Were You Productive Today?

first_imgDid you make progress on your most important project? Productivity isn’t how many things you scratch off your to-do list. You can have days where you complete all kinds of tasks, none of which have anything to do with what was really important. Productivity is doing what’s important.Did you move closer to your most important goal? If what you did today did not move you closer to your goals, you may not have been as productive as you might have been. Goals are achieved by taking disciplined action day after day, not all at once. If what you’re doing isn’t aligned with your long-term goals, you may have gotten things done without being productive.Did you do the three most important tasks that needed to be done today? I like the idea of having three major tasks to get done. It seems like the right number of major tasks. Maybe three 90-minute blocks of time invested in the above projects and goals? You might be able to do more, but if you have a list of twelve major tasks to do, you are kidding yourself.Did you make a difference? Did the things you do today make a difference? Did they make a difference in your business? Did they make a difference in your personal life? Did they make a difference in someone else’s life, maybe someone who needed your help? The most important work you do makes a difference. A lot of things we do fail this test, even if it makes you feel busy.Did you invest the appropriate time and energy in one or two of your most important relationships? There isn’t anything more important in your life than the people you care about and the people who care about you. You might be so busy doing “what” you are doing that you forget “why” you are doing it and for “whom” are you doing it?Did you learn something today that will help you improve your future results? Productivity isn’t only about doing what needs to be done now. Being productive also requires that you sharpen your saw. You are the saw. You’ll become dull if you don’t take the time to do things to keep sharp.Did you take care of your physical health? This one should have probably been first on the list. You need physical energy to be productive. You also need mental energy and stamina. You won’t have these things if you don’t eat well, drink water, exercise, and sleep (likely more than you are now, and likely more than you want to). You can’t be productive if you are wiped out.last_img read more

▶︎ The Phone and Cold Outreach Still Dominate – Episode #118

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 8:42 — 7.0MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSRegardless of what the pseudo-experts say, the telephone still dominates when it comes to generating appointments, the key to creating new opportunities. The social tools are useful, and they play an increasingly important role, but they are no replacement for outbound and cold outreach.last_img read more

Record rainfall in Mount Abu

first_imgThe desert state of Rajasthan may want to permanently ban the cliché, ‘like the deserts miss the rain,’ as heavy downpour for the third consecutive day led to flood-like situations in Sirohi, Jalore and Pali districts.The State’s lone hill station, Mount Abu in Sirohi district, received an unprecedented 770 mm of rain in 24 hours. Statistics show that until 2010, the 100-year record for a single-day of rain in Mt Abu was 653 mm in 1992. The only comparable deluge after was a 453 mm downpour in 2015. According to A.K. Srivastava of the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), Pune, this was “possibly” the maximum rain ever received in the region.In comparison, the torrential rain that brought Mumbai to a standstill in 2005 was 944 mm and 644 mm on July 26 and 27, whereas Chennai was brought to its knees in 2015 with a cumulative November tally of 1,049 mm.A rise in extreme rainfall events, according to experts, is the consequence of a spike in temperatures across India in recent decades, and its effect on the monsoon. “Mt. Abu being hilly may not see a situation like Mumbai. But it is now well established that these rain records are a fall-out of global warming,” Mr. Srivastava said. Mount Abu is at an elevation of 4,000 ft above sea level.As incessant rains created chaos in the hill station, a large number of people were marooned, and the 28 km-long road that connects it to the Abu Road railway station was partially damaged.Tanveer Hussain, a medical officer at the government hospital in Mount Abu, told The Hindu that life was thrown out of gear as it had been raining incessantly for the past two days. “There were two incidents of landslide, but thankfully, the route to Abu Road is still somewhat functional despite partial damage,” he said. “All the markets, offices and schools in the town were closed.”(With inputs from Jacob Koshy)last_img read more

