Madonna dumps Warner for $120 million Live Nation deal

first_imgMadonna’s landmark deal with concert promoter Live Nation Inc. marks the latest move by the music industry to find new ways to profit from artists as CD sales slip and the Internet changes the way music is delivered. The deal – officially announced Tuesday in a joint statement by Live Nation and the Material Girl – gives the company an all-encompassing stake in her music. Financial terms were not disclosed. But the 10-year deal is worth about $120million, said a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the confidential nature of the matter. For Live Nation, the signing of Madonna was part of a push to forge similar deals with a range of artists, from superstars to emerging talent, under its new Artist Nation division. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.“Madonna is the first step to making Live Nation into the next-generation music company,” Live Nation CEO Michael Rapino said during an investor conference call. “We believe it should help attract additional artists.” The strategy has been adopted by other recording companies. Britain’s EMI Group PLC signed a similar all-encompassing rights deal with Robbie Williams in 2002. Madonna made her move after her longtime record company, Warner Music Group Corp., refused to match the terms of the Live Nation offer. Madonna said in the statement that she was drawn to the deal with Live Nation because of the changes the music business has undergone in recent years. “The paradigm in the music business has shifted, and as an artist and a businesswoman, I have to move with that shift,” Madonna said. “For the first time in my career, the way that my music can reach my fans is unlimited. I’ve never wanted to think in a limited way and with this new partnership, the possibilities are endless.” The singer still owes Warner Bros. Records another studio album and a greatest-hits album. In its own written statement, Warner Music congratulated Madonna. “She is one of the most remarkable artists of our time,” the company said, reminding her fans that Warner Music will still issue her next album and owns her catalog of recordings from the past 25 years. The deal with Live Nation encompasses future music and music-related businesses, including the Madonna brand, albums, touring, merchandising, fan club and Web site, DVDs, music-related television and film projects, and associated sponsorship agreements, the company said. Under terms of the deal, Madonna, 49, would receive a signing bonus of about $18million and a roughly $17million advance for each of three albums, the person said. A portion of the compensation would involve stock. Madonna could also benefit significantly from the touring component of the agreement, which gives Live Nation the exclusive right to promote her tours, the person said. The company said it could release its first Madonna album in two to three years and stage a tour within two years. The deal has gotten mixed reactions on Wall Street, with some analysts questioning whether Live Nation can squeeze out a significant profit. Shares of Live Nation rose 3cents to $21.45 on Tuesday. Rapino said he doesn’t understand Wall Street’s skepticism. “I’m amazed that our stock hasn’t jumped considerably in that we’re absolutely delivering what we talked about for two years,” he said, referring to Live Nation’s efforts to grab a bigger slice of the music business beyond touring. Madonna’s last tour generated nearly $200million globally, and her last album, “Confessions on a Dance Floor,” sold nearly 8million copies worldwide, Live Nation said. Still, artists generally get 90percent of ticket sales from tours, with promoters taking the rest. Album sales, meanwhile, have been in decline for most of the decade and digital sales, while growing, remain a fraction of recorded music sales. Madonna would have to stage several successful tours, release a few albums and pull in significant other revenue for Live Nation to recover the money it must pay the singer.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Richard Sherman Cites Race in DeSean Jacksons Release by

