Homelessness in San Diego

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Homelessness FacebookTwitter January 9, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Homelessness in San Diego KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsAlthough many steps have been taken to try and improve the homeless issue in San Diego, it continues to be a topic of concern.KUSI was joined by founder of Homelessness News San Diego, Michael McConnell, with more on the problem the city is facing. Posted: January 9, 2018last_img read more

Sleepless nights for Bangladesh flagmakers

first_imgThis photograph taken on 17 May 2018 shows a Bangladeshi worker sewing flags for world cup football playing nations in Narayanganj, on the outskirts of Dhaka, ahead of the 2018 football World Cup. Photo: AFPFlagmakers in Bangladesh are doing a roaring trade weeks ahead of the World Cup, but no-one is interested in the home nation’s colours-the money is all on pennants for Lionel Messi’s Argentina and Neymar’s Brazil.Textile printer Kamal Hossain owns one of scores of small, hot, sweaty workshops in the Merajnagar of capital Dhaka, working flat-out to produce flags and pennants for the local market ahead of the tournament in Russia.“For the last two months I have been working non-stop,” said Hossain.“There are days when I do not even get two hours of sleep,” added the 40-year-old, barely lifting his head from his screen-printing machine.Bangladesh is traditionally cricket territory, but every four years the country of 160 million people-whose national team is ranked 197th out of 202 in the world by FIFA-goes World Cup crazy.Flags in the colours of Argentina and Brazil take over the streets, and printers in Merajnagar are expecting to produce hundreds of thousands before the tournament starts in Moscow on 14 June.Homes have been converted into makeshift printing and sewing plants as orders pour in from across the country.“Every day we’re printing and making thousands of flags. Today we’ve already printed 11,000 Argentina pennants,” said Hossain.This photograph taken on 17 May 2018, shows Salim Hawalader, owner of a factory that produces national flags, hanging Argentine flags in Narayanganj, on the outskirts of Dhaka, ahead of the 2018 football World Cup. Photo: AFPMaradona to MessiFans across Bangladesh hold flag-waving processions to honour their favourite team. Last week, a video of supporters marching with a 200 metre-long Argentina flag in the northwestern town of Madarganj went viral on social media.The impoverished country first saw live World Cup matches in 1982.But it was the 1986 tournament, when Diego Maradona single-handedly helped Argentina win the trophy, that cemented football into the Bangladesh psyche-along with a new favourite team.“The craze for Argentina is still going strong, Maradona is gone but Messi is the new superstar,” said Faruq Mia, a flag hawker who came from neighbouring Narayanganj district to stock up.Mia bought 500 flags last week, made a big profit and so needs 500 more. He will be cheering for Argentina.Factory owner Selim Howlader expects to sell several hundred thousand flags as “World Cup fever came early in the country, months before kickoff”.“In 2014, I sold more than 80,000 flags. Most of them were sold during the World Cup or just days before kickoff. Now I am selling 2,000-2,500 big flags and 10,000 pennants a day and the World Cup is still weeks away,” said the happy 33-year-old businessman.Howlader employs 25 workers and said about 2,000 people in all are working in Merajnagar’s flag factories.Long hoursMessi and Neymar’s teams dominate by far Howlader’s order list. “Argentina and Brazil are the two most popular teams in Bangladesh,” he said.This photograph taken on 17 May 2018 shows a Bangladeshi worker using a silk-screen for printing a Brazil flag in Narayanganj, on the outskirts of Dhaka, ahead of the 2018 football World Cup. Photo: AFP“I have even got orders to make 50-foot long Argentine flags. These two teams have the most supporters in our country. Germany, Spain and Portugal are the other popular teams.”Some four million people work in Bangladesh’s 4,500 apparel factories, who provide billions of dollars worth of clothes to top retailers around the world.But experts and rights groups say that while there has been progress in improving conditions for garment workers in the country, they still often face long hours, dangerous working environments and dismally low pay.The flag boom means extra income for poor workers like Nargis Akhter, 28, and her husband Mohammad Iqbal who work in Howlader’s factory.“On an average every day we make 3,000 taka ($35),” said Iqbal. An average garment factory pays about $70 for an entire month’s work-among the world’s lowest wages for such a job.“I wish the craze for flags would go on for many more months,” said Akhter, with a smile.last_img read more

Muhith proposes bus for schools in Dhaka

first_imgFinance minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith on Thursday proposed to provide buses for schools in DhakaFinance minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith on Thursday proposed to provide buses for schools in Dhaka.He told the parliament, students using their family cars contribute to the traffic jam in the capital. “Most of the schools in Dhaka do not provide buses.”He expressed hope that the dedicated bus service would promote safer and easier commute as in developing countries.Muhith added, “Concession or exemption of duties will be considered on importation of school buses”.last_img read more

