QPR appoint Hoos

first_img Hoos, who has been CEO at Burnley since December 2011, will join the London club for next season’s Sky Bet Championship campaign. The 53-year-old American joins head coach Chris Ramsey, who signed a permanent three-year deal at Loftus Road on Tuesday. QPR have appointed Lee Hoos as their new chief executive. Press Associationlast_img read more

Women’s basketball: UW picks up second Big Ten win despite sloppy offensive play

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin women’s basketball team scratched and clawed their way to a low-scoring victory 53-41 over Rutgers University Saturday. The Badgers won, but the game was far from an offensive clinic.Both squads shot poorly throughout the game and struggled to find an offensive rhythm. The shooting percentages were not pretty on either side, with UW going 36.1 percent from the floor and Rutgers shooting 27.1 percent.Emily Hamer/The Badger HeraldWomen’s basketball: Badgers desperate for a win with Rutgers in the crosshairsThe University of Wisconsin women’s basketball team (6-20, 1-12 Big Ten) will square off against Rutgers University (6-20, 3-10) in Read…UW won the 3-point shooting battle, edging the Scarlet Knights from the arc by 7.5 percent. This deep ball was one of the keys that propelled the Badgers to victory.The Badgers doubled Rutgers’ 3-point total, connecting on six shots compared to three for Rutgers. The Badgers found their real offensive advantage, however, at the free throw line. UW went 21 for 27 from the charity stripe while Rutgers finished 12 for 16 from the line.That three-basket advantage from beyond the 3-point line and 9 more points generated by free throws made up for a sloppy night with plenty of turnovers.The Badgers and the Scarlet Knights both struggled to contain their turnovers as they each logged more than 20 by the final whistle. Free throws and 3-pointers allowed UW the victory.Emily Hamer/The Badger HeraldThe Badgers’ effort on defense, however, shouldn’t be overlooked.UW held Rutgers’ leading scorer, Shrita Parker, to 16 points on 5 for 16 shooting. The Badgers knew coming in that Parker was the engine for the Scarlet Knights’ offense, and if they could contain her they could also stymie their opponent’s entire offensive attack.Only one other Rutgers player had more than 11 points, as the Badgers did a good job creating turnovers and disrupting offensive flow.Avayana Young’s and Cayla McMorris’ strong performances led the UW offense. Young led the Badgers in scoring with 14 points while also contributing six rebounds. McMorris, the only other Badger in double digits, scored 10 points.Emily Hamer/The Badger HeraldMen’s basketball: Wisconsin trumps Maryland 71-60 in Big Ten battleA second-half offensive explosion and stingy defense led the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team to a 71-60 win over Read…Bench production was another offensive key for the Badgers as four bench players combined for 16 points. The Rutgers bench only had 5 points.Despite losing both the turnover and rebounding battles, UW still had enough of an offense push to finish on top. They did not let turnovers beat them the way they have in other games this season.Following the win against Rutgers, UW only has two Big Ten games left. The first comes Wednesday at home against Illinois, and the second will be played Sunday against Iowa on the road. Wednesday’s game against Illinois tips at the Kohl Center at 7 p.m.last_img read more