For Sports Illustrated’s Monday Morning Quarterback, Seattle Seahawks All-Pro cornerback Richard Sherman wrote about how race played a role in DeSean Jackson’s release by the Philadelphia Eagles and his relationship with his childhood friend. The Eagles cut the Pro Bowl receiver amid rumors he had connections with an L.A. gang. Jackson vehemently denied the allegations and eventually signed a three-year, $24-million contract with with the Washington Redskins.I’m not going to tell you that DeSean Jackson isn’t in a gang, because I can’t say unequivocally that he isn’t. I can’t tell you whether his friends have done the things police have accused them of doing, because I wasn’t there. I can’t tell you what DeSean does with his time, because we play football on opposite ends of the country. I can only tell you that I believe him to be a good person, and if you think, say or write otherwise without knowing the man, you’re in the wrong.And if it’s true the Eagles terminated his contract in part because they grew afraid of his alleged “gang ties,” then they did something worse. [Editor’s note: Jackson has agreed to terms with the Redskins.]I look at those words—gang ties—and I think about all the players I’ve met in the NFL and all of us who come from inner-city neighborhoods like mine in Los Angeles, and I wonder how many of us could honestly say we’re not friends with guys doing the wrong things.I can’t.I grew up in Watts, and I played baseball with DeSean in elementary school on a team coached by his father near Inglewood. His father, Bill, picked me up from elementary school 30 minutes away from his home for practice and games because my parents both worked and didn’t finish until later, and I wanted to play baseball with some childhood friends. Bill was a great coach, and a great man. He died of pancreatic cancer in 2009, the summer after his son’s rookie season. DeSean and I didn’t hang out then like we did as kids.Those men with DeSean in the social pictures and the police reports weren’t his closest friends in childhood, but when his father died and few people were there for him, they were there. When a tragic event like that happens, the people who are around are the people who are around, and they were there for him.Was DeSean supposed to then say, “Thanks guys, but now that I’m a millionaire, please leave me alone”? Even if he wanted to, he wouldn’t have. In desperate times for people who come from desperate communities, your friends become your family. I wouldn’t expect DeSean to “distance himself” from anybody, as so many people suggest pro athletes ought to do despite having no understanding of what that means. Going to college and playing in the NFL creates a natural distance, but we can’t push people away just because they’re not as successful as us. I can’t change who I grew up with, but what I can do is try to educate them on the right way of doing things, help them when they need it, and try to keep them out of trouble.There is, of course, a tipping point. There have been times when I realized that someone can’t be helped, because they continue doing the wrong things. Typically, the only time I cut someone off is when they’re in jail, because I can’t help them there.And if they’re accused of a crime, as DeSean’s friends have been, should that reflect poorly on me? Consider that for every several guys I try to help who end up dead or in jail, there’s another person I was able to rescue from a similar end. Should I give up on everybody out of fear of being dirtied by the media?Sorry, but I was born in this dirt.NFL teams understand that. The Seattle Seahawks get it. The Philadelphia Eagles apparently do not.This offseason they re-signed a player who was caught on video screaming, “I will fight every n—– here.” He was representing the Philadelphia Eagles when he said it, because, of course, everything we do is reflective of the organization. But what did they do to Riley Cooper, who, if he’s not a racist, at least has “ties” to racist activity? They fined him and sent him to counseling. No suspension necessary for Cooper and no punishment from the NFL, despite its new interest in policing our use of the N-word on the field. Riley instead got a few days off from training camp and a nice contract in the offseason, too.Commit certain crimes in this league and be a certain color, and you get help, not scorn. Look at the way many in the media wrote about Jim Irsay after his DUI arrest. Nobody suggested the Colts owner had “ties” to drug trafficking, even though he was caught driving with controlled substances (prescription pills) and $29,000 in cash to do who-knows-what with. Instead, poor millionaire Mr. Irsay needs help, some wrote.But DeSean Jackson is the menace, right? He’s just as bad as those guys he parties with because he threw up a Crip sign in a picture and he owns a gangsta rap record label. If only all record-label owners were held to this standard, somebody might realize that Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg weren’t the bosses behind NWA. Jim Irsay lookalikes in suits were.But go ahead and judge DeSean for the company he keeps. While you’re at it, judge me, too, because I still live in Los Angeles, and my family does, too. We didn’t run from where we grew up. We aren’t afraid to be associated with the people who came up with us. We brought some of our money back and started charities and tried to help out a few guys who were with us when we were nobodies.I won’t apologize for that, and I suspect neither will DeSean when he’s back on the field doing what he’s always done: grinding through adversity. read more

