New TCI Police sworn in assigned to CID Marine and Tactical

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, August 15, 2017 – Providenciales – Thirteen new Police officers are sworn in now and the new squad will join the Criminal Investigations Department, #CID; Tactical Unit and Marine Branch.    The men and women, hailing from Jamaica and the Philippines are trained and ready for active duty.David Barnett, Marlon Dawkins, Christopher Morrison, Robert McClean, Horace Chung, Renaldo Burke, Monique Brandford, Rory Burke, Dexter Anthony, Marlon Morse, Andrea Lewis and Carl Wynters; and from the Philippines Daphney Alcima were officially sworn in by Commissioner James Smith as Constables.A media release from the Police Force explained, the officers are presently undergoing orientation and an introduction session to the Force’s Code of Conduct.#MagneticMediaNews Related Items:#CID, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Lightning kills 7 in 5 dists

first_imgFile photo of LightningSeven people were killed and 10 others injured in separate lightning strikes in five districts on Thursday, reports UNB.The five districts are Habiganj, Meherpur, Cumilla, Satkhira and Netrakona.In Habiganj, a farmer and a schoolgirl were killed when thunder bolts hit them in separate places in Baniachong upazila.The deceased were identified as Tarin, 15, daughter of Jahir Miah and a class IX student of Sujatpur High School and farmer Mizanur Rahman, residents of Sotomukha village in Sujatpur union.Tarin’s father Jahir Miah said a thunderbolt hit Tarin while working at the court yard of their house and she died on the spot.Besides, Mizanur was killed in lightning while he was cutting paddy at Daulatpur haor.In Meherpur, Helu Zoarder, 55, son of Nabin Zoarder of Mohammadpur village, was killed as a lightning struck him while he was working at the field of the village in Gangi upazila around 11:00am.Besides, six people were injured in lightning strikes at Mohammadpur, Kasba and Motmura villages of the upazila.In Cumilla, Md Ishak Miah, 55, a former union parishad member, was killed after being hit by a lightning at Baira village in Nangolkot upazila.The incident took place while cleaning hyacinth from his pond at noon.In Satkhira, a thunderbolt hit Ashraf Hossain, 28, son of late Abdul Majid of Ghola village in Shyamnagar upazila, while working at his fish enclosure, leaving him dead on the spot.In another incident, Aminur Rahman, 16, son of Abdus Sattar of Gangati village, was killed and two other teenage boys were injured as a streak of lightning hit him while he was sitting at the veranda of a mosque after saying zohr prayers.The injured are Mizanur Rahman, 15 and Akhterul Islam, 17.In Netrakona, Mitu Akhter, 12, daughter of Habibur Rahman, was killed and her grandmother Safura Begum and younger brother Rakib Hossain, 8, were injured in a lightning strike at Atithpur village in Barhatta upazila.last_img read more

Nepal minister among 7 dead in chopper crash

first_imgNepal’s tourism minister Rabindra Adhikari was among seven people killed Wednesday when a helicopter crashed in the country’s hilly east, officials said.Rescue workers retrieved the bodies of Adhikari, 49, the pilot and five other passengers from a hillside in Taplejung district where the Air Dynasty chopper went down.”The respected minister’s body has been identified,” Ram Krishna Subedi, the spokesman for the ministry of home affairs, said in a press conference.Subedi said two army helicopters had been dispatched to bring the bodies back to the capital Kathmandu.It is unclear why the helicopter crashed.A search and rescue team was deployed to the area after locals alerted authorities to flames and smoke rising from a hillside.”The helicopter is in pieces, and scattered all over,” said Suraj Bhattarai, a witness who saw the debris.The bodies of the others killed in the crash have not yet been identified.The minister was on a trip to scope out a possible location for a new airport in the region.It is just the latest aviation accident to plague Nepal, an impoverished Himalayan nation with a poor air safety record.Nepal has some of the world’s most remote and tricky runways, flanked by snow-capped peaks with approaches that pose a challenge for even accomplished pilots.The country has a booming private helicopter industry, flying tourists and goods to remote corners of the Himalayan nation where road access is limited or non-existent.In September last year, six people including a Japanese tourist was killed when a helicopter crashed.A US-Bangla Airways plane crashed near the capital’s airport in March, killing 51 people.Nepal-based airlines are banned from flying in European Union airspace.Its poor air safety record is largely blamed on inadequate maintenance and sub-standard management.last_img read more

