Five people evacuated from Elkhart home that caught fire

first_img (Source: https://goo.gl/Jt3RT7 License: https://goo.gl/sZ7V7x) Five people were evacuated from a home that caught fire in the 1100 block of Canton Street in Elkhart.Elkhart Fire crews were called to the home just after 12:30 a.m. on Sunday, May 17, to find the occupants out of the building after being alerted by Elkhart Police officers.There was heavy fire on the exterior rear of the house that was extending into the soffit area and smoke coming from the soffit areas.The fire was quickly extinguished on the exterior of the house.There was a delay in looking for fire extension due the electrical supply wires being damaged by the fire in that area and had to wait for AEP to disconnect power at the power pole.There was found to be no extension into the attic area.There were no working smoke detectors inside the structure.There five occupants displaced were assisted by the Red Cross.The cause of the fire is under investigation at this time Five people evacuated from Elkhart home that caught fire Google+ By Jon Zimney – May 17, 2020 0 427 Pinterest Twitter Google+ Pinterest IndianaLocalNews Twitter Facebook Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleMichigan has new hotline for employers, workers COVID-19 questions, concernsNext articleMan, 18, drives into pond at Edison Lakes Parkway and Park Place Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

No spitting, no fans: baseball restarts S. Korea’s sports season

first_imgTopics : Another online user said: “This doesn’t feel like the opening of a season at all. I’m watching baseball from home, hugging a pillow.”At the stadium, strict health checks and hygiene measures were enforced.Players must have their temperature checked twice before games, with face masks to be worn in all areas except the playing field and the dugouts, according to the KBO.Players have also been asked not to shake hands or exchange high-fives, while spitting is prohibited — putting a new complexion on what is South Korea’s most popular spectator sport. Instead, banners with photos of masked fans stretched across the empty bleachers at the Incheon-based SK Wyverns club’s Munhak Baseball Stadium.Banners carrying messages for victory were also put up at the LG Twins club’s Jamsil derby in Seoul, saying: “Even if we are apart, we are TWINS.”Fans were divided over the unprecedented format.”Baseball is finally back! But I wonder when I can actually go to the stadium,” tweeted one fan. US tunes in ESPN announced it will show six KBO League games per week to fans pining for live baseball in the US, while broadcasters in 10 foreign territories have snapped up rights to air K-League matches.South Korea endured one of the worst early outbreaks of the disease outside China, prompting professional sports to suspend or delay their seasons.But the country appears to have brought its outbreak under control thanks to an extensive “trace, test and treat” program.The start-up will bring welcome live action in a barren sports world where fans have had to make do with sports channels and broadcasters airing repeats of past events.The K-League, originally due to start in February, will kick off Friday with a blockbuster clash between Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors, champions for the past three seasons, against FA Cup winners Suwon Bluewings.And South Korea will next week become the first country to see women’s professional golf resume after COVID-19.South Korean players dominate women’s golf with eight featuring in the world’s top 20, including number one Ko Jin-young.The $1.8 million the Korea Ladies Professional Golf Association (KLPGA) Championship begins on May 14 in Yangju, east of Seoul with world number six Kim Sei-young and 10th-ranked Lee Jeong-eun in the 144-strong field.South Korea has been seeing only a trickle of new coronavirus infections in recent days, with three fresh cases reported on Tuesday taking the total to 10,804. South Korea’s professional sport returned to action after the coronavirus shutdown with the opening of a new baseball season Tuesday, while football and golf will soon follow suit in a ray of hope for suspended competitions worldwide.Friday will see the delayed start of football’s K-League, and next week some of golf’s leading women players will tee up in a domestic tournament as South Korea becomes a rare hotspot for live sport.Fans were not allowed in when any of Tuesday’s five opening Korean Baseball Organization (KBO) matches saw the first pitches thrown, a marked contrast from the packed stadiums of previous years when fans sang and cheered relentlessly no matter the score.last_img read more

Arsenal legend Wright says Saka played out of position

first_img Originally a winger, the 18-year-old got his break in the first-team this season by playing left-back. Asked if Saka could become the next Ashley Cole, Wright said: “For me he’s a better winger. “It’s just because of his ability and how good he is that he can play that position. “Ashley turned out to be one of the best full-backs in the world but this guy is better further forward.” Saka has yet to sign a extension on his current which expires in 2021.Advertisement Loading… And Wright thinks the Englishman should hold out for the best deal. “He’s right him and his representatives to hold out as best they can because he’s the future of the club,” added Wright. “They cannot afford to let a player like this leave, When you look at what Callum Hudson-Odoi has done and he’s a year younger. read also:‘Why Saka will make England’s 2021 European Championship squad’ “The contract he signed, Saka’s representatives will be saying: ‘Why should I sign for any less?’ “I believe he will sign but I do think him and his reps are doing the right thing by dragging it out to get the best deal they can. Arsenal is the right place for him at the moment.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Arsenal legend, Ian Wright, thinks Bukayo Saka should be playing further forward.last_img read more

