One of Europe’s largest regional airlines, Flybe, has declared bankruptcy

first_imgThe last flights of the Exeter-based airline ended at British airports late last night, after hours of speculation that the company would cease operations. Flybe had been in financial trouble for some time, and fewer passengers due to the outbreak of coronavirus was crucial. Photo: Fb Flybe So Flybe announced today that their planes were grounded, and told its passengers not to come to the airports unless they had arranged a flight with another airline in the meantime.The airline was bought a year ago by a consortium led by Virgin Atlantic, which has invested at least £ 100 million, but Flybe needed more.center_img During the day, railway companies in the UK offered free travel to staff as well as Flybe customers for the next seven days. By the way, Flybe was founded in 1979 and was the largest regional airline, which until yesterday employed about 2000 people. Although he was primarily a regional airline, his planes also flew to some European destinations, including Croatia.last_img read more

Dutch open first ‘poop bank’ to treat gut diseases

first_imgPhoto credit: www.livescience.comTHE HAGUE, Netherlands (AFP) — After blood and sperm banks, Dutch researchers have now opened the country’s first “poop bank” in a rare and cutting-edge branch of medicine to treat people with chronic gut infections.“Our poop bank will help give doctors and hospitals access to transplants of faecal matter,” Ed Kuijper, professor of microbiology at Leiden University, told AFP.The Netherlands Donor Faeces Bank (NDFB) will collect, store and distribute the stools necessary to help with such transplants.Often this is the “only solution for people suffering from chronic intestinal infections, and in particular ‘Clostridium difficile (CD)’,” a bacteria which can develop in patients particularly after lengthy and heavy courses of antibiotics, Kuijper said.“Certain antibiotics destroy intestinal flora which allows bacteria to develop and spread,” he explained.“Transplants of faecal matter allow healthy bacteria to be put back into the body, which then spread in the intestines and recreate healthy flora in the gut.”There are about 3,000 people diagnosed with CD annually in the Netherlands, and about five per cent of cases become chronic. About three to four transplants of faecal material are carried out in the country every month.In some cases, such infections can be fatal after triggering severe diarrhoea, inflammation of the colon and even intestinal perforations.Donors must be “in good health, neither too overweight nor too skinny and must have good intestinal flora”, said Kuijper.Unlike in the United States, where the first two poop banks were opened last year, donors are not paid. Donations are collected at home, and the donor remains anonymous.The donated stools are taken to the bank in western city of Leiden and then transformed into a product which can be transplanted either through a nasal endoscopy or implanted directly via a colonoscopy.It is hoped the “poop bank” will also aid research into other illnesses and may be adapted for other conditions such as the debilitating Crohn’s disease.“Stool donations are not as accepted yet as blood donations,” Kuipjer acknowledged.“But I think it’s a question of what people are used to, and donors are offering the possibility of a safe treatment to patients suffering from what is a difficult illness.” 119 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Dutch open first ‘poop bank’ to treat gut diseases by: Associated Free Press – February 17, 2016 Share Sharelast_img read more