Judge issues tentative ruling dismissing suit against KABC radio, host

first_imgMcIntyre exploited a combination of anti-immigration sentiment and the nation’s fear of Islamic terrorists to “create a racist fury against Latino school children, teachers, administrators and staff at the school,” according to the lawsuit. Among other remarks to his listeners, McIntyre said “Is this a reconquista school?”; “This school is ranked the lowest of the low in the LAUSD and in the state of California”; and “Aztecs butchered and ate Spanish invaders. I wonder if they’re teaching that at ASDP,” according to the lawsuit. McIntyre said Aguilar’s job was to “keep his school, his madrasa school, open so they can train the next generation of Aztec revolutionaries,” according to the lawsuit. The radio host also used “code words” aimed at a target audience to rile up listeners and create a backlash against the school and Aguilar, the plaintiffs allege. As a result, they say, the school received many threats of violence, including a bomb threat that caused an evacuation of the campus. In a declaration submitted to the court on Oct. 15, McIntyre said he found the bomb threat against the school deplorable and offered $1,000 of his own money as a reward for bringing the perpetrator to justice. “That offer remains standing today,” McIntyre’s declaration states. McIntyre also denied his use of the word “madrasa” was meant to insinuate that the school was teaching students jihadist philosophy or instructing them how they could become revolutionaries. Although Aguilar appeared on other KABC radio shows, he refused to be interviewed by McIntyre, according to the broadcaster. Meanwhile, a man who aimed his car at KABC radio reporter Sandy Wells and snatched the newsman’s audiotape as he tried to interview parents and others outside the school on June 1, 2006, was sentenced in May to three years probation. Ramon Flores also was ordered to pay $174 to Wells — who jumped out of the way of the speeding sedan and escaped injury — and complete 400 hours of service on a Caltrans crew. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A judge today tentatively dismissed a lawsuit brought by a Los Angeles charter campus against KABC-AM and its morning host, alleging he led an on-air, racist campaign against the school that led to a bomb scare. Academia Semillas Del Pueblo and its principal director of operations, Marcos Aguilar, filed the lawsuit May 17 in Los Angeles Superior Court, alleging slander and civil rights violations. Superior Court Judge Ralph W. Dau stated in a written ruling that the remarks made by “McIntyre in the Morning” host Doug McIntyre were opinion and not a “command to imminent violence or other lawless action.” After hearing arguments this morning from the attorneys concerning his ruling, Dau said he was taking the case under submission. He did not give a date for a final ruling. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Aguilar attended the hearing, but McIntyre, whose program airs from 5-9 a.m. daily, was not present. Outside the courtroom, Daniel J. Bramzon, a lawyer for Aguilar and the school, contended that regardless of the final decision, Aguilar has made “a David and Goliath stand against hate speech.” James J. Moneer, another attorney for Aguilar and the school, argued the statute being used by the radio station and McIntyre to try and get the suit thrown out was never intended to protect the statements made by the veteran broadcaster. However, Seth D. Berlin, a lawyer for the station and McIntyre, said McIntyre’s show is not a hard-news broadcast, but one in which he freely gives his opinions on social issues of the day. Often those views are expressed through satire and rhetorical flourish, he told the judge. The lawsuit alleges McIntyre began criticizing various aspects of the school in May 2006, including its funding, curriculum, demographics, administrators and educational statistics, all in order to increase his show’s ratings. last_img read more

Proposal To Force Insurers Hospitals To Disclose Secretly Negotiated Prices Stirs Such

first_img Modern Healthcare: UHS Partners With Primary-Care Firm To Serve Plan Enrollees Proposal To Force Insurers, Hospitals To Disclose Secretly Negotiated Prices Stirs Such Vocal Opposition It May Get Dropped President Donald Trump is working on an executive order intended to increase price transparency across the health care landscape. But one of the aspects to the order is provoking intense backlash. Compelling disclosure of negotiated rates “would have the ultimate anti-competitive effect,” said Tom Nickels, the American Hospital Association’s executive vice president for government relations and public policy. The Associated Press: Insider Q&A: Doctor On Demand CEO Leads Primary Care Push In other news from the health industry — Hill Ferguson thinks telemedicine can become a routine option for patients, not just an easy way to handle middle of the night ear infections. The CEO of Doctor on Demand says primary care is a new frontier for companies like his that offer telemedicine, which involves seeing a doctor or nurse from afar, often through a secure video connection. His company is teaming with the insurer Humana to launch a new plan in Texas and Florida next month that connects some patients with employer-sponsored coverage virtually to a regular doctor licensed in their state. (5/29) President Trump is preparing to issue an executive order to foster greater price transparency across a broad swath of the health-care industry as consumer concerns about medical costs emerge as a major issue in the lead-up to next year’s presidential election. The most far-reaching element favored by the White House aides developing the order would require insurers and hospitals to disclose for the first time the discounted rates they negotiate for services, according to health-care lobbyists and policy experts familiar with the deliberations. (Goldstein and Dawsey, 5/29) Universal Health Services has become the latest health system to partner with a primary-care specialty company to provide intensive primary-care services to its health plan enrollees. The company announced Wednesday that it signed one of its first value-based payment deals with Seattle-based Vera Whole Health to operate two new primary-care centers in Reno and Carson City, Nevada, serving members of UHS’ 100,000-member Prominence Health Plan. (Meyer, 5/29) The Washington Post: White House Runs Into Health-Care Industry Hostility As It Plans Executive Order This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more