Bulldogs Tennis Results

first_imgThe Batesville Varsity Tennis team defeated Franklin Co. 4-1 on Tuesday while the JV won 3-1.  On Thursday, Batesville defeated Columbus East 4-1 in varsity action while the JV won 5-0.  The varsity will compete in the Columbus North Invitational on Saturday. Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Mike McKinney.last_img

Noah’s Ark Claim Not Trustworthy

first_img(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A creationist group in Hong Kong is releasing a dramatic documentary filled with fantastic claims about the discovery of Noah’s Ark on Mt. Ararat.  Other prominent creationists are warning of fraud and scientific malpractice.The two whistleblowers have no antipathy to the subject.  They would love real evidence of Noah’s Ark, knowing full well how powerful such evidence would be for the historicity of the Genesis Flood account.  Nevertheless, they have found it necessary, at personal risk, to call attention to fraudulent practices such as selective reporting, doctoring evidence and reliance on unscrupulous characters by the Hong Kong based group NAMI (Noah’s Ark Ministries International).1.  Dr. Carl Wieland of Creation Ministries International has just written a lengthy article, “The ‘Hong Kong Ark’ fiasco – an overview to date (May 2012)” after personally visiting with the NAMI team.2. Dr. Randall Price, a Biblical archaeologist, author, and ark researcher, also wrote a lengthy PDF document at his site, World of the Bible.A wise old preacher of righteousness, Dr. Bob Jones, Sr., said, “It is never right to do wrong to get a chance to do right.”  Good intentions can never atone for misconduct.  Integrity is essential for science and any scholarly enterprise.  We urge NAMI to come clean on their evidence, refrain from hype, and admit wrongdoing, even though millions of dollars are at stake for them after their fundraising and promotion.  Meanwhile, help those deceived by their claims to learn the facts.last_img read more

