Governor Douglas awards $750,000 grant for major renovation project in Springfield

first_imgGovernor Douglas today announced that the State of Vermont will be contributing $750,000 in grant funds to a major redevelopment project in Springfield. The grant, made available through the Vermont Community Development Program, will help repair sections of the former Fellows Gear Shaper/PVDC facility in downtown Springfield.   The property, largely vacant for several years, is being redeveloped by One Hundred River Street, LLC.“This award will not only help mitigate blighted areas of the former Fellows property, but also pave the way for new job creation, as well as restore an important part of Springfield’s historic downtown,” the Governor said. “This revitalization project is a perfect example of Vermont’s commitment to redeveloping its downtowns and villages as centers of social and commercial activity.”Officials from One Hundred River Street, LLC, anticipate having a significant portion of the site demolition work completed before winter. Once renovations are completed, officials anticipate that the building will be used for office, light industrial and retail space.“The Town of Springfield and the State of Vermont have been vital in assisting us throughout this project and these funds will help us address restoration issues on the site immediately,” said Rick Genderson, who along with John Meekin, is a principal of One Hundred River Street, LLC. Source: Governor’s office. 9.18.2009###last_img read more

No spitting, no fans: baseball restarts S. Korea’s sports season

first_imgTopics : Another online user said: “This doesn’t feel like the opening of a season at all. I’m watching baseball from home, hugging a pillow.”At the stadium, strict health checks and hygiene measures were enforced.Players must have their temperature checked twice before games, with face masks to be worn in all areas except the playing field and the dugouts, according to the KBO.Players have also been asked not to shake hands or exchange high-fives, while spitting is prohibited — putting a new complexion on what is South Korea’s most popular spectator sport. Instead, banners with photos of masked fans stretched across the empty bleachers at the Incheon-based SK Wyverns club’s Munhak Baseball Stadium.Banners carrying messages for victory were also put up at the LG Twins club’s Jamsil derby in Seoul, saying: “Even if we are apart, we are TWINS.”Fans were divided over the unprecedented format.”Baseball is finally back! But I wonder when I can actually go to the stadium,” tweeted one fan. US tunes in ESPN announced it will show six KBO League games per week to fans pining for live baseball in the US, while broadcasters in 10 foreign territories have snapped up rights to air K-League matches.South Korea endured one of the worst early outbreaks of the disease outside China, prompting professional sports to suspend or delay their seasons.But the country appears to have brought its outbreak under control thanks to an extensive “trace, test and treat” program.The start-up will bring welcome live action in a barren sports world where fans have had to make do with sports channels and broadcasters airing repeats of past events.The K-League, originally due to start in February, will kick off Friday with a blockbuster clash between Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors, champions for the past three seasons, against FA Cup winners Suwon Bluewings.And South Korea will next week become the first country to see women’s professional golf resume after COVID-19.South Korean players dominate women’s golf with eight featuring in the world’s top 20, including number one Ko Jin-young.The $1.8 million the Korea Ladies Professional Golf Association (KLPGA) Championship begins on May 14 in Yangju, east of Seoul with world number six Kim Sei-young and 10th-ranked Lee Jeong-eun in the 144-strong field.South Korea has been seeing only a trickle of new coronavirus infections in recent days, with three fresh cases reported on Tuesday taking the total to 10,804. South Korea’s professional sport returned to action after the coronavirus shutdown with the opening of a new baseball season Tuesday, while football and golf will soon follow suit in a ray of hope for suspended competitions worldwide.Friday will see the delayed start of football’s K-League, and next week some of golf’s leading women players will tee up in a domestic tournament as South Korea becomes a rare hotspot for live sport.Fans were not allowed in when any of Tuesday’s five opening Korean Baseball Organization (KBO) matches saw the first pitches thrown, a marked contrast from the packed stadiums of previous years when fans sang and cheered relentlessly no matter the score.last_img read more