Michael Weintrob’s Iconic ‘InstrumentHead’ Photo Exhibit To Return During Jazz Fest

first_imgPhotographer Michael Weintrob has been working in the music industry for twenty-plus years. Since his early days, shooting bands at the Aggie Theatre in Fort Collins while attending Colorado State University, he has allowed his creative juices flow, and back in 2000, while he taking photos of The Derek Trucks Band, the earliest beginnings of his beloved InstrumentHead project was born.The photographer, a staple of New Orleans Jazz Fest, will once again deliver a pop-up exhibit at Jacques Imo’s gallery space from April 27th to May 6th (info here), featuring his collection of works—including images of Bootsy Collins, Mickey Hart, Junior Brown, Scott Avett of the Avett Brothers, Anders Osborne, and more—and live music from some of his longtime musician friends from NOLA and outside the Crescent City.The exhibit will open on April 27th with live performances from Papa Mali and Bobby Vega, which will begin at 9 p.m. and benefit the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic & Assistance Foundation, an organization that “offers occupational and comprehensive health services for musicians, performers, cultural workers and tradition bearers of New Orleans.” Following the opening-night ceremonies, on Saturday, April 28th, Weintrob’s InstrumentHead exhibit will host a trio of performances, including a solo set from Eric McFadden, a Billy Iuso & Eddie Christmas duo set, and a performance by Will Bernard.Right around Jazz Fest time last year, Weintrob released the official InstrumentHead book, a collection of portraits published by Magnet Bound Press and that includes images of 369 musicians and their instruments. The 11” x 15” full-color book comes with the choice of three different cover options. The book will be on-sale at the exhibit, with Michael Weintrob on hand for a special book signing session as well.We had an opportunity to discuss the InstrumentHead project, the NOLA exhibit, and more with the legendary photographer. Check out what he had to say below!Live For Live Music: How did the concept for this long-time project take form?Michael Weintrob: I was a house photographer at the Aggie Theatre in Fort Collins, Colorado, in the late 90s and early 2000s. The Derek Trucks Band performed there one night in 2000, and I was taking a portrait of the band backstage after their show. Todd Smallie, the bassist, came a little late and had his bass. I said, “Do something crazy. I don’t know put your bass down your shirt.” So he did. From then on out, it became part of my creative process when doing portrait shoots with bands. It wasn’t like I was hit by a bolt of lighting and the InstrumentHead project was born. It was just something I did in photo shoots. It was one of my licks as a photographer.I moved to Brooklyn in 2003 seeking a new life experience, and to learn more about the pro photography world. I met with editors at Spin, Vibe, Rolling Stone, Time, and others. They all basically told me the same thing: that was that my live music photography was excellent, but if I wanted to be a portrait photographer in NYC, I needed to do some studying and find my voice. Over the next five years, I learned about lighting and shooting in the studio. I started shooting these faceless portraits in a controlled lighting situation. The images ended up on album covers, such as George Porter Jr.’s It’s Life and Karl Denson’s Lunar Orbit, and were used for promotional images.In 2008, I wandered into a bookstore on Bedford Avenue and saw a coffee table book with a beautiful cover featuring all of these awesome bands logos on it. I opened it up, and it was a fine art book made by photographer James Mollison called The Disciples. Mollison had photographed fans of bands, and the idea was to be able to tell which bands they were fans of by their appearance. All of the images were shot with the same lighting, look, and background. I thought it was brilliant. I wondered how I could create a guessing game with musicians and photography. I realized that I had been shooting these faceless portraits the whole time.That is the moment I decided to start focusing on this as an ongoing art project. I started contacting musicians I had relationships with from shooting bands for so many years. Eventually, I met their friends and then their friends. I would say to them, “How are we going to tell your story? What is it about you that makes you special?” The musicians would show up with their instruments, clothes, and props that would help to tell the story of who they are.I eventually started traveling around the country using music venues as my studio because they were big open rooms that were empty during the day. In most of the cities I would travel to, I knew a couple of musicians who lived there, and I put a call out looking for musicians who were known for their instrument, look, and style. In 2014, I traveled to Nashville and shot over 35 local musicians who lived in the area for a big exhibit I was going to do at OZ Arts Nashville. My goal was always to do a book of this work. I had met with many book publishers who really did not get it. In 2015, I decided to launch a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to produce the book. In 45 days, I raised the funds to make my own book with my own publishing company I formed called Magnet Bound Press.What Is InstrumentHead?[via Instrumenthead]L4LM: What are a few of the most memorable photo sessions you have had with the InstrumentHead project? Michael Weintrob: There are so many memorable shoots. I like them all for different reasons. The best part about doing this work is the personal connection that I have made with the musicians while shooting these portraits—breaking down walls to get to the real person is what I love. Some of the shoots that stick out in my mind are shooting Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead at his home studio, Bootsy Collins in Cincinnati, Uncle Lionel Batiste and Big Chief Monk Boudreaux at Preservation Hall, Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth of the Tom Tom Club and Talking Heads in my studio in Brooklyn, Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi at my Brooklyn Studio, the great South African bass player Bakithi Kumalo backstage at the Capetown Jazz Festival, Bill Summers of the Headhunters, Big Chief Donald Harrison in Bill’s home studio in New Orleans, and Johnny Winter at the Carriage House Studios in Stamford when he was recording his final record.L4LM: It seems like New Orleans, especially during Jazz Fest, is the perfect atmosphere for such an exhibit to return back to. How has the city influenced your own art and life over the years?MW: This will be my twentieth year going to New Orleans during Jazz Fest time. For many years, I would shoot the festival during the day and stay out all night shooting the late-night concerts. I still do the daytime shoots on the fairgrounds and some night shows. I have formed so many relationships with people in the music scene in New Orleans. The sites and sounds of the city are infectious. I have had the great honor of working with some of the cities most influential musicians.In 2013, I showed a large-scale exhibit of my InstrumentHead work for the first time on Frenchman Street in the warehouse behind the Frenchman Street Art Market. It was the perfect storm in the perfect location. Over seven-thousand people saw my work that year. I have had so much support from the musicians of New Orleans and the fans of their music. Jazz Fest time is my favorite time of the year to be in the city.L4LM: New Orleans is all about community, and this exhibit will help benefit the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic & Assistance Foundation. How important is it to you to help a local cause such as this?MW: I have been working with the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic for over a decade. I believe that all of us in the music scene, from photographers to musicians to the production crew, all eat from the same table. NOMC helps musicians with healthcare when they can not afford it. They are a charity that does good work for the community with the funds that they raise. I have a great relationship with Bethany Bultman and Erica Dudas who run the clinic. We have been helping each other for years.L4LM: An opening night celebration featuring Papa Mali & Bobby Vega will kick your upcoming InstrumentHead exhibit during Jazz Fest off, followed by an equally special event on Saturday, April 28th, with a solo set from Eric McFadden, a Billy Iuso & Eddie Christmas duo set, and a performance byWill Bernard. Sounds like a solid group of musician friends to have!MW: I am really looking forward to it! I have known all of these guys for many years. Throughout my career as a photographer in the music scene, I have developed relationships with many great musicians. I am so excited to be able to create this hang on Oak Street and that all these musicians are open to coming and playing their music in my gallery space. Over the full two week exhibit, there will be musicians popping in to perform.L4LM: Thank you so much for the in-depth responses, Michael. We wish you the best of luck down in NOLA with the InstrumentHead exhibit this year!Check out Weintrob’s InstrumentHead website for more information on the photographer. For more information about his upcoming InstrumentHead exhibit at Jacques Imo’s gallery in New Orleans during Jazz Fest, join the Facebook Event page. Order the InstrumentHead book here.last_img read more