South Africa’s Public Protector

first_imgThe Public Protector was set up in terms of South Africa’s Constitution to investigate complaints against government agencies or officials.The Public Protector is subject only to the Constitution and the law and is independent of government and any political party. Advocate Busisiwe Mkhwebane is South Africa’s fourth Public Protector since October 2016. (Image: Public Protector, Facebook)Here’s a comprehensive guide to how the process works, who and what the Public Protector can investigate, and how to lay a complaint.The Public Protector receives and investigates complaints from the public against government agencies or officials, and has the power to recommend corrective action and to issue reports.The Public Protector’s services are free and available to all and, if you lay a complaint, your name will so far as possible be kept confidential.The Public Protector is appointed by the President, on the recommendation of the National Assembly, in terms of the Constitution, for a non-renewable period of seven years.Website: http://www.pprotect.org/The Public Protector is subject only to the Constitution and the law and is independent of government and any political party. No person or organ of state may interfere with the functioning of the Public Protector’s office.How does the Public Protector work?Anyone can complain to the Public Protector, who will then investigate the complaint. Think of the Public Protector as a referee who can look at all sides of a problem. If the Public Protector finds that your complaint is justified, he/she will do whatever possible to find a solution to the problem, which includes recommending changes to the system.The Public Protector can also report the matter to Parliament, which will debate the matter and see to it that the recommendations are followed.Investigations are mostly done informally, but the Public Protector can summons people to give evidence under oath or affirmation when this becomes necessary.Complainants should not fear being victimized for “blowing the whistle” on corrupt or improper practices.All information that comes to Public Protector – including the identity of complainants and their sources of information – is treated as confidential.Who can the Public Protector investigate?The Public Protector is independent of government or political parties and can investigate:Government at any level. This includes central and provincial government, state departments and local authorities.Any person performing a public function. This includes anyone performing any official duty which affects South Africans, for example a state employee such as a policeman or an electoral officer.Corporations or companies where the state is involved, for example Eskom and Telkom.Statutory councils, for example the Human Sciences Research Council or the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.What can the Public Protector investigate?The Public Protector is tasked with investigating improper prejudice suffered by the complainant or another person, for example as a result of:Abuse of power.Unfair, capricious, discourteous or other improper conduct.Undue delay.The violation of a human right.Any other decision taken, or situation brought about, by the authorities.Maladministration.Dishonesty or improper dealings with respect to public money.Improper enrichment.Receipt of improper advantage.What won’t the Public Protector investigate?Complaints outside of the Public Protector’s mandate include:Judgments by judges and magistrates, including sentences imposed by them.Private acts by individuals.Private companies.Doctors or lawyers who are not working for the state.However, the staff of the Public Protector can help by telling you where to complain or what to do in such cases.In certain cases the Public Protector may refer you to a court of law where going to court is the best way to deal with the problem. Since the Public Protector does not act as anyone’s legal representative, you will be referred to a lawyer if the matter must go to court.How do I lay a complaint?Should your complaint be about prejudice, you should try to solve the problem yourself before complaining to the Public Protector, for example by:Speaking to the official(s) involved; or, if that does not helpWriting to the person in charge of the official(s), for example the head of the department, or the chief executive director, or the town clerk.You could also consider approaching your Member of the National or Provincial Parliament. Only then, if you are still unable to solve the problem, should you make a submission to the Public Protector. You can do this by:Toll free line: 0800 11 20 40Customer service line: (012) 366-7142Email: [email protected] in an online formThe following information should be contained in your submission:The nature of your complaint.The background to your complaint.Reasons why you feel your complaint should be investigated by the Public Protector.Steps you have taken to solve the problem yourself (if applicable). You should mention names of the officials you have been dealing with, on what dates, and what was said. Copies of any correspondence between you and the officials should be attached to your letter.A telephone number where you can be contacted, if you have one.In some instances the Public Protector may require a statement under oath before investigating.If you are unsure whether your problem is something the Public Protector will investigate, or if you cannot write, you can phone the Public Protector’s office on 0800 11 20 40 (toll free), or visit http://www.pprotect.org/ for other numbers. There are trained professional staff members who will listen to your complaint, big or small, and conduct investigations.In some cases the staff can help people to find quick solutions to their problems. The staff can also tell you where to complain if the Public Protector cannot help you.You could also visit the office for an interview or a consultation, if you prefer. It is better to write first and ask for an interview in the letter.Who is South Africa’s Public Protector?Advocate Busisiwe Mkhwebane became South Africa’s fourth Public Protector in October 2016. She was appointed by President Jacob Zuma, after being recommended by a special parliamentary committee.Mkhwebane is an advocate of the high court and a specialist in refugee and immigration law. She has held positions in the Department of Home Affairs and the South African embassy in the Republic of China. She previously also worked in the Office of the Public Protector as a senior investigator and an acting provincial director for Gauteng. Mkhwebane was also a senior researcher at the South African Human Rights Commission.Mkhwebane replaced Advocate Thulisile Madonsela, who completed her term in October 2016. Madonsela replaced Advocate Lawrence Mushwana, who completed his seven-year term as Public Protector on 16 October 2009. South Africa’s first Public Protector, Advocate Selby Baqwa, served from 1995 to 2002.Updated October 2016Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

