Postal Service Files for Special Rate Increase in January

first_imgMeanwhile, a joint filing by four industry mail groups including Magazine Publishers of America says no way. “The court left in place the Commission’s findings that the Postal Service had submitted no evidence indicating that its request was causally related to the recession, and that the Postal Service’s financial problems were caused in large part by longstanding structural issues, not the recession.” When it comes to the “Three P’s”–printer, postage and paper–postage costs have exploded in recent years, Cygnus Business Media vice president of operations Tom Martin told FOLIO:. “In 2000, printing was 45 percent to 55 percent of costs, paper was probably 20 to 25 percent of costs, and postage was between 30 to 32 percent. If you look at today’s costs, the printer has probably lost 15 to 20 points because the printer is probably sitting with only 32 percent of overall costs. Paper hasn’t changed that much but the number that has changed tremendously is postage. That’s probably sitting at 46 percent of overall costs depending on the magazine.” Thought the postal battle had achieved temporary détente? Think again.The U.S. Postal Service this week asked the Postal Regulatory Commission to let it implement an exigent rate increase averaging more than 4 percent across most classes of mail in order to make up for volume lost during the recession, reports anonymous blogger Dead Tree Edition. Last year, the PRC denied a similar request to boots rates by as much as 8 percent, saying that USPS cashflow problems were not the result of the recession. However, a federal court has ordered the PRC to review that ruling. “The Postal Service suffered financial harm directly associated with extraordinary and exceptional volume losses that the [inflation-based] price cap mechanism is incapable of addressing,” the USPS brief says. “The Postal Service respectfully requests that the Commission recognize $2.34 billion as a plausible lower-bound estimate of the Postal Service’s financial harm ‘due to’ recession-related volume losses in FY 2008 and FY2009, and approve exigent rate increases (for January 2012 implementation) on that basis.”last_img read more

See Neil Armstrongs Apollo 11 spacesuit all fixed up

first_imgNeil Armstrong wore this spacesuit on the Apollo 11 mission to the moon in 1969. National Air and Space Museum NASA isn’t the only space agency trying to land on the… NASA’s epic Apollo 11 mission to land humans on the moon launched on July 16, 1969. In preparation for the 50th anniversary celebrations, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, went to work to conserve and preserve Neil Armstrong’s iconic Apollo 11 spacesuit. And it looks great.The museum unveiled the post-conservation spacesuit on Twitter on Wednesday. It will go back on display on July 16 for the first time in 13 years. Sci-Tech 23 Photos Forgotten Apollo moon artifacts found in Neil Armstrong’s closet Elon Musk gets behind goofy Neil Armstrong alien meme Our conservation of Neil Armstrong’s #Apollo11 spacesuit is complete, and we are excited to finally release brand new photography of the suit. It will go back on display for the first time in over a decade on July 16, the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11. #Apollo50 pic.twitter.com/2uRQzWbmbX— National Air and Space Museum (@airandspace) May 1, 2019 NASA’s wildest rides: Extreme vehicles for Earth and beyond Share your voice 6:56 Post a commentcenter_img The journey to protect the moon-worn spacesuit dates back years. The Smithsonian launched a Kickstarter project in 2015 to raise the funds necessary for the work. Click here for To The Moon, a CNET multipart series examining our relationship with the moon from the first landing of Apollo 11 to future human settlement on its surface. Robert Rodriguez/CNET The campaign pulled in over $700,000 (£530,000, AU$990,000) to pay for stabilizing the fragile suit, which required delicate fabric repair, stain removal, cleaning and preservation of fading materials and degraded plastic parts. The crowdfunding money also helped pay for a mannequin to wear the suit and a state-of-the-art climate-controlled display case. The suit will go on temporary display near the 1903 Wright Flyer before being moved to a permanent home in 2022 for a exhibition called Destination Moon.Armstrong’s suit kept him safe when he stepped foot on the moon. All these decades later, the Smithsonian was able to repay the favor and protect the spacesuit for posterity back here on Earth. Now playing: Watch this: To the Moon 0 NASA Space This story is part of To the Moon, a series exploring humanity’s first journey to the lunar surface and our future living and working on the moon. Tags Neil Armstrong happeningslast_img read more

Nepal minister among 7 dead in chopper crash

first_imgNepal’s tourism minister Rabindra Adhikari was among seven people killed Wednesday when a helicopter crashed in the country’s hilly east, officials said.Rescue workers retrieved the bodies of Adhikari, 49, the pilot and five other passengers from a hillside in Taplejung district where the Air Dynasty chopper went down.”The respected minister’s body has been identified,” Ram Krishna Subedi, the spokesman for the ministry of home affairs, said in a press conference.Subedi said two army helicopters had been dispatched to bring the bodies back to the capital Kathmandu.It is unclear why the helicopter crashed.A search and rescue team was deployed to the area after locals alerted authorities to flames and smoke rising from a hillside.”The helicopter is in pieces, and scattered all over,” said Suraj Bhattarai, a witness who saw the debris.The bodies of the others killed in the crash have not yet been identified.The minister was on a trip to scope out a possible location for a new airport in the region.It is just the latest aviation accident to plague Nepal, an impoverished Himalayan nation with a poor air safety record.Nepal has some of the world’s most remote and tricky runways, flanked by snow-capped peaks with approaches that pose a challenge for even accomplished pilots.The country has a booming private helicopter industry, flying tourists and goods to remote corners of the Himalayan nation where road access is limited or non-existent.In September last year, six people including a Japanese tourist was killed when a helicopter crashed.A US-Bangla Airways plane crashed near the capital’s airport in March, killing 51 people.Nepal-based airlines are banned from flying in European Union airspace.Its poor air safety record is largely blamed on inadequate maintenance and sub-standard management.last_img read more