Stamina and Spirit Fueled Recovery from Sandy

first_imgBut many still sufferingBy Muriel J. Smith and Danielle SchipaniPhotographs may have told the story three years ago, but stamina, hope, and spirit have painted an entirely new picture three years after Super Storm Sandy swept through the Bayshore, Sea Bright and Monmouth Beach taking homes, buildings, and lifetimes of memories away with it.And today, people in those towns are still struggling but have already proven their determination that no storm, including one as historic as Sandy, is going to keep them from living their lives.HighlandsHighlands Borough Administrator Tim Hill can tell the story in statistics for his community: more than $10 million in property damage to borough property alone; untold millions in damage to hundreds of people who live here, some of whom are still patiently – or impatiently – waiting for promised help, some of whom have called it a day and moved on, leaving their properties up for sale.It takes a lot to live past having three to eight feet of water in your home.But others have taken positive stands and fought back valiantly, although with an immense amount of frustration over paperwork, time constraints, and bureaucracy, Hill said.In total, 128 residences have been demolished, including about 60 in the trailer park that used to have that spectacular setting directly on Sandy Hook Bay. The trailers are gone, the owners have moved on, and the property is currently under construction for luxurious new condominiums. Sandy Hook Bay Marina is also gone, and rising in its stead is a modern new marina complete with a lighthouse filled with amenities for boat owners and a top-of-the-line restaurant with unsurpassed views of Manhattan.Another 245 permits have been issued for elevation of homes, Hill said, people who want to stay exactly where they are, albeit the 12 or 14 feet above sea level FEMA now demands. All of these permits represent work either under way or already completed.Another 64 permits have been issued for new housing, Hill continued, with more permits issued for renovations.About 40 to 50 properties have been abandoned. The borough is working with the Department of Community Affairs now looking to the possibility of demolition of some of these sites, Hill said, hopeful that another 20 will be able to be demolished for improvements to the entire neighborhood.Photo by Tina ColellaWorking through all the agencies, filing all the plans, meeting all the requirements and still running the routine business of the community isn’t an easy task, but Hill has risen to meet every obligation. He is continuing to work closely with FEMA and the other agencies in order to negotiate the best financial assistance the borough can get for its own municipal building. Located on Bay Avenue and completely devastated by Sandy, the governing body is still trying to make the determination of what is the best move for renewal. FEMA and other agencies have not yet determined the amount of financial assistance they will give; the governing body is waiting for that figure to see whether it’s more feasible to rebuild on site, which leaves the borough offices still within the 500-year flood plan, or move to higher ground with another facility. Hill, who has been working on the project closely with all agencies since Sandy, remains hopeful a final decision will be reached by the end of the year. In the meantime, the police department is working out of multiple trailers at a 27 Shore Drive address, borough offices are located in more trailers at a 42 Shore Drive address, and the construction office is located at 19 Bay Ave. in yet another trailer.“Overall, I’d say we’re only at 50 percent recovery,” the administrator said, “but I can’t begin to tell you how incredible the people of Highlands are. What they have done on their own, how they have given life to their own property is beyond description. The council will do the best it can with the funding it gets. But it still has to face the infrastructure issues…repairs, repaving of roads, routine maintenance of all our utilities. There’s a lot that still has to be done.”Atlantic HighlandsIn Atlantic Highlands, the neighboring community that for the most part sits higher above sea level than Highlands had approximately $3 million in damages outside of the $22 million in devastation at the municipal yacht harbor. Most of the property damage was on the west side of First Avenue in the area of Many Mind Creek, according to borough administrator Adam Hubeny, since the deluge from Sandy caused the creek to overflow and damage homes and businesses. Hubeny estimated that approximately 100 homes suffered little to moderate damage, and a few had to be torn down. Of six that were substantially damaged he said, one is currently being rebuilt, four have been completed, and one owner has had his house demolished and has the property for sale.The administrator also pointed to the frustration residents have had to face, saying many are still being frustrated by all the regulations, paperwork and requirements that have to be accomplished to meet government standards.Photo by Tina Colella“We had substantial damage at the harbor, there is no denying that,” Hubeny said, “but that’s business, and boats. And while that is bad enough, it isn’t people’s homes and lives. This is what makes the $2 million in land loss so devastating. If there’s any one thing that has come out of Sandy,” he said, optimistically, “it’s that valuable lessons have been learned about preparing for storms, heeding messages and taking swift actions when necessary.”Harbor Commissioner Jane Frotton, lamented the frustration residents feel and concedes the Harbor Commission was fortunate to have connections at several levels of government that enabled them to get funds and have their renovations completed.Frotton was chairman of the Harbor Commission during Super Storm Sandy and, being