7member panel to probe DUCSU polls irregularities

first_imgFile PhotoDhaka University (DU) vice-chancellor Akhtaruzzaman has formed a seven-member probe panel to look into the allegations of irregularities in the elections to DU Central Student’s Union (DUCSU) and hall unions, reports UNB.Sajeda Banu, a supernumerary professor of the Mathematics department, has been made chief of the committee while assistant proctor of the university M Maksudur Rahman its member secretary, said a DU press release on Thursday.The other members of the investigation committee are dean of Biological Science faculty Imdadul Hoque, provosts of Sir PJ Hartog International Hall Mohiuddin, chairman of Economics department Shafique uz Zaman, syndicate member Mohammad Humayun Kabir and professor Sharmin Rumi Alim of the Nutrition and Food Science Institute.The committee has been asked to submit its report within seven working days.last_img read more

India flood victim gives birth after helicopter rescue

first_imgThis handout photograph released by the Indian Navy on 18 August 2018 shows Sajita Jabeel, 25, with her newborn boy in a hospital in Kochi, after she was rescued while heavily pregnant from a roof in a flood affected area of Kochi in the southern state of Kerala. Photo: AFPA heavily pregnant woman stranded by floods in the Indian state of Kerala gave birth just after being airlifted to safety, an Indian Navy spokesman said, as the military stepped up rescue operations on Saturday.Dozens of navy helicopters have embarked on high-risk missions to save people from rooftops and isolated land as the southern state battles a flood crisis that has left at least 324 people dead.Sajita Jabeel, 25, was winched up by Commander Vijay Verma, who has been widely praised for leading the rescue in the Aluva district of the state’s main city Kochi.”The lady was in labour, her water had broken,” Verma told News18 television.He called the relief mission “very challenging” and said his team had rushed to find the family after receiving an emergency call.”We took a doctor along, we winched her up, it took some time though because we had to winch down two people to help her.”Jabeel gave birth to a healthy baby boy after being rushed to hospital.People are airlifted by the Indian Navy soldiers during a rescue operation at a flooded area in the southern state of Kerala, India on 17 August 2018. Photo: ReutersKerala, popular among international tourists for its tropical hills and beaches, has been battered by record monsoon rainfall this year.About 60 military and coast guard helicopters and hundreds of boats are scouring the flood zones across the state for trapped victims.The military said that tens of thousands have been rescued in the past week, but thousands more are feared trapped.Another pilot winched 26 people up from a rooftop in Kochi on Friday while hovering between trees and other houses just two days after receiving a medal for saving a fisherman last year.A video of P. Rajkumar’s Sea King helicopter pulling up the victims has been widely shared on social media. He ended up with 32 people on board.”It was a life-threatening mission but it’s an unprecedented situation. We can’t leave behind our people,” Indian Navy spokesman DK Sharma told AFP.Rajkumar was given the Shaurya Chakra medal for bravery this week after lifting a fisherman from the sea when cyclone Ockhi hit India last year.last_img read more

A Minimum 6M Settlement Disclosed in Baltimore Public Housing SexforRepairs Lawsuit

first_imgBALTIMORE (AP) — The lawyer representing women who said maintenance workers demanded sex from them in exchange for basic repairs at public housing units in Baltimore says a settlement of at least $6 million has been reached.Cary J. Hansel said at a news conference Friday that all victims of sexual harassment in public housing will be eligible for the settlement. Hansel said the settlement amount will range from $6 million to $7.95 million, depending on how many join the lawsuit.The lawsuit included accounts by women who alleged they had been victimized by handymen whose neglect resulted in squalid conditions including leaks, insect infestations and dangerous mold growth.Housing Authority Commissioner Paul T. Graziano has said the agency will make sure this doesn’t happen again.last_img read more

