Major bureaucratic reshuffle in Rajasthan, 81 officers shifted

first_imgIn a major bureaucratic reshuffle, the Rajasthan government has transferred 81 Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officers after the appointment of D.B. Gupta as the new Chief Secretary. The Collectors of 15 districts and three Divisional Commissioners were among those shifted in the orders issued late on Monday night.Mr. Gupta, a 1983-batch IAS officer, was appointed the Chief Secretary after the retirement of N.C. Goel, who had the shortest tenure of four months. Speculations were rife about Mr. Goel’s extension, but the Centre reportedly did not accept a proposal sent by the State government in this regard.Mr. Goel played a key role in the execution of the Vasundhara Raje government’s ambitious projects, including the inauguration of oil refinery in Barmer, during his tenure. Mr. Gupta, 58, was earlier Additional Chief Secretary (Finance, Excise and Taxation). The charge of these departments has been given to Mukesh Kumar Sharma.‘Political overtones’The reshuffle, which may have been the last before the State goes to Assembly polls in December this year, seemingly had political overtones with the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party keen on sending across a message of good governance to the electorate.Seven officers of the rank of Additional Chief Secretary were given new responsibilities in the reshuffle, while T. Ravikanth was posted as Divisional Commissioner in Jaipur, Lalit Kumar Gupta in Jodhpur and Kailash Chand Verma in Kota.Neeraj K. Pawan, who was reinstated in November last year after his arrest and suspension in connection with a graft case, was posted as Special Secretary, Administrative Reforms Department. The 2003-batch IAS officer spent eight months in jail on charges of corruption in the award of contracts in the National Rural Health Mission.The Collectors of Bikaner, Pratapgarh, Kota, Ajmer, Dholpur, Rajsamand, Bhilwara, Tonk, Sawai Madhopur, Bundi, Hanumangarh, Churu, Alwar, Jaisalmer and Bharatpur were transferred in the reshuffle.last_img read more

ACTRA says its expediting sexual harassment complaints processes

first_imgActor and filmmaker Nicole Stamp moderated the discussion “Confronting Sexual Harassment in the Industry” at the TIFF Bell Lightbox in Toronto on Friday, December 1, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov At a panel discussion on sexual harassment hosted Friday by the organization behind the Toronto International Film Festival, ACTRA Toronto president Theresa Tova outlined a number of immediate steps the union is taking as it also works with other industry stakeholders on longer-term strategies. TORONTO — The union for Canada’s TV and film performers says it’s expediting its discipline processes for sexual harassment and assault complaints. Advertisement “In film time, if you get assaulted on Monday, you’re back on set on Tuesday and it might be a really intense day where you can’t call in sick,” said Stamp. Stamp said she felt “it was a really productive discussion” in which the panellists were speaking candidly and “were comfortable being a little bit vulnerable in explaining some of the process.” “We will announce it to the world. I’ve said to a few producers, ‘Are you afraid that you will lose business?’ and they go, ‘Absolutely not. We need to do this.’ I think we’ll gain business because people know when they come to Canada, you’re protected.”Victoria Ahearn – The Canadian Press Advertisement Having a hotline that results in immediate action is crucial given that victims of sexual harassment and assault have often had to work with their abusers while a complaint was investigated, noted actor/filmmaker Nicole Stamp, who moderated the panel chat. Many on the panel said the industry is at a “watershed moment” in which organizations are working together to change the entire culture. That includes having zero tolerance, ending complicity, achieving parity, diversifying the power structure, and creating a future in which abuse is less likely to happen. “What I find really heartening about this discussion is the extent to which we’re all on the same page and we’re all adopting the same near-term, tangible tools and practices that can lead to real change on the issue,” said Marguerite Pigott, vice-president of outreach and strategic initiatives at the CMPA. Twitter “It goes directly to a counsellor, a company that does this for us, and/or it goes straight to our executive director or our staff, and people are there with you, immediately,” Tova said in an interview. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Friday’s talk also included representatives from the Directors Guild of Canada and the Canadian Media Producers Association, who met with ACTRA and other industry stakeholders last week about how to work together to end sexual harassment. Audience members included filmmakers Sarah Polley and Jennifer Baichwal. Also on the panel were filmmakers Patricia Rozema and Melanie Chung, Alix Herber of the Labour and Employment Law Group, and producer Martin Katz of Prospero Pictures. Tova said ACTRA has also hired a lawyer — a human rights specialist who has worked in the industry — to be their in-house adviser and guide complainants on what their choices are, how they can proceed and what they can do. “Many, many, many are calling us now about situations they’ve never reported before, ever,” she said, adding they have “some cases that are now going forward.” “Canada will be the leader in anti-harassment,” added Tova. Among the immediate steps is a plan to “investigate and get things happening” on serious allegations of sexual misconduct within 48 hours, she said. “That’s a big part of it — protecting our members going forward,” said Tova. “You just have to call us. We’re committed 100 per cent. We are there for you.” Advertisement “It’s more difficult than in many workplaces where you might be able to get a little bit of time away from the person that abused you. On a film set, you might be right back in with them the next day.” Login/Register With: Facebook ACTRA has also rebranded its after-hours, anonymous emergency reporting system as the Sexual Harassment and Emergency Hotline and is “plastering it everywhere,” encouraging members to call if they have had an experience they’d like to share.last_img read more