on-site immediately after the storm sizing up the total damages in the millions, she quickly contacted  Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno. “I was on the commission during the 1992 nor-easter,” Frotton said, “and comparing this to the damage we had then, I knew we were upwards of $20 million and needed all the help we could get.”Guadagno put the commission in touch with the correct state officials and offices and authorizing the borough to waive time consuming permit applications. Congressman Frank Pallone responded to calls to his office with immediate federal aid, securing thousands of dollars for the community, and businessmen leasing commission property took renovations into their own hands as well. “Bernie Sweeney was out there the day after Sandy sweeping up glass, clearing debris, working hard on the Shore Casino,” Frotton recalls. “He suffered a lot of damage to the interior of the restaurant and the Harbor insurance on its buildings could never cover the amount of damage so many received. But working together, and doing so much on his own, Bernie was able to still cater a large scheduled event by February.”  The harbor also saw damage to more than 600 boats, both in the water and on land storage.But today, the harbor is fully operational, has a waiting list for slips at the new floating docks and never lost a season of operation, being able to operate on a more limited basis the first spring after the storm. The tow boat building which was destroyed in now being rebuilt, and just about everything in the water, with the exception of pilings, has been replaced with more storm-resilient materials. “Our people were strong, aggressive, and worked hard to get the job done as a team,” Frotton said, adding her praise to Hubeny’s concerning the residents and business population of the borough.Sea BrightSea Bright is among the towns that have seen improvements in the last three years since the super storm. “Sea Bright in comparison to other towns has rebounded very well,” said Christopher Wood, board member of the nonprofit organization Sea Bright Rising. “It is an ongoing process and I look forward to more improvement over the next few years. Sea Bright has a pulse, there is no doubt about it. There are new businesses and it will look a lot different even two years from now. The town continues to improve which is encouraging.”Photo by Tina ColellaSea Bright Rising raised over $1.3 million that was used to help 300 families and 18 businesses in the town. “Sea Bright Rising had a very big part in getting a lot of people back to their homes. Three years after sandy the organization has run its course and I would say that the mission is about 80 percent complete, maybe even a little higher,” said Wood.However, there is still work to be done in Sea Bright. “There are always things that need to be done,” said Ilene Winters, member of the board of directors of Sea Bright Rising. “There are some businesses that haven’t come back. There is also the issue that what is going to happen with the abandoned homes. There is a very large group of abandoned homes and they cannot stay vacant forever.”“At some point the town has to take some action on the abandoned properties. It is an eyesore and reflects poorly on the improvements that have been made. It takes time and money but should be addressed,” said Wood.But the beach clubs, many of which were destroyed, were back in full swing this summer, Tim McLoone’s Rumrunner is being rebuilt and a new restaurant Tommy’s is enjoying a great deal of popularity. The downtown area still shows some wear and tear but Donovan’s Reef was operating from the beach this summer and hopes to build a full service bar and restaurant by next season.Mayor Dina Long is pleased with the town’s recovery. “Three years after Sandy Sea Bright is doing better than many people thought we would, especially considering the damage Sea Bright sustained in Super Storm Sandy,” she said. “We’ve seen 75 percent of residents and businesses come back but we still have a significant amount of work to do as a borough. We need to rebuild our municipal facilities and to make our infrastructure more resilient for the future.”Sea Bright lost four municipal buildings in Sandy, which the town will begin to rebuild in 2016, the mayor said. The borough will also identify additional flood mitigation projects is seeking funding for.“I think we learned a number of lessons from Sandy the hard way about the risks associated with where we live and the fact that anything can happen and you need to be prepared,” Long stressed. “ We also learned a lot about ourselves individually and our ability to cope and deal with extraordinary circumstances.”Monmouth Beach“Our takeaway from Sandy is that we must build to the National Flood Insurance Program regulations,” said Susan Howard, mayor of Monmouth Beach. “Houses in the town that complied with those regulations were safe during Sandy. Our focus is to make sure that everything that is done to rebuild our town complies with those regulations and is built for the 500-year storm so that we will be safe in the case of future storms..”Photo by Tina ColellaHoward explained that Monmouth Beach is working towards ensuring the safety of businesses and homes in the area by lifting buildings above the FEMA minimum. “We are raising to the Advisory Base Flood Elevation plus 3 feet, so we are going to the FEMA minimum and adding 3 feet because we want to elevate to prepare for a 500-year storm. Any new construction that has occurred we built at a higher level” she explained.The Channel Club has been repaired and is fully operational. The former Sally Tee’s has been rebuilt and is flourishing as The Beach Tavern and the devastation that once had hold of the town has basically vanished with some exceptions.And the ever-popular Monmouth Beach Cultural Center is holding receptions and showcasing local art.last_img read more