Karen Ann (Bowen) Weimer, 79

first_imgKaren Ann Bowen Weimer, 79, of Greensburg passed away on May 17, 2020 at Aspen Place. She was born on May 25, 1940 in Clinton County, Indiana, the daughter of James and Joan (Goldsberry) Bowen. Karen was a 1958 graduate of Frankfort High School and a 1962 graduate of IU School of Nursing.   On August 26, 1962 she married Dr. Larry Weimer and together they had three children: Jennifer, Suzanne, and Matt. Karen was an active member of the community. She loved to sing in the Choir and Praise Team at the United Methodist Church. She was a member of the Tree County Players and Tree City Singers. She loved doing philanthropy work with Psi Iota Xi. She loved animals.Karen was a wonderful mother, wife and friend; the poem Afterglow is how she would want us to celebrate her memory. Afterglow, I’d like the memory of me to be a happy one. I’d like to leave an afterglow of smiles. When life is done I’d like to leave an echo whispering. Softly down the ways, of happy times and laughing times and bright sunny days. I’d like the tears of those who grieve, to dry before the sun of happy memories that I leave when life is done.Survivors include: Husband, Dr. Larry Weimer; Daughters, Jennifer (Don) Blankman and Suzanne Weimer; Son, Matt Weimer; and Grandsons, Michael and David Blankman.Family and Friends are welcome to attend the Virtual Funeral on Facebook Live, Thursday May 21, 2020 at 3:00 pm. Rev. Jon Porter will be officiating. Immediately following the funeral, the family will welcome friends in a drive thru style visitation from 4:00 pm until 6:00 pm. Memorial contributions can be made to the Our Hospice of Decatur County or to the Decatur County Animal Shelter. Online condolences can be made to the family at ww.gilliland-howe.comlast_img read more

