School board approves Ryan Bisio, Graham Johnson as Arcata basketball coaches

first_imgMcKinleyville >> The Northern Humboldt Union School Board voted unanimously to approve Ryan Bisio and Graham Johnson as varsity and junior varsity head coaches, respectively, in a special meeting at McKinleyville High School Monday evening.“In the end, tonight was a celebration of Arcata High basketball,” a relieved Bisio said after a tumultuous week. “There’s a lot of happy people out here tonight and I’m just one of them.”After a lengthy public comment session that saw numerous persons …last_img read more

Cave Climate Conclusions Compromised

first_imgWidely used to infer past climates, isotope measurements from stalactites and stalagmites in caves can mislead researchers.They are among the most useful storytellers of earth history: speleothems, or cave formations. Scientists collect samples from stalactites and stalagmites, take them to their labs, and measure the fractions of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes found in their inclusions of crystals of calcium carbonate or calcite. From these crystal balls, the scientists look far into the past, envisioning climate change and long ages. What could be more straightforward? The data prove it.A funny thing happens on the way to the lab. The isotopic fractionations become altered. Here’s what a team of speleologists (cave scientists) conclude from expeditions into a couple of caves in Hungary.Speleothem deposits are among the most valuable continental formations in paleoclimate research, as they can be dated using absolute dating methods, and they also provide valuable climate proxies. However, alteration processes such as post-depositional mineralogical transformations can significantly influence the paleoclimatic application of their geochemical data.Climate scientists know about some of the alteration processes, but this team points out new ones that have not been appreciated. The paper in Nature‘s open-access journal Scientific Reports concentrates on one alteration process—the transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) to nanocrystalline calcite—but suggests there are other factors that, if not properly accounted for, can have “serious consequences” on the interpretation given the data.Here’s the basic problem with ACC: it depletes the fraction of stable oxygen-18 ions (δ18O) before transforming into crystalline calcite. This happens within a few hours or days, potentially giving wrong readings in the lab when the speleothems are measured. The scientists, therefore, might be measuring different values in their refrigerator samples than the crystal as it was forming in the cave long ago. If they expect their measurements to represent a “proxy” (a measurement standing in for something else, like climate), they could be fooling themselves.Detection of ACC is rather difficult in cave deposits, as ACC can undergo transformation to calcite in minutes in a hydrous environment, and even stabilizing compounds like Mg or organic matter are only capable of extending its stability to some weeks. Taking into consideration the general precipitation rate (0.1 to 1 mm per year), the collection of carbonate in appropriate amounts for mineralogical or geochemical analyses requires several months. Over the course of such a long collection time, however, the original ACC can be transformed into calcite. Although ACC preparation in the laboratory is a routine procedure, its synthesis requires conditions distinctly different from those to be found in natural cave environments, e.g. mixing of CaCl2 and NaCO3 or (NH4)2CO3 solutions. Hence, the preparation conditions and characteristics of synthetic ACC render it inappropriate to function as an analogue of its natural counterpart, thus it cannot provide the information sought.The scientists observed ACC forming onsite in the cave on special collection surfaces. The ACC can exist in open or closed systems, depending on whether the inclusions become embedded within the dripwater, reaching equilibrium. The researchers in the lab will not always be able to tell whether calcite from which they obtain δ18O measurements reflect actual conditions in the cave or altered conditions when the ACC lowered the value during crystallization. The conclusions on which they base dates or paleoclimates could be in error.If this were the only worry, perhaps scientists could learn to correct for it by identifying other proxies for the presence of ACC. Unfortunately, this is not the only concern. ACC formation is a function of temperature, conductivity, pH, CO2 