Qualified for Rio! – But Jamaica’s first internationally certified badminton umpire needs money for history-making trip

first_img His son, Joshua, is accredited at Level One, and that means they are the first father-son umpires in the history of the sport. Clarke said he has approached individuals and organisations for assistance, but with time running out, he is yet to get any money. “I have to find money for airfare and visa to China and Brazil at a cost of approximately US$5,000. The organisers will provide accommodation. I have approached some people and organisations, but no confirmation as yet,” Clarke explained. “It is important to secure bookings by month end.” FATHER-SON UMPIRES He has been working hard on raising the standard of the sport in Jamaica and formed the National Association of Badminton Umpires and Court Officials in November 1997, after he returned from Guatemala. Two months before, he had earned Pan Am accreditation status as an umpire, thus becoming Jamaica’s first internationally certified umpire. In 1999, he became the nation’s first Pan Am-certified umpire, then three years later, he became Jamaica’s first and the Caribbean’s second-ever BWF-accredited umpire. He is a founding member of Racketeers Badminton Club that hosts an annual tournament here, and is currently a JBA vice-president. He is a past president of the local body as well as past president of the regional body, CAREBACO. Also, he once served as first vice-president of the Central American and Caribbean Badminton Association. Clarke said he would be disappointed if things did not work out for him to travel to China and ultimately the Rio Games. “It is a big thing to officiate at the Olympics. They (organisers) want global representation, so this is Jamaica’s chance. If we are to miss out, Trevor McCain is the closest to me in ranking. He is a Pan Am-certified umpire, but that is only the second of four levels needed,” he noted. “I’m trying to raise the money for both events, but nothing confirmed. However, I remain hopeful of securing the necessary funds to make both trips,” Clarke stressed. Jamaica’s first and only Badminton World Federation (BWF) umpire, Joseph Clarke, is in need of US$5,000 (approximately $600,000) to officiate at the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Clarke said that to become Jamaica’s first badminton umpire at the Olympic Games, he must officiate at the Thomas and Huber World Championship in China this year. “I have two assignments this year. First one is the Thomas and Huber World Championships in China in May. This would be a first for a Jamaican in the final. It is a prerequisite to get to the Olympics,” Clarke told The Gleaner. “If I don’t make it, it could be another 10 years for another Jamaican,” he reasoned. He has been involved in the sport for more than 35 years as a player, coach, administrator and official. RAISING THE STANDARD OF THE SPORTlast_img read more

Postal Service Files for Special Rate Increase in January

first_imgMeanwhile, a joint filing by four industry mail groups including Magazine Publishers of America says no way. “The court left in place the Commission’s findings that the Postal Service had submitted no evidence indicating that its request was causally related to the recession, and that the Postal Service’s financial problems were caused in large part by longstanding structural issues, not the recession.” When it comes to the “Three P’s”–printer, postage and paper–postage costs have exploded in recent years, Cygnus Business Media vice president of operations Tom Martin told FOLIO:. “In 2000, printing was 45 percent to 55 percent of costs, paper was probably 20 to 25 percent of costs, and postage was between 30 to 32 percent. If you look at today’s costs, the printer has probably lost 15 to 20 points because the printer is probably sitting with only 32 percent of overall costs. Paper hasn’t changed that much but the number that has changed tremendously is postage. That’s probably sitting at 46 percent of overall costs depending on the magazine.” Thought the postal battle had achieved temporary détente? Think again.The U.S. Postal Service this week asked the Postal Regulatory Commission to let it implement an exigent rate increase averaging more than 4 percent across most classes of mail in order to make up for volume lost during the recession, reports anonymous blogger Dead Tree Edition. Last year, the PRC denied a similar request to boots rates by as much as 8 percent, saying that USPS cashflow problems were not the result of the recession. However, a federal court has ordered the PRC to review that ruling. “The Postal Service suffered financial harm directly associated with extraordinary and exceptional volume losses that the [inflation-based] price cap mechanism is incapable of addressing,” the USPS brief says. “The Postal Service respectfully requests that the Commission recognize $2.34 billion as a plausible lower-bound estimate of the Postal Service’s financial harm ‘due to’ recession-related volume losses in FY 2008 and FY2009, and approve exigent rate increases (for January 2012 implementation) on that basis.”last_img read more