SA’s hotels attract investors

first_img18 June 2007With South Africa’s tourism industry registering healthy growth and the 2010 Fifa World Cup still to come, it’s little wonder that local hospitality groups are attracting increasing attention from foreign investors.In the latest of a string of investments in the local industry, Leisurecorp has announced the purchase of the 170-hectare Pearl Valley Signature Golf Estate & Spa development in the Western Cape for an undisclosed amount.Leisurecorp is a division of Istithmar, the investment arm of Dubai World, and a partner in the consortium that bought out one of Africa’s prime properties, the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront in Cape Town, in September last year.‘Huge potential’Leisurecorp chief executive David Spencer told Business Report this week that the course designed by golfing great Jack Nicklaus would host the SA Open Championship later in the year and was regarded as one of the best in the country, with “huge potential” for further development.In May, Belgium-based Rezidor Hotel Group announced that it would open a hotel in Sandton, north of Johannesburg, in late 2008, featuring 256 rooms and 27 suites.The Radisson Sandton will be located in the heart of South Africa’s financial centre, in close proximity to the JSE, Sandton Convention Centre and Sandton City shopping mall and within easy distance of OR Tambo International Airport.“South Africa is an upcoming destination for business and leisure travellers,” Rezidor CEO Kurt Ritter said in a statement.“The government has prioritised tourism as a key economic sector, and international arrivals increase continuously – we are expecting new heights in 2010 when the country hosts the Fifa World Cup,” Ritter added.Four new Express by Holiday InnsAlso in May, UK-based InterContinental Hotel Group announced that they had entered into partnership with Cape Town-based ISO Leisure to develop four new Express by Holiday Inn hotels in South Africa.The four hotels will be situated in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Pretoria and Umhlanga outside Durban, and will be built between 2007 and 2009.InterContinental’s announcement was “indicative of our confidence in the country’s economic prospects and stability,” said InterContinental vice-president for Africa development, Ewan Cameron.In March, Australia-based Stella Group purchased Africa’s biggest hotel chain, Protea Hotels, from local private investors for Aus$255-million (about R1.48-billion).The acquisition gives the Stella Group access to more than 9 000 rooms in 126 hotels in 13 countries around Africa. Another 3 000 rooms will be added to Protea Hotels by the end of 2008/09.“As the leading independent hotel management group in Africa, Protea Hotels is an excellent acquisition for Stella Group, rounding out an important geographic region in the company’s international profile,” said Stella Group MD Rolf Krecklenberg.Up to eight new luxury hotelsAlso in March, Germany’s Arabella Hotel Holdings International and US-based Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide announced plans to build as many as eight luxury hotels in South Africa, with at least two expected to be operational in time for the 2010 World Cup.However, by far the largest foreign investment in SA’s hospitality industry to date occurred in September 2006, when Istithmar partnered with UK-based London and Regional Properties to buy the iconic Victoria & Alfred Waterfront in Cape Town for US$1-billion.The deal includes an additional $1-billion investment in further development of the Waterfront, including increasing the number of hotels there.Prior to that, in March 2006, Kuwait-based IFA Hotels & Resorts (IFAHR) listed two South African subsidiaries on the JSE. IFAHR South Africa owns Zimbali Lodge on KwaZulu-Natal’s north coast, and a 50% stake in the multi-million rand Zimbali Coastal Resort, which combines hotels, golf courses and luxury residences and leisure facilities.A 300-hectare extension to the resort, Zimbali Lakes, is due to be substantially complete in time for the 2010 Football World Cup.Record-breaking growthAccording to the latest official figures, South Africa’s foreign tourist arrivals grew by 14% in 2006, three times the global tourism growth rate of 4.5%.Tourism to South Africa has flourished since the fall of apartheid: while only 3-million foreign visitors visited the country in 1994, the number had more than doubled to 6.7-million by 2004, and increased to a record 8.4-million in 2006.According to the Department of Tourism, tourism’s contribution to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew from 4.6% in 1993 to 8.3% in 2006, and the government is looking to further increase its contribution to 12% of GDP by 2014.Hosting the Fifa 2010 World Cup, the largest sporting event in the world, will bring in tens of thousands of additional tourists not only to watch the matches, but also to be part of the celebratory atmosphere around the country.