that. We were a tougher basketball team down the stretch than we have been, and that’s what matters.”A three-point play by junior forward LaQuinton Ross followed by a 3-pointer by senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. (his fourth of the game) and free throws down the stretch helped secure the win for OSU.“I think it was just everybody being connected tonight. I think we had…it was a lot of togetherness tonight. You see guys jumping up and down, you see fans jumping up and down. We was able to get our crowd into it. It felt good to be playing back at home, too. Having that support for you from the crowd,” Ross said. “I think it was just a group effort tonight, everybody did what they had to and pitched in.”Both teams struggled offensively early on, combining to make just five field goals in the opening nine minutes of play.Smith Jr.’s second 3-pointer of the game gave OSU the lead, 24-23, with 57 seconds remaining in the first half, but a dunk on the other end by Illini junior center Nnanna Egwu helped give Illinois the lead at the break.The Buckeyes had as many field goals (seven) as they did fouls in the first half.OSU was able to gain momentum in the second half thanks to a 9-0 run that was topped off by a 3-pointer by junior forward Sam Thompson. That gave the Buckeyes the lead, 40-34, aided by four turnovers in six possessions by the Fighting Illini.Illinois (13-7, 2-5) would not go away quietly though, as it would make back-to-back 3-pointers to stay in the game.Craft would answer with a 3-pointer shortly thereafter, but two baskets by Illinois redshirt-senior guard Joseph Bertrand and a layup by junior guard Tracy Abrams tied the game at 46.Ross would bury a three from the wing, though, and a steal by Smith Jr. lead to a layup by junior guard Shannon Scott that gave OSU a five-point advantage with 3:31 left.The Buckeyes (16-4, 3-4) were able to make enough plays late to hold off Illinois for the win.“I’m just so excited for my team right now. Got a chance to see guys smiling and I miss that,” Smith Jr. said after the win. “As a senior on this team, obviously you want to see your team smiling as much as possible. I can tell you, prior to this game there was no smiles, there was no laughter. There was none of that. Guys were kind of in their shell. And now I feel like everybody’s out now and I’m just looking forward to going forward and playing the next game with a lot of confidence.”Ross led the way for OSU with 18 points, but Smith Jr. wasn’t far behind with 16 of his own. Craft finished with 11 points, six rebounds and five assists.“I think this. Did we play perfect? No, we did not,” OSU coach Thad Matta said. “The thing I liked was I loved our energy on defense. I thought we played extremely hard. I thought we got back to rotating, seeing things the way we need to see them. And that was something going in…you know offensively, first half I’m just like, ‘here we go again.’ When (junior center) Amir (Williams) missed the dunk I’m like ‘maybe this isn’t supposed to be.’ But to the kids credit they had a different look in their eye down the stretch and give the (Schottenstein Center) a ton of (credit). I mean that crowd was as energetic as it could be and really helped us.”Bertrand scored 19 for Illinois in the loss.Next up, the Buckeyes are set to host Penn State (9-10, 0-6) Wednesday at the Schottenstein Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m. read more

New TCI Police sworn in assigned to CID Marine and Tactical

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, August 15, 2017 – Providenciales – Thirteen new Police officers are sworn in now and the new squad will join the Criminal Investigations Department, #CID; Tactical Unit and Marine Branch.    The men and women, hailing from Jamaica and the Philippines are trained and ready for active duty.David Barnett, Marlon Dawkins, Christopher Morrison, Robert McClean, Horace Chung, Renaldo Burke, Monique Brandford, Rory Burke, Dexter Anthony, Marlon Morse, Andrea Lewis and Carl Wynters; and from the Philippines Daphney Alcima were officially sworn in by Commissioner James Smith as Constables.A media release from the Police Force explained, the officers are presently undergoing orientation and an introduction session to the Force’s Code of Conduct.#MagneticMediaNews Related Items:#CID, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more