PIOJ at Halfway Point in Phase Two of Climate Change Project

first_img Implementation of the SPCR project is expected to span four years. Story Highlights The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is currently midway through implementing Phase II of a US$25 million Strategic Programme for Climate Resilience (SPCR).The programme, being implemented as a pilot (Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience (PPCR), aims to boost government-led efforts to strengthen Jamaica’s ability to withstand the often damaging effects of risks associated with climate-related occurrences such as hurricanes, storms, and droughts, on the island’s infrastructure and other assets, and the resulting costs.The SPCR is expected to demonstrate the measures to achieve these strengthened capacities and how they can be incorporated into the implementation of core development policies and planning.Implementation of the SPCR is consistent with the government’s 2013/14 job creation and economic growth strategic priority, focusing on facilitating protection of the natural environment.The PPCR/SCPR’s roll out is deemed timely as Jamaica has, over time, sustained significant dislocation due to the impact of climate-related hazards. This has been most evident over the last 12 years, during which the island incurred damage and losses, estimated at some $150 billion, resulting from the passage of some 11 storms or hurricanes.Frequent extreme, unusual, and irregular weather patterns associated with climate change, have been attributed to global warming. The latter occurrence is defined as a rise in the average atmospheric or oceanic temperature resulting from increased presence of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.This, to a great extent, is caused by activities such as the burning of fossil fuels, like petroleum products, and deforestation. Research determines that these factors influence weather patterns resulting in hurricanes, storms, heavy rainfall or even drought. In several instances, countries are also under the threat of rising sea levels.When activities such as inappropriate farming practices and construction, particularly of houses in areas not deemed ideal for this undertaking, are factored in, they can and often lead to devastating occurrences such as flooding and landslides or slippages.In recognition of the long-term risks these pose for Jamaica, government-led efforts are being undertaken to strengthen the country’s ability to, as best as possible, withstand the effects of these situations. These include implementation of the PPCR/SPCR.Jamaica is one of six Caribbean countries invited by a regional PPCR/SPCR sub-committee to participate in the undertaking. The committee comprises representatives of the project’s main multilateral funding partners – the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).They are financing the undertaking through a Climate Investment Fund (CIF) facility, established for this purpose. The other countries involved are: Grenada, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, and Haiti.Jamaica’s programme is being financed at a cost of US$25 million by the World Bank and IDB, comprising US$15 million in grant funding, and a US$10 million concessionary loan.Manager for Sustainable Development and Regional Planning at the PIOJ, Hopeton Peterson, tells JIS News that the PPCR/SPCR is being implemented in two phases. The first, he informs, entailed design development for and preparation of three investment projects, as well as several scheduled technical studies being undertaken to support climate change adaptation in Jamaica.He explains that Investment Project I (IP I), for which US6.8 million in grant funding was allocated, deals with improving climate data and information management, which he describes as “very important” because “we need data to facilitate good planning.”Investment Project II (IP II), funded through a US$7.7 million grant, relates to the application of adaptation measures in a specified watershed identified, in this case, the Rio Minho River basin and watershed in Clarendon.Mr. Peterson informs that a loan of US$3.6 million is being also been allocated for this component to boost the National Meteorological Service’s operational capacity, which entailed, among other things, acquisition of a radar.A total of US$6.4 million in loan funds was earmarked for Investment Project III (IP III) which he says, will finance adaptation initiatives for community-based organizations, and micro, small and medium size enterprises (MSMEs).Phase II of the PPCR/SPCR, Mr Peterson outlines will entail implementation of the activities to be undertaken during the latter part of the 2013/14 financial year.Mr. Peterson points to several benefits, which will arise from this undertaking. The technical reports, he explains, will assist national efforts in mainstreaming climate change in priority sectors, such as tourism, agriculture, and water resources, among others, and support the design of attendant adaptation measures.Additionally, the studies will help to build and strengthen sectoral capacity for planning and forecasting, as well as support climate change education and awareness.“The direct beneficiary is the country, because the entire population will be impacted by whatever decisions are made with the use of these data,” he outlines.For the second project, Mr. Peterson says residents of communities, especially farmers in the Upper Rio Minho watershed area, will benefit. Other beneficiary districts include Bog Hole, Kellits, and adjoining areas.He explains that the Rio Minho was selected as a pilot, primarily because “it is one of the most highly degraded watersheds in Jamaica.” This has been attributed mainly to factors such as improper land use, less than ideal cultivation practices, and deforestation.“It’s a farming area and most vulnerable to the effects of both climate change and climate variability. One of the critical issues relates to water adequacy to do their farming; so the project is also looking at ways of improving water storage for these communities to better deal with (factors such as) drought,” he informs.Mr. Peterson points out that the project’s implementation is “based on community participation”. He says prior to commencing the project design, PIOJ representatives visited targeted communities to find out how climate change/variations were affecting the residents and the solutions they have been exploring for implementation.“We made some proposals; but communities also came forward with ideas and strategies of their own. Some of the things that they are doing include planting crops that are more resistant to drought, and storing water, using tanks. They are also changing their planting periods to fit with the changes in rainfall cycle, for example. These are some of the practical measures that they have been putting in place,” he discloses.Having completed work in phase one of the PPCR/SPCR, Mr. Peterson advises that a project report and proposals are being prepared for submission to the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) for their consideration.In addition to the initial amount allocated in the SPCR, Jamaica has received a further US$5 million in grant funding through the Climate Investments Fund (CIF) to continue the project undertaking.“It (submission) will go through their (IDB) approval process; therefore, once it is approved, we will have disbursement of funds and we can then start with the implementation, which we anticipate will start in 2014,” Mr. Peterson informs.Implementation of the SPCR project, he tells JIS News, is expected to span four years, adding that once the projects are successfully executed, “we would have partially achieved our objectives as the real test is to see whether or not the activities can be sustained.”“We expect to have climate change mainstreamed in government and private sector operations and anticipate, as well, that we would have some adaptation strategies in the Rio Minho watershed. We also anticipate that we would have the climate resilience of communities strengthened by implementing climate change adaptation projects, and also MSMEs strengthened and becoming more resilient to climate change,” Mr. Peterson informs.He points out that once these targets have been attained and the strengths and weaknesses assessed to determine which project(s) can be implemented elsewhere, then, “we would move onto doing that.”“We have sustainability measures built into the programme. So if the projects are successfully implemented, then we look to scale those up, in which case we would need to get additional funding. So we would have to try and leverage additional funds to continue the implementation of the successful activities,” Mr. Peterson adds. The PIOJ is currently midway through implementing Phase II of a US$25m Strategic Programme for Climate Resilience (SPCR). Implementation of the SPCR is consistent with the government’s 2013/14 job creation and economic growth strategic priority.last_img read more