Baltimore Dont Believe the Hype

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, Baltimore AFRO Editorsyoes@afro.comI don’t remember a time quite like this in Baltimore; to paraphrase the great Chinua Achebe, everything is falling apart.As we continue to reel in the aftermath of the Uprising, which was sparked four years ago this month after the death of Freddie Gray (ruled a homicide) in police custody, the city’s physical and political infrastructures continue to crumble. Since the Uprising, we’ve had the consent decree, five police commissioners, the Gun Trace Task Force, the murder of Det. Sean Suiter and one of those police commissioners, Darryl De Sousa, headed to federal prison for tax crimes.The latest brick in the city’s towering wall of shame is a burgeoning ethics scandal seemingly drowning the mayoral reign of Catherine Pugh, who has taken an indefinite leave of absence from the mayor’s chair (currently filled by City Council President Bernard “Jack” Young).And despite the public assertions of some members of Pugh’s staff that the mayor intends to return to her post, Pugh’s path to a second term seems dubious at best; impossible is more like it. I don’t know if the mayor broke any laws (she and her supporters say she didn’t), but there are powerful people in this state who are trying to charge her criminally.Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)Let’s not get it twisted: Mayor Pugh got messed up in the game because Mayor Pugh got messed up in the game. But, is she the first politician in Mobtown to play?No disrespect to the memory of William Donald Schaefer. He was arguably the most effective mayor in Baltimore’s history and I’m not accusing him of criminality and I have no evidence he ever broke any laws; but, it seems implausible that Schaeffer during a protean political career as a member of the Baltimore City Council, city council president, mayor of Baltimore, governor of Maryland and Maryland comptroller never had to directly engage quid pro quo in a statewide political apparatus rife with it.We can debate the inequity of Baltimore’s political machinations (and we should) to exhaustion. But, the more pressing question for us as a city is how do we move forward?A couple of days ago I heard the editorial of Dan Joerres, president and general manager of WBAL TV, and his words actually stopped me in my tracks.“In the early 2000s billboards around town had the single word “believe” in bold white letters on a black background. Rather than a statement, today’s version would probably ask the question, “believe in what?”” said Joerres.I don’t know Joerres and as we say in West Baltimore, “I don’t mean no harm,” but for him to invoke the amorphous slogan crafted by then Baltimore Mayor Martin O’Malley, the same man who gave us the so-called zero tolerance policing policy is borderline diabolical.“Our situation may call for a real life bat signal, not calling for any one superhero, but many to rescue our town,” Joerres added. “We are calling on all young minds, fresh perspectives, with the aptitude, the desire and the moral compass to lead…new faces of fearlessness willing to develop plans to rid our streets of crime with both strength and compassion.”Then Joerres ended his soliloquy with a cute little bow.  “It’s time to believe again,” he said. Again, I don’t mean no harm but, my ears translate “it’s time to believe again,” to “let’s make Baltimore great again.”So, here’s the thing: there are hundreds of young (and older), talented, brilliant, fearless, dedicated daughters and sons of this city, who literally risk their lives everyday in an effort to “rescue our town.” I actually wrote a book partly dedicated to them and their heroics. So, what we need to do instead of looking for mysterious superheros to come and save the day, we need to uplift, invest in and support the myriad superheros already on the ground doing the grimy work of keeping this city from being torn asunder.However, I suspect there is one universal truth for all of us who love our city–we’re pretty much out of time. And saving our city demands manifestly more than the unearthing of a feckless slogan.last_img read more

EA kills Online Pass due to negative feedback from gamers

first_imgAlongside piracy, video game publishers also hate the used games market as there’s no profit in it for them. Some publishers have tried to counteract such sales by requiring an additional payment for certain in-game features if you buy used. EA’s answer to that was Online Pass.For the games that used Online Pass, EA required you enter a code after purchase to unlock features such as online multiplayer. If that game was then traded in and bought by someone else, EA required an additional payment from them to unlock that same Online Pass-protected content. Typically this would cost around $10.Online Pass was introduced in 2010 and is for the most part not well liked among gamers. Some games use it, while others don’t. It’s also not immediately clear when buying a game used that you’ll have to purchase an Online Pass and what doing so unlocks in the game. Worst of all, Online Pass typically unlocks content that requires a server (e.g. multiplayer), and EA is well known for regularly shutting down online access to older titles. So you could end up paying for an Online Pass only to find the functionality it unlocks is no longer available a few months later.So gamers will be glad to hear that EA has decided to kill Online Pass. EA’s senior director of corporate communications, John Reseburg, explained that the decision is in response to players not responding well to the format. That’s corporate speak for everyone hated it and we finally decided to listen.EA has clearly moved on from Online Pass and is using other methods to try and boost revenue from game releases. Examples include requiring a constant Internet connection to play certain titles, such as SimCity, which makes piracy very difficult and means there is no used market for that title. We also see DLC and micro-transactions being used more heavily. A good example of that is Dead Space 3, which had over $50 worth of additional content to buy on top of the initial game cost.last_img read more