Heritage Meets Modernity: The club culture of Kolkata

first_imgIf you thought that Kolkata was only about heritage with a dash of a colonial hangover, think again. Kolkatans may still like to indulge in one of the most British cultures of the city, but come a new era, the face of club culture is fast changing.  A residual feature of colonial British culture that still remains embedded in the very DNA of the city is that of the club culture. These clubs originally began as places of British refuge and entertainment for the officials who visited the city. Today, they stand as testimonies of the cultural past of the city. However, they are not just merely residues of the past. Most of these elite clubs are highly functional and as elite even today. This makes them interesting spaces where the past meets the present.  According to fashion designer Agnimitra Paul, a frequent face at the city clubs, the club culture of Kolkata is a unique feature of the city’s culture. “The people of no other city are as involved in the culture of the clubs as they are here in Kolkata,” said she.Clubs like the Tollygunge Club, the Bengal Club, the Calcutta Club, Dalhousie Institute are some such elite clubs that were set up in the British era. Even today, they remain as elite in terms of membership, with waiting lists that seem to stretch on forever. Although their events remain largely traditional and annual such as their famous Christmas lunches and so on, these clubs have adapted themselves to suit the changing times. While these events still remain annual and quite traditional, the ways in which they are celebrated now differ greatly from their colonial counterpart. With the use of DJs and events like fashion shows, annual club events have moved forward in sync with the changing times.advertisementArun Mukherji, president of the Tollygunj Club, affectionately called the “Tolly” Club, firmly believes that change is the key to the success of a club. “Tolly is a sports-centric club therefore modernisation of the sports facilities is an important factor to us. We must change with the times. In the 60s, there were dances that used to be organised here. Today, we have similar events, but they have been modernised,” said he.If a club is an area for interaction between people, it is imperative to study the changing demographics in order to understand the changing face of these clubs. These heritage clubs have been part of the city for years, thus membership has often run as a heirloom through elite Kolkata families. However, this is changing today. The members of yesteryears were what Mukherji calls “manor-born”. It is not entirely so today. Today, self-made individuals who may not come from traditionally affluent families are seeking membership at these clubs, thus diversifying the population.While these clubs themselves have been changing to keep up with the times, the city has also seen the rise of new-age commercial clubs. If the traditionally Brit clubs still have never ending waiting lists for memberships, these new clubs have happily opened their doors to the 21st century metropolitan citizen seeking the luxuries of a club life.Although these new age clubs promise to bring the luxury of the club life, they are markedly different from the traditional clubs. Spring Club, located on E.M. Bypass is one such haunt.However, Sanjeev Ghosh, General Manager at the Spring Club said, “These new clubs have come up due to the change in lifestyles of the people of this city. The old clubs are more traditional in their approach whereas new ones such as ours are free spaces for people to relax. Our events are very different from that of those clubs. They have annual, restricted events where you can bring up to three guests at a time. Over here, we have weekly parties, where you can entertain whoever you like.”This unique culture of Kolkata has its own set of takers of course. Sanjay Budhia, Managing Director of Patton Group, Eastern Region, is one such patron. “The traditional clubs like the Tolly Club and the Bengal Club are clubs which are very old and complete in their facilities. However, as they are traditional places, they are restricted to their particular zones in the city. I feel that the club culture is a rather relaxing culture that everyone should indulge in. It rejuvenates you and allows you to work better after. It is a place where I can blend work and leisure. I like to relax here with my family on weekends. But I also like to bring my international clients here to give them a taste of our unique club culture. They are never disappointed,” said he.advertisementWhile new clubs are springing up all over the city, patrons seem divided in their opinions about the two different lifestyles. There still exists a group of loyalists who still swear by their traditional clubs. However, some seem to be more open to the idea of having new clubs in town. Budhia seems to be one who is open to these new clubs. On this front he says, “The old clubs are quite excellent, but the problem with them is that they are constricted to certain parts of the city. I like the fact that there are new clubs in town. Now everyone can enjoy the club facilities throughout the city.”These new clubs are a step away from the traditional British culture of the traditional ones. While clubs like Tolly and CC&FC revel in Western festivities like Christmas and New Years’ Eve, the new clubs like Stadel and Spring Club are turning to Indian festivals. If Indian festivals are about the community coming together, and clubs are spaces of social communion, what better place to celebrate grand Indian festivals?”The Spring Club is a place with a family environment. There are family oriented events based on Indian festivals now like Bhai Dooj, Diwali, Baisakhi and so on, which is conductive for conserving our rich Indian heritage,” says industrialist Kamal Gandhi.Agnimitra Paul feels that the traditional clubs have their own place. Talking about the place of new clubs in the city, she said, “There clubs may not be as reputed or have the heritage of the older ones, but they do have top class facilities. Getting membership here is much easier and they also have events more frequently. If they keep up the quality, soon they will be at par with the old clubs.”With a blend of the old and a dash of new, the club culture in Kolkata is growing to become a rather interesting affair indeed.last_img read more