concentration, degassing rate, evaporation rate, drip rate and other factors. Unless these factors are known and controlled, and unless researchers gather their data in actual cave environments, they could be misled.The team also notes that scientists get different equations whether they use theoretical analyses, experimental techniques or empirical observations.Uncertainties in the estimation of ACC amount is a major weakness in the fractionation calculation, hence the verification of calcite-ACC fractionation estimation requires independent information provided either by experimental studies or by natural analogues. The experimental determination of ACC-water oxygen isotope fractionation representative for speleothem formation is challenging because (i) ACC rapidly transforms to calcite during the preparation and (ii) laboratory ACC synthesis requires physical and chemical conditions distinctly different from those found in a cave environment. Available estimations of δ18O differences between crystalline and amorphous carbonates formed in natural environments suggest that the crystalline carbonate is several ‰ more enriched in 18O than its amorphous counterpart (dolomite, aragonite, Mg-calcite).What you actually get may not be what you believe you got. Different caves and different forms of calcium carbonate may give very different results. The paper sounds a warning call to researchers:The present study provides direct evidence for relatively 18O-depleted ACC formation in caves at about 10 °C. Since the δ18O value of inclusion-hosted water may carry significant paleoclimatic/paleohydrological information, it is important to note that its use is limited by the cave environment.The authors add one more source of uncertainty: microbes. They toss out that potentially significant alteration right at the end of the paper, after summarizing reasons why you can’t trust the values in this “most valuable” method of inferring paleoclimates and dates. Oh, and don’t forget the unidentified organic compounds in the dripwater, which can vary significantly from cave to cave and also affect ACC formation.A number of experimental studies have shown that the formation and stability of ACC may be influenced by the physical parameters of the ambient environment and the chemical compositions of the parent solutions. In natural cave environments the most important factors might be the cave temperature, drip water pH, as well as concentrations of Mg, SO42− and organic compounds in the solution. A comprehensive study is suggested to cover several cave environments with different temperatures, ventilation degree, soil characteristics, drip water chemistry and carbonate growth rates in order to determine the exact factors governing ACC formation. The transition from ACC to calcite has been shown to take place in several steps with intermediate hydration states and mineral phases like vaterite. Investigations on the ACC-calcite transition and its governing factors require monitoring of mineralogical changes at high temporal resolution. Additionally to the inorganic factors, the role of microbial activity should also be investigated. Amorphous carbonates are ubiquitously secreted by living organisms in sedimentary environments, hence microbial mediated carbonate precipitation is also a potentially important process in ACC formation, whose exploration requires systematic biological/biochemical investigations.It appears that climatologists leaning on cave data know a lot less than they thought they knew. This final paragraph almost makes it seem like it’s time to toss out the equations and interpretations and start over. Isn’t that implied by “a comprehensive study is suggested” using “systematic biological/biochemical investigations” in multiple caves with varying conditions?Reference: “Formation of amorphous calcium carbonate in caves and its implications for speleothem research” by Attila Demény, Péter Németh, et al., Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 39602 (2016), doi:10.1038/srep39602, published 22 Dec 2016.Remember this paper the next time you are presented with scientific “facts” that prove a scientific “consensus” of one sort or another. The conclusions of any empirical study cannot be divorced from the assumptions that go into those conclusions. A consensus is most dangerous when the conclusion is decided in advance, and scientists within a preferred paradigm go out looking for evidence to confirm it. (Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Creative Inspiration: The History of the Title Sequence

