World Championships: American Muhammad breaks own world record to win 400m hurdles

first_imgWorld Championships: American Muhammad breaks own world record to win 400m hurdlesWorld Athlectics Championships: American Muhammad, the 2016 Olympic champion, crossed the finish line 0.04 seconds faster than her previous world record set in Julyadvertisement Reuters DohaOctober 5, 2019UPDATED: October 5, 2019 08:24 IST Dalilah Muhammad celebrates after winning the women’s 400 meter hurdles final. (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSDalilah Muhammad broke her own world record to win the women’s 400 metres hurdles at WorldsMuhammad crossed the finish line 0.04 seconds faster than her previous world recordThe American attributed her two world marks to her work ethicAmerican Dalilah Muhammad broke her own world record to win the women’s 400 metres hurdles at the world championships with a time of 52.16 seconds on Friday, edging out compatriot Sydney McLaughlin in a gripping race.The 29-year-old Muhammad, the 2016 Olympic champion, crossed the finish line 0.04 seconds faster than her previous world record set in July.The American attributed her two world marks to her work ethic, and said she was focused on successfully defending her title at next year’s Tokyo Olympics.”It’s just how I work, she told reporters after the race. I go out there every day and just try to give it my all. It feels good to have it come when it matters.””Muhammad was only slightly ahead of silver medallist McLaughlin over the first 100m of the race, but her lead grew as they came through the second bend.When she crossed the finish line, Muhammad had no idea she had set a new record.”I didn’t even know who had won the race,” she said.McLaughlin, 20, closed in on her team mate on the home stretch but she could not quite catch up as she finished second in 52.23 seconds, a personal best.”She is amazing,” McLaughlin said of Muhammad. “She has been doing this for a long time. I constantly try to learn from her. We knew it would be fast, but we didn’t think it would be another world record.”The two Americans completely dominated the race, opening up a large gap on the rest of the field.advertisementRushell Clayton of Jamaica took the bronze with a personal best time of 53.74 seconds.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnita Jat Nextlast_img read more

Millennial Money Making good enough choices can pay off

Sometimes good enough is good enough.In a world of information overload, it’s common to feel angst when making choices. You never know whether you’re making the best one.Call it optimizer guilt. And it can be especially prominent in choosing financial products, which can be opaque and confusing: Do I have the best credit card? What 401(k) investment will give me the best return? Where should I open an account to save for my kid’s college expenses?Besides adding stress, optimizer guilt can keep you from making important money decisions that need action now.The solution may be the theory of “good enough,” or what academics have called “satisficing.” Make a decision based on the best information you can reasonably gather at the time, and then get on with your life. In many cases, you can revisit the decision later, if necessary — refinance your mortgage, move your retirement funds or choose a different 529 college savings plan.“The truly great thing about ‘good enough’ — and the reason it is so powerful — is that it allows you to get to the starting line in a way that waiting for the ultimate, best possible result does not,” writes financial expert Jean Chatzky in her book “Make Money, Not Excuses.”HOW SIMPLIFYING CAN HELPYou may have heard the same problem called “paralysis by analysis” and the solution as, “Don’t make perfect the enemy of the good,” or the acronym KISS: “Keep it simple, stupid.”“Good enough” is not just a financial well-being thing, it’s a happiness thing.Having more choices is good only up to a point because of the accompanying pressure to optimize, argues psychologist Barry Schwartz in his book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less.”“As the number of choices grows further, the negatives escalate until, ultimately, choice no longer liberates, but debilitates,” he wrote in a research paper with Andrew Ward, a fellow professor at Swarthmore College. “Learning to accept ‘good enough’ will simplify decision-making and increase satisfaction.”If you get an adrenaline rush from plotting your credit card points on spreadsheets and poring over price-to-earnings ratios of individual stocks, this concept may not be for you. You’re a die-hard optimizer who crunches numbers for sport.The theory of good enough is for those who feel overwhelmed, thinking they should optimize their money life but feeling shame because they don’t have the time or desire. If that’s you, consider decluttering your finances. Simplify by combining financial accounts, save with automatic deposits, and skip low-value retail loyalty programs and coupons.Here are a few specific examples of good enough.— RETIREMENT INVESTING. Too many choices in a company-sponsored retirement plan, like a 401(k), can lead to making no selection at all. If that sounds familiar, a good-enough decision would be to contribute enough to get all of your employer’s matching contribution and invest the money in a target-date index fund, a fund that invests based on what date you expect to retire. Is that optimal? Maybe not. But it gets you started. You can raise your contribution percentage and research other funds later. Meanwhile, your nest egg has started growing.— REWARDS CREDIT CARDS. If you pay your credit card balance in full every month, you’re a candidate for a rewards credit card, but how to choose among the thousands available? To get started, a good-enough choice is a flat-rate cash-back credit card that pays 1.5% or higher. It gives you a fixed amount of cash back no matter what you buy. You can always get a complicated points or miles card later. Until then, you’ll be earning rewards on everything you charge to the card in the best rewards currency: cash.— COLLEGE SAVINGS. You gain tax advantages by squirreling college savings in certain types of accounts, but it can be dizzying trying to choose among them all. A good-enough option is to invest in your own state’s 529 savings plan and potentially reap a state tax break, too, depending on the state. Choose a target-date fund, based on when your child is likely to attend college. Later, you might move the money to a different state’s plan or start a different account. The point is, you started saving.For big-money decisions or unusual circumstances, you might want to put more effort into making an ideal choice, or you might seek professional advice. But for many other decisions, settling for “good enough” can end up being optimal._____________________________________________________This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Gregory Karp is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: gkarp@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @spendingsmart.RELATED LINKS:NerdWallet: How to pick the best credit card for you: 4 easy steps http://bit.ly/nerdwallet-steps-picking-credit-cardsBarry Schwartz TED Talk on “The Paradox of Choice” https://www.ted.com/talks/barry_schwartz_on_the_paradox_of_choiceGregory Karp Of Nerdwallet, The Associated Press read more