A manmade material that mimics the curling of the mimosa leaflet

first_img Play Static self-assembling properties of circular-shaped Janus bilayer demonstrating artificial tropism in response to a microdroplet. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen In addition to providing a roadmap for the development of a new class of self-organizing materials, the team believes their material could be used in a wide variety of applications, ranging from sensors built into clothes (which could self-activate when exposed to sweat) to sensors made for responding to other bodily fluids. It might even prove suitable for harvesting water from fog or for creating micro-robotic devices programmed by shape. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Researchers create tiny pump that provides continuous and spontaneous antigravity water delivery (Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from the Australian National University and City University of Hong Kong has created a material that is capable of mimicking the action of a mimosa leaflet when it is touched. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their material and how it reacts when a drop of liquid is deposited onto its surface. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2016 Phys.org Explore furthercenter_img More information: W. S. Y. Wong et al. Mimosa Origami: A nanostructure-enabled directional self-organization regime of materials, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600417AbstractOne of the innate fundamentals of living systems is their ability to respond toward distinct stimuli by various self-organization behaviors. Despite extensive progress, the engineering of spontaneous motion in man-made inorganic materials still lacks the directionality and scale observed in nature. We report the directional self-organization of soft materials into three-dimensional geometries by the rapid propagation of a folding stimulus along a predetermined path. We engineer a unique Janus bilayer architecture with superior chemical and mechanical properties that enables the efficient transformation of surface energy into directional kinetic and elastic energies. This Janus bilayer can respond to pinpoint water stimuli by a rapid, several-centimeters-long self-assembly that is reminiscent of the Mimosa pudica’s leaflet folding. The Janus bilayers also shuttle water at flow rates up to two orders of magnitude higher than traditional wicking-based devices, reaching velocities of 8 cm/s and flow rates of 4.7 μl/s. This self-organization regime enables the ease of fabricating curved, bent, and split flexible channels with lengths greater than 10 cm, demonstrating immense potential for microfluidics, biosensors, and water purification applications.Press release Citation: A man-made material that mimics the curling of the mimosa leaflet (2016, June 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-man-made-material-mimics-mimosa-leaflet.html Play Mimosa Origami assembly of the Janus bilayer strips performing double right-angle turns on a superhydrophobic PS-PDMS substrate. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 Play Modular microfluidics: Janus-based Mimosa Origami strips with double-ended bulbs on a superhydrophobic PS-PDMS substrate showing in-channel droplet mixing. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 Journal information: Science Advances As the researchers note, nature is filled with examples of living systems that react to stimuli by engaging in self-organization behaviors. One such example is the fern-like mimosa plant, it has multiple leaflets along individual twigs that are each independently sensitive to touch—such stimuli (such as children over the generations having some fun with their friends) causes the leaflet to curl up into a hollow tube shape resembling a very small straw. Developing materials with similar characteristics is highly desirable because it allows for creating unique products, such as very low power sensors.In this new effort, the researchers created the new material by fashioning stacks of multi-function layers of a Janus nanoparticle based material (offering opposite hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties) to a bottom layer made of polyvinyl chloride microfibers. The result was a thin length of flat white material with a larger round formation at one end. When a liquid was dropped onto the round formation, the liquid was pushed, through self-action, by the material all the way to the other end—as it was pushed, the material curled from one end to the other, resulting in what looked like an ordinary straw. The researchers report that the action was fast, taking just 33 milliseconds to get started. They note also that the self-action was reversible as well—as the material dried, it flattened. Play Modular microfluidics: Janus-based Mimosa Origami strips at a T-junction, showcasing double-ended split for potential in multichannel capabilities. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Girls with diabetes at high risk of irregular periods

first_imgGirls diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have a high frequency of menstrual irregularities, a study has found. Menstrual irregularities can have a variety of causes, including pregnancy, hormonal imbalances, infections, diseases, trauma and certain medications.Adult women with obesity are known to be at risk for menstrual disorders like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can lead to the development of diabetes or other metabolic problems. However, little is known about the reproductive function in girls with youth-onset type 2 diabetes. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”It’s important for girls with type 2 diabetes to be assessed for menstrual problems,” said Megan Kelsey from University of Colorado in the US.”Infrequent periods can be associated with heavy and painful periods, increased risk for fatty liver disease, fertility problems and long-term increased risk for endometrial cancer,” said Kelsey.The researchers performed a secondary analysis of the data from the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Youth (TODAY) study, a research study to find the best way to treat young people with type 2 diabetes. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe new analysis focused on evaluating the frequency of menstrual irregularity in girls with recently diagnosed diabetes and whether the addition of intensive lifestyle or rosiglitazone to previous treatment with metformin helped to improve symptoms.These treatments are often used to treat both diabetes and PCOS.The researchers found that more than 20 per cent of girls in the study had irregular periods. Many of those girls also had high testosterone levels, pointing to PCOS as an underlying cause. Not all the girls with irregular periods had elevated testosterone, suggesting other causes for menstrual dysfunction. Despite two years of intensive treatment with either metformin alone, metformin and lifestyle changes, or metformin and rosiglitazone, the participants still had significantly irregular periods.”Our findings suggest that girls with youth-onset diabetes may need the additional intervention above and beyond to improve their menstrual health.”last_img read more