first_imgClassic motion graphic design is displayed in The History of the Title Sequence.In a world of After Effects and Cinema 4D it’s easy to forget how much effort and creativity it took to create motion graphics in a non-digital environment. In his graduate project, motion graphics artist Jurjen Versteeg takes us on a fictitious journey through The History of the Title Sequence and creatively encapsulates the essence of some of the most popular motion graphic designers of the 20th century. The video was created in 2011, but we missed it upon it’s release and thought it too good not share.It should be noted that the entire film was shot over the course of 1 day. Jarjen used a small camera crane to shoot over his shoulder so his hands could be in the shot. The film is a great example of what can be achieved if you have a great idea and put in the necessary pre-production. The following video shows a behind the scenes look at the making of the short film.What do you think of The History of the Title Sequence? Is there anything you would have done differently? Comment below.last_img read more

Behind Moustakas HR, Royals Beat O’s, 6-4

first_imgBALTIMORE — Alcides Escobar doubled in the go-ahead run in the ninth inning, Mike Moustakas extended his home run-binge and Kansas City remained perfect in the playoffs, beating the Baltimore Orioles 6-4 Saturday for a 2-0 lead in the AL Championship Series.Now, the Royals head back to Kansas City with the knowledge that no team has ever lost a best-of-seven LCS after winning the first two games on the road.“We don’t want to be the first team to do that,” designated hitter Billy Butler said. “That’s all I get from that.”Lorenzo Cain had four hits, scored twice and drove in a run for the wild-card Royals, who are 6-0 in the playoffs this year, including 4-0 on the road. The Orioles hadn’t lost two in a row in Baltimore since June 28-29, but Kansas City found a way to quiet the towel-waving, screaming crowds.“The atmosphere here is great. It didn’t affect us,” Butler said. “Now we’ll go home and see if they can play in our atmosphere.”Moustakas homered for the fourth time in five games as the Royals won their ninth straight in the postseason, a string dating to the 1985 World Series.“To come in here and win two games against a great team like that, it’s huge for us,” Moustakas said. “A lot of confidence going back home.”Game 3 is Monday at Kauffman Stadium. Former Oriole Jeremy Guthrie will start for the Royals against either Wei-Yin Chen or Miguel Gonzalez.Manager Buck Showalter’s team has lost two in a row at Camden Yards for the first time since June 28-29, and now the Orioles must buck history to earn its first pennant since 1983. No club has ever won a best-of-seven LCS after dropping the first two games at home.“If one team can do it, it’s us,” slugger Nelson Cruz said.“The series ain’t over,” insisted Adam Jones, who hit his first playoff home run. “If you guys (are) thinking it’s over, why are we going to show up on Monday?”After squeezing out an 8-6 win in 10 innings on Friday night, the Royals again took apart the Baltimore bullpen with a late uprising.With the score tied at 4 in the ninth, Omar Infante beat out an infield roller off Darren O’Day, the losing pitching for the second straight day.Zach Britton entered, and Moustakas laid down a bunt that moved pinch-runner Terrance Gore to second. Alcides then sliced an opposite-field grounder inside first base to bring home Gore.Two batters later, Cain hit an RBI single.At St. Louis, Madison Bumgarner pitched shutout ball into the eighth inning and the San Francisco Giants combined just enough hitting with a couple of defensive errors by St. Louis to beat the Cardinals 3-0 in the NL Championship Series opener.Bumgarner set a major league postseason record with 26 2-3 consecutive scoreless innings on the road.The Giants lefty was in complete command while 20-game winner Adam Wainwright failed to last even five innings for the Cardinals.San Francisco has won 12 of its last 13 in the postseason, including three straight to erase a 3-1 deficit in the 2012 NLCS against St. Louis.Jake Peavy gets the Game 2 start for the Giants on Sunday night against Lance Lynn.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Ohio State holds off Illinois 6255 to end 4game skid