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Celebrate with the South Centers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For the last quarter-century, a small southern Ohio village has hosted a center with university scientists conducting world-class agricultural research, and area entrepreneurs have thrived thanks to guidance from the center’s expert marketing and development specialists.It was Oct. 1, 1991, when The Ohio State University South Centers first opened. Then known as the Piketon Research and Extension Center, the facility was designed to help Ohio State expand its land-grant mission of providing science-based outreach and engagement in the area.“Having the center here in southern Ohio brings ideas and opportunities to the local region,” said Tom Worley, who started at the center in 2000 and was named director in 2005. “And even though we focus on southern Ohio, many of our efforts have an impact across the state and the nation, as well as internationally.“That’s ultimately what the university does, bring new ideas and concepts and provide leadership to bring people together that can spawn even newer and different applications.”Take a wagon tourThe center will host an anniversary open house on Sept. 15, 5-8 p.m., with refreshments and in-depth walking and wagon tours to allow visitors to get a firsthand look at the operation, Worley said.Participants will be able to visit and talk with specialists working in:* Aquaculture. In addition to the fish ponds and hatchery, visitors to the aquaculture program will also be able to see the genetics lab. “We have worked to improve the genetics of yellow perch, bluegill and largemouth bass,” Worley said. “It’s state-of-the-art genetic work.”* Specialty crops. The center is home to research trials on small fruits such as blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries, as well as Chinese goji berries, elderberries and chokeberries. And, while adult beverages aren’t on the menu, visitors will be able to learn about the center’s research on wine grape varieties and hops and malting barley production. The center is also home to the university’s pumpkin research trials, and is home base for its study of high tunnels, or hoop houses, for extending Ohio’s growing season for specialty crops. For example, one project is currently examining high tunnels and other production methods to increase strawberry production from the traditional four-week harvest season in June to a four-month production system.* Soil, Water and Bioenergy. This team’s focus is on agricultural practices that sustain soil and water resources and are economical for growers.“We are conducting studies related to the movement of water through the soil profile and we’re testing for the presence of fertilizers and pesticides,” Worley said. “Visitors will be able to see the sump houses, which are like a small cellar, to see how we collect the samples from the groundwater.” The team is also working with a Japanese company on water- and nutrient-saving technology in growing corn and soybeans.“It’s like putting plants on life support,” Worley said. “We’re using a hoop house to create desert-like conditions for the study, and supplying all the water and nutrients the crops need through a tube. It’s cutting-edge research.”The team also studies ways to improve soil health and is wrapping up a study on perennial grasses such as miscanthus, big blue stem and switchgrass that could be grown on marginal land for bioenergy purposes.* Business. The center’s business programs include a Small Business Development Center and a business incubator, the 27,000-square-foot Endeavor Center, which currently houses 18 different businesses that have ongoing activities throughout southern Ohio, Worley said.Talking business“Visitors will be able to meet our business development specialists and talk with them about the assistance we provide in terms of business planning, market analysis and management issues for small business startups and expansion,” he said.Also on hand will be specialists with the center’s Ohio Cooperative Development Center and Ohio Direct Marketing program.Before the open house, the center will host a lunch for invited guests, primarily longtime supporters of the center, Worley said.During that program, Worley will recognized four employees who have been with the center since its opening: Marsha Amlin, assistant to the director and fiscal officer; Wayne Lewis, farm and research field operations manager; Dean Rapp, aquaculture research assistant; and Duane Rigsby, technology coordinator.For more information about the open house, contact Charissa Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132, or gardner.1148@osu.edu.last_img read more