Venezuela opposition takes steps to seize oil revenue

first_imgVenezuelans line up as they wait for a free lunch at the “Divina Providencia” migrant shelter outskirts of Cucuta, on the Colombian-Venezuelan border, Colombia on 13 February 2019. Photo: ReutersVenezuela’s opposition leader Juan Guaido took another step Wednesday in an international bid to economically starve president Nicolas Maduro’s regime, announcing the appointment of a new board for Citgo, the US-based arm of state oil firm PDVSA.Guaido—who has been recognised as acting president by more than 50 countries and also heads the opposition-controlled National Assembly legislature, which appointed the new board—is locked in a battle with Maduro for control of the crisis-hit country.The United States, which is leading the push to topple Maduro, has sanctioned key regime financial assets including Citgo, and on Wednesday president Donald Trump once more refused to rule out military action against the leftist leader.Announcing the new six-member board on Twitter, Guaido said it “will be made up of qualified Venezuelans, who are free of corruption and without any partisan affiliation.”“With this decision, we are not only protecting our assets, we are avoiding the ongoing destruction and loss of the business,” said Guaido, who declared himself interim president after incumbent Maduro announced victory in polls the opposition said were rigged.The previous board was named by Maduro, who has presided over the economic collapse of Venezuela.The country is wracked by recession and hyperinflation, while millions of people are suffering from shortages of basic necessities such as food and medicine.‘US blockade’Venezuela earns 96 per cent of its revenues through oil but its production has dropped to a 30-year low of 1.1 million barrels a day.The US was its biggest single customer, buying almost half of its production, which represented 75 per cent of the country’s liquidity.Caracas says the “US blockade” has cost it $30 billion.In announcing the latest raft of sanctions last month, US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Citgo can continue to operate, but its earnings must be deposited into a blocked account in the United States, out of reach of Maduro’s regime.As Venezuela’s opposition moved to replace Citgo’s leadership, Trump was hosting Colombia’s president Ivan Duque for talks on the crisis gripping its Latin American neighbour.Declaring himself “sad” about the “turmoil” in the oil-rich nation, Trump demanded that Maduro unblock US aid shipments to the country, sitting on the Colombian side of the border.Key to Guaido’s strategy to oust Maduro is bringing in the aid that has been blocked by Venezuela’s military, at Maduro’s behest.Success would demonstrate to Venezuela’s people that Guaido is able to meet their needs.Maduro says the aid is a “political show” and would be a prelude to a US invasion.“You’ll see,” Trump told reporters at the White House when asked if thousands of US troops could deploy.Duque, whose country has taken in large numbers of Venezuelan refugees, also lambasted Maduro, saying that “obstructing the access of humanitarian aid is a crime against humanity.”‘Feast of hatred’“I think he’s making a terrible mistake” by not letting in the aid, Trump said of Maduro.“We’re trying to get food to people that are starving. You have people starving in Venezuela.”Maduro hit back at the two leaders, terming the meeting a “feast of hatred” and warning: “Hands off Venezuela.”At a huge opposition rally on Tuesday, Guaido vowed that humanitarian aid would enter the country on 23 February.“We have almost 300,000 Venezuelans who will die if the aid doesn’t enter,” he said.In his latest attempt to erode Maduro’s authority over the military, Guaido added: “Here is a direct order to the armed forces: allow in the humanitarian aid once and for all (and) end the repression.”Guaido’s team has met with Brazilian officials to set up a second aid storage centre on that border. The new right-wing government of President Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil has joined the growing coalition against Maduro.But Maduro has so far resisted, portraying himself in the mold of historic Latin American anti-imperialist leaders.He has backing from Russia and China, as well as his armed forces.Moscow weighed in on Tuesday, with foreign minister Sergei Lavrov warning “against all interference in Venezuela’s domestic affairs, including the use of force threatened by Washington.”There have been growing rumours about possible US preparations for some kind of military involvement ever since Trump’s hawkish national security advisor John Bolton was photographed with a notepad reading “5,000 troops to Colombia?”However, on Wednesday the State Department point man for Venezuela, Elliott Abrams, played down the idea.Military intervention “is not a path that the US government is pursuing,” he said. “I don’t see a reason” for the use of force.last_img read more

Nepal minister among 7 dead in chopper crash

first_imgNepal’s tourism minister Rabindra Adhikari was among seven people killed Wednesday when a helicopter crashed in the country’s hilly east, officials said.Rescue workers retrieved the bodies of Adhikari, 49, the pilot and five other passengers from a hillside in Taplejung district where the Air Dynasty chopper went down.”The respected minister’s body has been identified,” Ram Krishna Subedi, the spokesman for the ministry of home affairs, said in a press conference.Subedi said two army helicopters had been dispatched to bring the bodies back to the capital Kathmandu.It is unclear why the helicopter crashed.A search and rescue team was deployed to the area after locals alerted authorities to flames and smoke rising from a hillside.”The helicopter is in pieces, and scattered all over,” said Suraj Bhattarai, a witness who saw the debris.The bodies of the others killed in the crash have not yet been identified.The minister was on a trip to scope out a possible location for a new airport in the region.It is just the latest aviation accident to plague Nepal, an impoverished Himalayan nation with a poor air safety record.Nepal has some of the world’s most remote and tricky runways, flanked by snow-capped peaks with approaches that pose a challenge for even accomplished pilots.The country has a booming private helicopter industry, flying tourists and goods to remote corners of the Himalayan nation where road access is limited or non-existent.In September last year, six people including a Japanese tourist was killed when a helicopter crashed.A US-Bangla Airways plane crashed near the capital’s airport in March, killing 51 people.Nepal-based airlines are banned from flying in European Union airspace.Its poor air safety record is largely blamed on inadequate maintenance and sub-standard management.last_img read more