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) goes up for a layup. OSU won against Illinois, 62-55, Jan. 23. Credit: Kaily Cunningham / Multimedia editorA win’s a win.For the No. 17 Ohio State Buckeyes, that’s all that really matters after beating Illinois, 62-55, to put a stop to a four-game losing streak.“We try to do our best to put the losing streak behind us. This game wasn’t about that. It was about trying to come out and find a way to be better than Illinois and that’s our only goal in this game,” senior guard Aaron Craft said after the win. “We wanted to find a way to get better before this game in practice and watching film and we were able to do that. We were a tougher basketball team down the stretch than we have been, and that’s what matters.”A three-point play by junior forward LaQuinton Ross followed by a 3-pointer by senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. (his fourth of the game) and free throws down the stretch helped secure the win for OSU.“I think it was just everybody being connected tonight. I think we had…it was a lot of togetherness tonight. You see guys jumping up and down, you see fans jumping up and down. We was able to get our crowd into it. It felt good to be playing back at home, too. Having that support for you from the crowd,” Ross said. “I think it was just a group effort tonight, everybody did what they had to and pitched in.”Both teams struggled offensively early on, combining to make just five field goals in the opening nine minutes of play.Smith Jr.’s second 3-pointer of the game gave OSU the lead, 24-23, with 57 seconds remaining in the first half, but a dunk on the other end by Illini junior center Nnanna Egwu helped give Illinois the lead at the break.The Buckeyes had as many field goals (seven) as they did fouls in the first half.OSU was able to gain momentum in the second half thanks to a 9-0 run that was topped off by a 3-pointer by junior forward Sam Thompson. That gave the Buckeyes the lead, 40-34, aided by four turnovers in six possessions by the Fighting Illini.Illinois (13-7, 2-5) would not go away quietly though, as it would make back-to-back 3-pointers to stay in the game.Craft would answer with a 3-pointer shortly thereafter, but two baskets by Illinois redshirt-senior guard Joseph Bertrand and a layup by junior guard Tracy Abrams tied the game at 46.Ross would bury a three from the wing, though, and a steal by Smith Jr. lead to a layup by junior guard Shannon Scott that gave OSU a five-point advantage with 3:31 left.The Buckeyes (16-4, 3-4) were able to make enough plays late to hold off Illinois for the win.“I’m just so excited for my team right now. Got a chance to see guys smiling and I miss that,” Smith Jr. said after the win. “As a senior on this team, obviously you want to see your team smiling as much as possible. I can tell you, prior to this game there was no smiles, there was no laughter. There was none of that. Guys were kind of in their shell. And now I feel like everybody’s out now and I’m just looking forward to going forward and playing the next game with a lot of confidence.”Ross led the way for OSU with 18 points, but Smith Jr. wasn’t far behind with 16 of his own. Craft finished with 11 points, six rebounds and five assists.“I think this. Did we play perfect? No, we did not,” OSU coach Thad Matta said. “The thing I liked was I loved our energy on defense. I thought we played extremely hard. I thought we got back to rotating, seeing things the way we need to see them. And that was something going in…you know offensively, first half I’m just like, ‘here we go again.’ When (junior center) Amir (Williams) missed the dunk I’m like ‘maybe this isn’t supposed to be.’ But to the kids credit they had a different look in their eye down the stretch and give the (Schottenstein Center) a ton of (credit). I mean that crowd was as energetic as it could be and really helped us.”Bertrand scored 19 for Illinois in the loss.Next up, the Buckeyes are set to host Penn State (9-10, 0-6) Wednesday at the Schottenstein Center. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m. read more

New TCI Police sworn in assigned to CID Marine and Tactical

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, August 15, 2017 – Providenciales – Thirteen new Police officers are sworn in now and the new squad will join the Criminal Investigations Department, #CID; Tactical Unit and Marine Branch.    The men and women, hailing from Jamaica and the Philippines are trained and ready for active duty.David Barnett, Marlon Dawkins, Christopher Morrison, Robert McClean, Horace Chung, Renaldo Burke, Monique Brandford, Rory Burke, Dexter Anthony, Marlon Morse, Andrea Lewis and Carl Wynters; and from the Philippines Daphney Alcima were officially sworn in by Commissioner James Smith as Constables.A media release from the Police Force explained, the officers are presently undergoing orientation and an introduction session to the Force’s Code of Conduct.#MagneticMediaNews Related Items:#CID, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

