Sharks suffer another ugly loss, but do not want to see major changes

first_imgBOSTON — The Sharks never really gave themselves a chance Tuesday night against the Boston Bruins, losing 5-1 at TD Garden to bring an unceremonious end to a five-game road trip and one of the uglier opening months of the regular season in recent team history.Martin Jones, under siege for most of the night, had 36 saves as the Sharks finished with the road trip with a 1-3-1 record and ended the month of October at 4-8-1.Continuing a nearly season-long problem, the Sharks had to kill five …last_img read more

Bioprospecting to aid N Cape community

first_img30 July 2012The Komaggas community in South Africa’s Northern Cape province stands to benefit in both monetary and non-monetary terms from the bioprospecting permits that Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa awarded to seven community organisations last week.The permits will allow these organisations, who work with plants, to legally engage in bioprospecting activities.Bioprospecting involves searching for, collecting and deriving genetic material from samples of biodiversity that can be used in commercialised pharmaceutical, agricultural, industrial, or chemical processing end products.South Africa’s competitive edgeAwarding the permits at a local community hall in Komaggas, Molewa said the South African benefits of biodiversity or ecosystems services were estimated at R73-billion, contributing 7% of the country’s gross domestic product per year.“The biodiversity economy, which is part of our green economy, is therefore our competitive edge in growing our economy and addressing climate change adaption,” she said.South Africa’s Bioprospecting, Access and Benefit Sharing Regulatory Framework: Guidelines for Providers, Users and Regulators was also launched at the ceremony.The legal framework provides a huge opportunity for economic growth, sustainable development and poverty alleviation.Rich in biological and cultural diversityMolewa said South Africa had a rich natural and cultural resource base that ranked among the top three in the world.“We are home to approximately 24 000 plants species and have an entire floral kingdom within our borders. South Africa is not just rich in biological diversity but also blessed with a rich cultural diversity.”Molewa said many widely used cosmetics produced by industries were derived from medicinal plants, and many of these plants were indigenous and endemic to South Africa.“We must build a shared appreciation of the importance of medicinal plants resources to human health and well-being and a shared concern about the conservation and sustainable use of these resources,” she said.According to the department, researchers have successfully cultivated a selection of naturally occurring Sceletium as a new commercial crop on a large scale and developed a standardised extract known as Zembrin, which is manufactured to the European Union’s Good Manufacturing Practice (EU-GMP).The plant is associated with the treatment of anxiety, stress, mood and cognition.Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Gov’t Adds $1 Billion to Budget for Early Childhood and Special Education

first_imgMinister of Education, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, said that an additional $1billion has been added to the upcoming budget for special and early childhood education.“We are adding it so that our little children can get the best…we wish we could do more,” the Minister stated. He was speaking at the official opening of the Accompong Basic School in St. Elizabeth on Wednesday, March 20. Rev. Thwaites said the Government is making early childhood education a priority and stressed the need for increased partnerships at this level.“We need all the partnerships that we can get, and we welcome them. Basic education is where we have to start as we must do it right the first time. We could do so much more if we only understand that we must not leave basic education alone, we must give it the priority that it needs,” he stated.He urged the parents to begin now to save for their children’s secondary and tertiary education through a credit union or other financial institution.Meanwhile, the Minister said that aspects of the maroon culture and history will be included in the civics curriculum during the next school year.He said that while the programme started with the Rt. Excellent Marcus Garvey, “we will be following on with all of the heroes and drawing lessons from them.”The Accompong Basic School was built by Food For the Poor as part of its initiative to construct 50 early childhood institutions across the island to mark Jamaica’s 50th year of Independence.It boasts three spacious classrooms, to comfortably accommodate up to 100 students, a sick bay, teachers’ office, and is equipped with child-friendly furniture.By Garfield Angus, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

Only 10 per cent of Haitians crossing illegally getting refugee status so

first_imgOTTAWA – The majority of asylum seekers who have crossed illegally into Canada so far this year were Haitian and so far, only 10 per cent of their claims have been accepted, newly released data showed Wednesday.Since February, the Immigration and Refugee Board has received 14,467 claims in total from what they call irregular border crossers, and the overall acceptance rate sits at 60 per cent.The fact that the number of successful Haitian claims is “very low” should serve as a cautionary tale for those still contemplating crossing into Canada illegally from the U.S. to seek asylum, said Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen.“Coming to Canada first of all has to be done through regular channels, and secondly the asylum system is only for people who are in genuine need of protection,” Hussen said.“It’s not for everyone.”People have been crossing into Canada between official checkpoints in increasing numbers since the start of the year, but the summer months saw a major surge after the U.S. government notified those who hold temporary protected status in that country that their status would be under review.Just under 60,000 Haitians are covered by the policy that protects against deportation. In the weeks after the Trump administration’s initial announcement, some began making the trek north to Canada to try and seek asylum here, propelled in part by misinformation online suggesting Canada has special programs for those affected by the policy.At one point in late July and early August, the number surged to upwards of 250 a day. The rate has since fallen dramatically, but fears it could spike again ramped up this week as the U.S. announced it is in fact ending the policy for Haitians, known as TPS, as of July 2019.“We’re continuing to plan ahead,” Hussen said Wednesday.That includes a meeting scheduled Thursday with federal and provincial officials overseeing the asylum issue at the border. Among other things, they’ll review the statistics from the IRB, which break down the claims by country of alleged persecution.Haiti is at the top with 6,304 claims in total. Only 298 have been finalized, 29 accepted. Next is Nigeria, with 1,911 claims overall, and after that is Turkey at 631.Those whose claims are rejected do have avenues of appeal, and if those fail, they face deportation.Hussen said he didn’t know how many border crossers were pursuing appeals, nor how many — if any — had been removed from Canada. He said people often choose to leave voluntarily, but didn’t know whether that was the case for any members of the summer cohort.After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Canada had temporarily paused deportation to the country. But Canada resumed deportations this year.Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel said she’s troubled by the fact that only a fraction of the claims received by the IRB have been heard. Of the over 14,000 they’ve received, they’ve only finalized 1,572.“The IRB is so backlogged, it will get out into the community — you can enter the country illegally, and not have your case heard for a significant period of time while still being able to access social support services,” Rempel said.“To me, the government is going to have to get on top of that quickly.”last_img read more