Kapil Sharmas shocking transformation after marriage revealed by Bharti Singh

first_imgKapil Sharma and wife GinniinstagramThe ups and downs in Kapil Sharma’s life can very well be perceived to have been lifted straight out of a Bollywood script. From struggling days, immense success to instant stardom and fall-down; the ace comedian has really had a roller-coaster ride in both personal and professional life. However, just like any other filmy hero, Kapil, has decided to bounce back and how!Kappu, as the industry loves to call him, has not only tied the knot with the love of his life – Ginni Chathrath but has also left behind alcohol and smoking. And amidst all his trials and tribulations, one person who has stood rock solid behind him has been his wife – Ginni. Bharti Singh, who plays an integral part in the Kapil Sharma show has spoken up fondly about how Ginni has brought along a massive change in Sharma.In an interview with Pinkvilla, Bharti has said that Kapil Sharma not only comes on time now but also makes sure that no one has to stay late because of him. Bharti, who plays Titli, says Ginni has brought along a positive influence in Kapil’s life and also sends food for the entire team many times.”He comes on the sets cut to cut and is always on time. We always finish the shoot on time and I always think that Ginni is very lucky and she is very sweet. She sends food not just for Kapil, but also for all of us. Ginni is taking great care of Kapil, right from yoga to sending him to the gym to boiled vegetables and everything else. Kapil bhai has also become very calm and patient,” Bharti said.Well, we are sure Kapil would bounce and never look back at failures again.last_img read more

Lightning kills 7 in 5 dists

first_imgFile photo of LightningSeven people were killed and 10 others injured in separate lightning strikes in five districts on Thursday, reports UNB.The five districts are Habiganj, Meherpur, Cumilla, Satkhira and Netrakona.In Habiganj, a farmer and a schoolgirl were killed when thunder bolts hit them in separate places in Baniachong upazila.The deceased were identified as Tarin, 15, daughter of Jahir Miah and a class IX student of Sujatpur High School and farmer Mizanur Rahman, residents of Sotomukha village in Sujatpur union.Tarin’s father Jahir Miah said a thunderbolt hit Tarin while working at the court yard of their house and she died on the spot.Besides, Mizanur was killed in lightning while he was cutting paddy at Daulatpur haor.In Meherpur, Helu Zoarder, 55, son of Nabin Zoarder of Mohammadpur village, was killed as a lightning struck him while he was working at the field of the village in Gangi upazila around 11:00am.Besides, six people were injured in lightning strikes at Mohammadpur, Kasba and Motmura villages of the upazila.In Cumilla, Md Ishak Miah, 55, a former union parishad member, was killed after being hit by a lightning at Baira village in Nangolkot upazila.The incident took place while cleaning hyacinth from his pond at noon.In Satkhira, a thunderbolt hit Ashraf Hossain, 28, son of late Abdul Majid of Ghola village in Shyamnagar upazila, while working at his fish enclosure, leaving him dead on the spot.In another incident, Aminur Rahman, 16, son of Abdus Sattar of Gangati village, was killed and two other teenage boys were injured as a streak of lightning hit him while he was sitting at the veranda of a mosque after saying zohr prayers.The injured are Mizanur Rahman, 15 and Akhterul Islam, 17.In Netrakona, Mitu Akhter, 12, daughter of Habibur Rahman, was killed and her grandmother Safura Begum and younger brother Rakib Hossain, 8, were injured in a lightning strike at Atithpur village in Barhatta upazila.last_img read more

Dutch study suggests WiFi possibly harmful to trees

first_img More information: Wageningen University original (Dutch): www.wageningenuniversity.nl/NL … euws/Bomen101120.htm (PhysOrg.com) — A new study carried out in the Netherlands suggests radiation from Wi-Fi networks may be damaging trees and affecting the growth of other plants near routers. Image: Wikipedia. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Dutch study suggests Wi-Fi possibly harmful to trees (2010, November 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-dutch-wi-fi-possibly-trees.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com Shade trees fight global warming in Calif. Explore further Scientists from Wageningen University were asked to carry out the study five years ago after local officials in Alphen aan den Rijn noted that ash trees planted near a wireless router were suffering from bleeding bark, cracks, lumps, discolorations, and their leaves were dying. No bacterial or viral infection could be identified in the trees.The researchers, led by Dr. A.A.M. van Lammeren, exposed small ash trees and other plants to six sources of radiation at frequencies varying from 2412 to 2472 MHz and a capacity of 100 mW EIRP, the range common for Wi-Fi. The plants were placed at distances varying from 50 to 300 cm for a period of more than three months. The results revealed that in trees closest to the Wi-Fi source the upper and lower epidermis (skin) of the leaves developed a metallic luster and began to die off. A survey of trees in urban areas in the Netherlands showed 70 percent of all deciduous trees had similar symptoms, compared to only 10 percent five years ago, while in wooded areas away from urban centers trees were unaffected.Reports on the study may inflame concerns in some over locating wireless routers in schools and fears radiation from them may affect humans as well as trees, but the scientists concerned stress the findings are preliminary and no far-reaching conclusions can be made. The researchers say larger scale research is needed over a longer period to confirm the findings. It is unclear whether the experiments ruled out other possible factors such as the presence of more pollution in urban areas than forests. The study also acknowledges that other research carried out elsewhere has shown Wi-Fi radiation has no detrimental effects.The study will be the subject of a conference in the Netherlands in February next year.last_img read more