OBITUARY James E Ashley Jr 85

first_imgSCARBOROUGH, ME — James E. Ashley, Jr., 85, passed away peacefully on Sunday, December 16, 2018, in the company of his family.Born in Portland on March 17, 1933, Jim was the son of the late James and Ethel (Dunn) Ashley. He graduated from Cheverus High School Class of 1951. Following high school, Jim honorably served his country in the United States Army where he was stationed in Iceland. When he returned home, he worked diligently to attain his bachelor’s degree from Bentley University and Northeastern University.In 1957, Jim married the love of his life, Mary Jane Naples “Napolitano”. Together, they began their young family in Somerville, Massachusetts, eventually settling in Wilmington, Massachusetts, where they raised their family. However, Jim and Mary Jane always made sure that they stayed close to their roots in Maine. The Ashley Family, along with other close family, would take treasured vacations to Higgins Beach in Scarborough, creating a lifetime of memories.Jim worked as a comptroller for many companies in the Boston area including Sweetheart Plastics, KLH & Advent eventually retiring from Semicon Inc. Following his retirement, Jim and Mary Jane decided to move back home to Maine. In his retirement, Jim really enjoyed keeping himself busy. Whether it was enjoying Sunday morning breakfast, in their reserved seats, with his wife at IHOP, collecting mallards, working for the Auto Parts store making local deliveries or keeping the books for the condo association, he remained active. In addition, he enjoyed playing golf at Willowdale, doing crossword puzzles which included his whiteout tape, reading the paper, and most of all, spending time with his grandchildren.Jim was the type of man who would do a good deed for someone else and never say a word about it. He will forever be remembered for being a very humble, devout Catholic who always put others above himself. He will be deeply missed.In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by his best friend and brother-in-law, Francis McDonald; and sister, Christina Keating.Jim is survived by his children, James E. Ashley, III and wife Sarah of Haverhill, MA, Susan M. Ashley-Kistner and husband Peter of Phoenix, AZ, Gregory M. Ashley and wife Elizabeth of Tewksbury, MA, and Christopher J. Ashley and wife Elizabeth of Chelmsford, MA. He was the loving grandfather of Jonathon, Jared, Jaelyn, Juliette, Joshua, Jonathan, Jaime, Nicholas, Meghan, Jacob, Jesse and Julia; great-grandfather of Jaquilyne. In addition, he is also survived by his brothers, Kenneth Ashley of Windham, ME and Richard Ashley of Portland, ME; as well as several nieces and nephews.Visiting Hours celebrating Jim’s life will be held on Friday, December 21 from 4-6PM at the Conroy-Tully Walker South Portland Chapel, 1024 Broadway, South Portland. Prayers will be recited at the funeral home on Saturday, December 22 at 10:15AM followed by an 11AM Mass of Christian Burial at St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish, 150 Black Point Road, Scarborough. Burial with Military Honors will follow at Calvary Cemetery, Broadway, South Portland. To view Jim’s memorial page, or to share an online condolence, please visit http://www.ConroyTullyWalker.com.Those desiring may make memorial contributions to the Barron Center, 1145 Brighton Ave, Portland, ME 04102.James E. Ashley, Jr.(NOTE: The above obituary is from Conroy-Tully Walker Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: James Thayer Hastings, 84In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Keith P. Sicard, 42In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Brandon M. Long, 27In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Meghan Markle celebrate her first Mothers Day by sharing cute picture of

first_imgMoreover, Meghan Markle paid tribute to Archie’s grandmother, Princess Diana in her Instagram post. In her Instagram caption, The Duchess of Sussex wrote the following:”Paying tribute to all mothers today – past, present, mothers-to-be, and those lost but forever remembered. We honor and celebrate each and every one of you,” Meghan wrote. “Today is Mother’s Day in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Kenya, Japan, and several countries across Europe. This is the first Mother’s Day for The Duchess of Sussex. Quote from ‘lands’: my mother was my first country; the first place I ever lived.”Following the birth of Archie, the 34-year-old Prince Harry told the media that they both are absolutely thrilled and grateful for all the love and support they have received from everybody out there. Even Meghan shared Harry’s sentiment and after introducing Archie to the world, she gushed “It’s magic, it’s pretty amazing, I have the two best guys in the world so I’m really happy.” Meghan MarkleGetty ImagesThis is Meghan Markle’s first Mother’s Day and she celebrated the event by sharing some never been seen before pictures of her son, Archie.In the UK the Mother’s Day already took place on March 22 — almost two months before Meghan Markle gave birth to Archie — but she welcomed her first child just in time to celebrate the big day in the United States of America. On such a special occasion, the 37-year-old Meghan and Prince Harry shared a sweet picture of their son Archie on Instagram.In the latest upload, we can see Archie’s adorable feet which are being pampered by his proud mother. The image was taken at their Frogmore Cottage home in Windsor. Check out the cute picture below: As per the latest report, Meghan Markle is going to spend the day at home with her husband, her mother Doria Ragland, and their cute little kid, Archie. While talking about Meghan’s mother, a source close to the situation stated that Harry gets on well with her and “new mom wants her own mom around at this time, so it’s great.”last_img read more