Harvey Means More Jobs But Does It Mean More Exploitation Too

first_img Share Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /00:00 – / 5Officials estimate Hurricane Harvey has damaged more than 126,000 homes in the Houston region. Putting things back together is a monumental job, requiring thousands of workers. But it may also be raising a risk for the most vulnerable of workers: day laborers.Like many large cities, Houston has dozens of corners where day laborers gather to find work. Many of them are undocumented, like Jose David Lizardo. He said he comes to this corner on most days, to find work.“After the catastrophe there was a lot of work,” Lizardo said, in Spanish. “But previously, there was very little [work].”And while jobs are in abundance, Lizardo said it’s difficult when an employer refuses to pay him, or puts him in danger.  “Most of the time, they come only for the labor. They do not take safety into account, [or] the protection for the workers,” Lizardo said. “These days we see a lot of racism. They see us and they know we are Hispanic. They specifically go where the Hispanics are, because they know we are looking for work….There is some fear [to report abuse], because we are not protected.”Lizardo said he feels like workers in the undocumented community are not protected, especially with the emergence of Texas’ so-called “anti-sanctuary cities” law, Senate Bill 4.  And Marianela Acuña Arreaza, Executive Director of the Fe y Justicia Worker Center, said recovery storm work augments already existing problems.“After a storm, there is definitely the urgency to get a lot of work done…. But at the same time, protecting people’s ability to take breaks when they need them. Especially when they’re still dealing with other safety risks. For example, like heat and lack of ventilation and things like that,” said Acuña. “That always exist in Houston, even before storm, but is so much worse after.”In Texas, private employers have the choice whether to provide workers’ compensation, if an injury happens on the job. That’s different than most states. And Houston Lawyer Tom Padgett said natural disasters bring up a flurry of potential hazards.“There’s going to be a big danger of exposure to chemicals, mold, disease, bacteria. That floodwater was a toxic mix—just a toxic environment,” said Padgett. “And working in those environments, you have to have the proper safety equipment.”Under federal law, all workers are entitled to safe working conditions. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) said it has 23 staff members operating in the Houston area, to identify hazards and keep safety a priority during clean up. But Padgett said it’s inherently difficult for OSHA regulations to be enforced – especially after Harvey.“I think it would be virtually impossible,” said Padgett. “If we even had enough OSHA regulators to go around and monitor, and check and make sure employers are doing it properly, they wouldn’t be able to be everywhere they needed to be.”Padgett said the economic stress that comes with post-hurricane work is also a perfect storm for wage theft.Acuña said wage theft is already a huge issue in Texas, and she has already received complaints from workers who say they are victims of wage theft from Harvey-related work.Video Playerhttps://cdn.hpm.io/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/29110257/wage-theft-video-fixed.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Acuña provided News 88.7 with this cell phone video. She said it’s from a worker who claims to have been a victim of wage theft, after working on a flooded apartment complex on the west side of Houston.But there’s also another wrinkle to post-Harvey recovery work, if you look at today’s political climate.According to the Migration Policy Institute, just under a quarter of the undocumented population in Texas works in construction. That’s over 200,000 workers who are especially vulnerable, when faced with employment issues.And undocumented worker Jose David Lizardo said it has been a problem. In addition to general wage theft and safety issues, Lizardo told News 88.7 people have routinely shouted slurs at Hispanic workers, who wait on Houston corners for day jobs. He even said one of his past employers, in Louisiana, made workers wear “Make America Great Again” hats.Lizardo said he sends money over to his family of seven, back in Honduras. And while he would like to fight for money he claims he’s owed, according to Lizardo, there’s not enough time to deal with it. He has to keep going.EDITOR’S NOTE: This story has been corrected. The Migration Policy Institute’s statistic is just under a quarter of Texas’ undocumented population works in construction; not just under a quarter of Texas construction workers are undocumented.  Xlast_img read more

Dancing on strains of poetry

first_imgSufi Kathak Foundation presents under the 22 Khwaja Project series, a programme dedicated to the Sufi Saint Hazrat Deva Sharif ‘Bedam Shah Warsi’, writing under the pen name of Bedam whose shrine is situated in a small village – Dewa of Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh.The programme  features Sufi Kathak by Manjari Chaturvedi to Sufi Music, performed by Khanqahi Qawwals, Janaab Noorul Hasan and Janaab Arshad Hussian Chisty from Awadh.Hazrat Deva Sharif popularly known as Hazrat Bedam Shah Warsi of Sarkar Waris Pak was a Sufi saint from Dewa, a small village situated in Barabanki, India, who was the successor to the Qadriyya -Razzakiyya Silsila. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Some Hindus held him in high esteem and regarded him as a perfect Sufi and a follower of Vedant Hindus. Shah was popular with English-educated youth and English-speaking men flocked to him and sat at his feet. He was the first Sufi Darvesh to visit Europe and to have attract English-speaking followers. Manjari Chaturvedi is the creator and the only performing artist of Sufi Kathak. Conceptualised and created by Manjari, Sufi Kathak has taken 13 years of her intense work in Sufi music and classical dance.   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIntroducing the mystique of Sufism in dance, she traveled to countries like Egypt, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan and worked with artists from Iran, Turkey and Morocco to study the music and dance forms related with Sufi thought. The Sufi qawwali musicians that will perform, trace their roots to traditional Sufi thought and music. The proposed Qawwal goups from Awadh Uttar Pradesh are led by Janaab Nurul Hassan, and Janaab Arshad Hussain Chishty representing the unique syncretic traditions of the Ganga-Jamuni tehzeeb of Awadh, singing the poetry of Hazrat Bedam Shah Warsi.last_img read more