Headless body of woman found near Kamakhya temple

first_imgThe headless body of a woman was recovered near the Kamakhya temple in Guwahati on Wednesday evening. Police are not ruling out the possibility of a human sacrifice. The body was recovered on the stairs leading to the Jai Durga temple, one of many places of worship scattered around Kamakhya temple on the Nilachal Hills.The human sacrifice theory was triggered by flowers, burnt incense sticks and other items used for tantra practices found near the body.“We are searching for the decapitated head with the help of a sniffer dog. It could be a case of human sacrifice since Kamakhya has had a history of such practice and is a prime place of congregation for tantra practitioners,” a police officer said.“But we cannot jump to conclusions as the woman could have been murdered elsewhere and her body dumped here to make it look like a sacrifice. We can be sure after an autopsy,” he said.The four-day long Ambubachi mela, beginning from June 22, is an annual fair marking the symbolic menstruation of Goddess Kamakhya.Books by Lakshminath Bezbaroa and other Assamese writers say human sacrifice was a common practice at Kamakhya. This ritual was stopped during the British rule, but some priests carried on sacrificing dummies for some time.last_img read more

Videos: Louisville Owned SportsCenter’s Top 10 Plays After Dominating Syracuse

first_imgDonovan Mitchell throws down dunk against Syracuse..Twitter/@theACCDNMidway through the second half of Wednesday night’s 72-58 home win over Syracuse, the Louisville Cardinals were doing whatever they wanted on offense. The dominant display was heavily featured on SportsCenter this morning, where the Cardinals had three of the Top 10 plays of the day.First up, at No. 7, this beautiful behind-the-back assist by Chinanu Onuaku.Nanu droppin’ dimes. pic.twitter.com/7MFnoY0qRb— LouisvilleSportsLive (@LvilleSprtsLive) February 18, 2016Next, at No. 4, another Onuaku assist—this time to Jaylen Johnson for a powerful alley-oop.It’s like Louisville found a “if you make the other team cry they have to let you play in the tournament” loophole pic.twitter.com/m4kMWmXva4— Mike Rutherford (@CardChronicle) February 18, 2016And finally, Louisville took home the top play, with this ferocious alley-oop from Damion Lee to Donovan Mitchell.If you look close enough, you can see a smile on Donovan Mitchell’s face as he slams this one home for @GoCards!https://t.co/xlTSYEXZ08— ACC Digital Network (@theACCDN) February 18, 2016That one was just mean. Mitchell liked it so much, he made it the header photo for his Twitter profile. donovan mitchell twitterIt’s been a rough few weeks for the Cardinals. Last night’s big win had to be pretty cathartic.last_img read more

Halifax tech incubator Volta Labs triples in size touts track record

first_imgHALIFAX – A Halifax tech incubator is tripling in size to become what the province says will be one of Canada’s largest technology hubs.Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil announced $2.25 million in funding Tuesday for Volta Labs over three years.“This funding will give more entrepreneurs in Nova Scotia the support they need to start great companies,” McNeil said. “It will also help our vibrant startup community continue to grow.”Volta’s space in a downtown office building is expanding to 60,000 square feet, from 20,000, allowing more space for startups, as well as an event space.Volta Labs, established in 2013, says more than 50 early stage companies have worked out of its Maritime Centre space, and 70 per cent of its companies are still in business.It says those companies have raised more than $50 million in equity funding and currently employ more than 290 full-time staff.Jesse Rodgers, CEO of Volta Labs, said in a statement the money allows it “to be the place where high-potential founders come together, learn from each other, and build globally competitive companies.”“This investment will help us support entrepreneurs and create a home for the technology community in Halifax,” he said. “This is key to building Halifax’s innovation district.”Since launching in 2013, Volta has received more than $6 million in funding, including $3.1 million from the province and another $2.9 million from the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency.Volta offers various programs and support to resident startups, such as sales and marketing training, design resources and one-on-one sessions with in-house experts in finance, legal, public relations and other areas.The tech incubator also hosts retreats to help entrepreneurs “get away from it all to recharge and provide support to each other,” according to the website.last_img read more

3 held for duping people on pretext of giving money through credit

first_imgNEW DELHI: Delhi Police has busted a gang which lured men into swapping their credit cards in return of 2 percent commission. Three cheats Gopal Das, Surender Kumar Arora and Gopinder has been arrested by Delhi Police. They were duping public providing money by credit cards swapping and recovered Credit Card Swapping Machines (POS Machines), laptop, mobile phones, SIM cards and forged documents related with a different company, linked bank account details etc, on their instance. The complainant saw an advertisement pasted on the road side about swapping of credit cards on a 2% commission basis along with a mobile number. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesHe needed money for his family use and to meet the educational expenses of his children. He made a call and a youngster came to him and swapped his credit card for Rs 2,00,000 and told him that he would get his amount through his account after deducting 3% commission and left the place without giving any cash to him. He later realised he was cheated. The police arrested the three accused on 5 May. “Surender convinced his elder brother Gopal and Bhanja Gopinder for this conspiracy and used them to open bank accounts, forged company and to arrange mobile SIM cards. Apart from that, he purchased 9-11, POS Machines from an authorised Company. He transfers the amount to the forged company’s account and transfer to multiple accounts,” said DCP Madhur Verma.last_img read more