Stokes and Hales named in England one-day squad for Australia

first_imgLONDON, England (Reuters) – Ben Stokes has been included in England’s one-day squad for the five-match series in Australia despite being under suspension.Stokes is currently unable to play for his country pending a decision on whether to charge him in connection with an altercation outside a Bristol nightclub in September.But he has been named in the 16-man squad for the ODI series starting next month after selectors were given “clear guidance to name their strongest squad”.He is joined by Alex Hales, who was also suspended after the Bristol incident but has since been told he can play for England after police confirmed he would not face criminal charges.Both players could yet face disciplinary action by the England and Wales Cricket Board.But with Stokes’ situation still not determined, he may not feature in the five-match one-day series, let alone the current Ashes series.The England all-rounder is currently in New Zealand, where he is playing for Canterbury after being granted dispensation by the ECB.With no decision yet made on whether to prosecute him, his chances of featuring in the Ashes, which has three Tests remaining, are diminishing.“Should the ECB Board receive formal confirmation that Ben Stokes has either been charged or that he will face no charges, they would convene within 48 hours to make a decision on his availability for the team at that stage,” the ECB said.Also in the one-day squad are Kent batsman Sam Billings and Yorkshire’s David Willey, who is selected ahead of Essex’s Ravi Bopara.The first one-day international is in Melbourne on January 14.England squad: Eoin Morgan (Middlesex) (capt.), Moeen Ali (Worcestershire), Jonathan Bairstow (Yorkshire), Jake Ball (Nottinghamshire), Sam Billings (Kent), Jos Buttler (Lancashire), Tom Curran (Surrey), Alex Hales (Nottinghamshire), Liam Plunkett (Yorkshire), Adil Rashid (Yorkshire), Joe Root (Yorkshire), Jason Roy (Surrey), Ben Stokes (Durham), David Willey (Yorkshire), Chris Woakes (Warwickshire), Mark Wood (Durham).last_img read more

Boys lacrosse Warriors, Northstars fall to F-M

first_imgBut at the worst possible time, Liverpool hit a drought, blanked in the third quarter as the Hornets grabbed a 6-4 lead. And the visitors would hang on, even though the Warriors shut them out in the final period.Much of the production came from Ryan McGowan, who had three goals, and Kyle Caves, who had a goal and three assists. Brendan Mancuso had the other goal, with Jacob Fahey and Jake Piseno getting assists.Liam O’Neil had 14 saves, the same number as F-M’s goalie duo of Ben Hammond and Jack Van Valkenburgh. Jack Shanley and K.C. Miller led the Hornets with two goals apiece. That same night, C-NS would face Baldwinsville at Bragman Stadium, and get overwhelmed from the outset as it lost 21-5 to the Bees.Anthony Cimino was the lone Northstars player to score twice. Single goals went to Matt Cramer, Conner Lynch and Justin Griffith, with Josh Pickard adding an assist. Joe Bartolo and Austin O’Hara combined to make nine saves.After a pair of good performances that did not translate into wins on the field, Liverpool did prevail 18-12 over Syracuse on Thursday night, outscoring the Cougars 11-1 over the course of the second and third quarters to establish a 15-4 advantage.Despite some late struggles, the Warriors still won by a comfortable margin as McGowan got six assists and Caves added five assists, part of a well-balanced attack where only Aaron Clouthier netted three goals.Caves, Devin Dewane, Jacob Fahey and Matt Jerman each had two goals, Dewane adding two assists. McGowan joined Piseno, Mancuso and Cade Clouthier in netting single goals. Ryan Eccles led Syracuse with four goals and two assists.On Friday night, C-NS met Fayetteville-Manlius, who by defeating the Northstars 19-5 clinched the SCAC Metro division regular-season title, the Hornets’ 7-1 league mark just ahead of Baldwinsville’s 6-2.Four unanswered goals in the second quarter put F-M further in control after it bolted out 6-2 in the opening period, with seven different Hornets earning multiple goals, led by Jack Shanley (four goals, one assist) and Mike Howe (three goals one assist).Pickard did find the net twice for C-NS, while Griffith, Cramer and Jason Meigs had one goal apiece. Cimino added two assists as Bartolo and O’Hara made 13 combined saves.With the loss, the Northstars fell to 5-9, still with games left early this week against Binghamton and Central Square as Liverpool (9-6) hosts West Genesee Tuesday, right before the Section III Class A playoff brackets would be revealed.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Even though they both will find themselves part of the Section III Class A playoffs, the boys lacrosse teams at Liverpool and Cicero-North Syracuse will go there as challengers, knowing something special is needed for a championship.For Liverpool, the path is not as steep, as it demonstrated again in last Tuesday’s game against visiting Fayetteville-Manlius, where tremendous defense was not quite enough to turn back the Hornets in a 6-5 defeat.Neither side would produce much for long stretches of the game. For a while, this played to the Warriors’ advantage, for it was able to inch out in front, 4-3, by halftime against an F-M side it lost to 13-10 in April.center_img Tags: boys lacrosseC-NSliverpoollast_img read more