Morales facing defeat in key Bolivia vote early data

first_imgMorales, Bolivia‘s first indigenous head of state, promised to respect the official results of Sunday’s vote on whether he can run for re-election to extend his time in office to 19 years.But he insisted on waiting for full results to trickle in from rural areas where he has strong support.“We are going to respect the results, whether it be a No or a Yes. We always have respected them. That is democracy,” he told a news conference.“We are going to wait patiently for the final whistle from the electoral tribunal. We are optimistic,” added Morales, a keen football fan.Morales, 56, wants to run for another five-year term when his current one ends in 2020, to continue a socialist program credited with improving the fortunes of poor indigenous groups.Exit polls published by private media late Sunday indicated Morales narrowly lost the vote.An Ipsos poll for ATB television said the “No” vote had 52.3 percent to 47.7 percent for “Yes.” A survey by Mori for Unitel television gave the “No” vote 51 percent to 49 percent.Partial official results with nearly a third of votes counted on Monday showed about 62 percent for No and 38 percent for Yes.Vice President Álvaro García said the early official count was based on returns in urban areas.He warned the jubilant opposition to wait for all the results to trickle in from rural areas where Morales has strong support, and from voters abroad.The Supreme Electoral Tribunal said it expected to have an official result with 90 percent of votes counted within two days.Longest-serving presidentOpposition figures celebrated their projected victory.“Bolivia said no!” declared Santa Cruz Governor Rubén Costas.Samuel Doria Medina — defeated twice by Morales in presidential elections — said: “We have recovered democracy and the right to choose.”The early results “are showing strong support (for Morales) in the provinces, but in the main cities and even in the medium-sized ones, there is a strong ‘No’ vote,” said analyst Jorge Komadina.However, “the forces of the opposition are scattered” and lack a single leader, he said. “They are a disparate grouping of leaderships and political intentions.”Morales said ahead of the referendum that he was prepared to give up on a fourth term if voters rejected the bid.“With my record, I can leave happily and go home content. I would love to be a sports trainer,” he was quoted as saying in an interview with Spanish newspaper El País.Alleging ‘US hoax’In January, Morales became the longest serving president since Bolivia‘s independence from Spain in 1825 — rare in a country that has seen numerous military coups.He is one of a generation of Latin American leftist leaders who champion “21st-century socialism.”He has overseen robust economic growth, but opponents accuse him of presiding over corruption and investing in flashy infrastructure projects at the expense of health and education.Since first taking office, he has been strongly re-elected twice.Bolivia‘s mineral- and gas-rich economy has more than tripled in size during his decade in office.But his popularity has suffered over allegations that he used his power to influence deals in favor of CAMC, a Chinese engineering company that signed contracts worth $576 million with Bolivia.The president rejected the allegations as “a hoax by the U.S. Embassy” to discredit him, and insisted he had “nothing to hide.” LA PAZ, Bolivia — Early returns Monday indicated Bolivian President Evo Morales was facing defeat in a referendum on seeking a fourth term in power, but he sat tight pending results from his rural strongholds. Facebook Commentscenter_img Related posts:Bolivian president asks to see child born to ex-girlfriend Bolivia announces plans for nuclear research complex Bolivia’s Evo Morales marks 10 years in office Bolivia’s Morales: The US abolished Costa Rica’s armylast_img read more