Maxwells demons may drive some biological systems

first_imgConventionally, the switching mechanism was thought to operate in equilibrium, where the switch changes between clockwise and counterclockwise motor rotations in a balanced way. An earlier experiment showed that the time interval a flagllear motor spends in a given state (either clockwise or counterclockwise) follows a peaked distribution. Based on Tu’s work, this peaked interval time distribution indicates that the switch operates out of equilibrium. In order to achieve this fast and accurate switching, the switch must be extremely sensitive to the CheY-P concentration. In the non-equilibrium model, Tu shows that this high sensitivity can be explained by the presence of two Maxwell’s demons, which act as the switch’s sensors for the CheY-P. “The easiest way to explain the work of these two Maxwell’s demons is that they are two coincidence counters,” he said. “Each switch can have up to 34 CheY-P regulators bind to it. One of the demons will count the number of bound CheY-P, and if the number is greater than some threshold, say 22, it will switch the motor from CCW to CW; another demon works the opposite way with a low threshold, say 12. If the number of CheY-P bound is less than 12, this demon will switch the motor from CW to CCW.”These “demons” consume energy to do their work, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The more energy the demons use, the more sensitive the switch is. Tu determined the exact amount of energy used per switch cycle, and discovered that it is roughly equal to the work done by one or two protons moving through the membrane near the flagellar motor. Based on this finding, he predicts that the switch may be powered by protons passing through the membrane. This possibility would agree with earlier observations that the average switching frequency depends on the proton flux.As Tu explains, viewing the flagellar motor switch in the framework of a non-equilibrium model could help scientists understand the switching mechanism as an integrated part of the motor system. In biology, many systems operate out of equilibrium, and Tu’s model could help scientists detect interesting non-equilibrium effects. Besides the flagellar motor, he predicts that a similar non-equilibrium mechanism, driven by Maxwell’s demons, could be responsible for a variety of other cellular processes.More information: Tu, Yuhai. “The nonequilibrium mechanism for ultrasensitivity in a biological switch: Sensing by Maxwell’s demons.” PNAS, August 19, 2008, vol. 105, no. 33, 11737-11741.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — According to the second law of thermodynamics, entropy always increases. For example, two bodies of different temperatures, when brought into contact, will eventually mix together to result in a uniform temperature. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. But, as the physicist James Clerk Maxwell famously suggested in 1871, what would happen if a theoretical demon could stand at a doorway between the two bodies, and only allow high-temperature particles to pass through one way, and only low-temperature particles to pass through the other? The tiny doorman would prevent the two temperatures from mixing, and theoretically prevent entropy. Of course, the demon would use energy to do this job, thus creating entropy itself, and so the second law would not be violated.While Maxwell’s demon was originally considered a thought experiment, similar mechanisms have been discovered for various applications. One example is a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube, which is a pneumatic device that separates hot and cold air by spinning hot and cold molecules in different directions.Now, a recent study shows that a similar mechanism may drive a motor switch in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and may be responsible for many other signaling systems in biology. Researcher Yuhai Tu at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, explains how E. coli’s Maxwell’s demons work in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“There are two related contributions made in this paper,” Tu told PhysOrg.com. “First, a general non-equilibrium mechanism for making a highly sensitive switch (i.e., how Maxwell’s demons can be used to increase sensitivity). Second, a general result on dwell-time statistics (how long a system should stay in a given state before it switches to other states). This result can be used as a diagnostic tool to detect the existence of these demons (or non-equilibrium effects) in an unknown system.”The bacterium contains flagellar motors that drive its motion. A flagellar motor has a switch (a shift gear) whose job is to sense the concentration of a regulator called CheY-P, and then control the rotational direction of the motor to be either clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW), accordingly. “The purpose of the CW and CCW switch is to control the motion of the cell,” Tu said. “The CheY-P level is the signal (red/yellow/green light) which affects the switch (stop/slow/move). In a very loose sense, CCW results in movement and CW results in switching direction. The bacterium cell needs to control these two types of motions to navigate towards (away from) favorable (toxic) environments.” Video games are a ‘great equalizer’ for people with disabilities Citation: Maxwell’s demons may drive some biological systems (2008, September 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-maxwell-demons-biological.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

A manmade material that mimics the curling of the mimosa leaflet

first_img Play Static self-assembling properties of circular-shaped Janus bilayer demonstrating artificial tropism in response to a microdroplet. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen In addition to providing a roadmap for the development of a new class of self-organizing materials, the team believes their material could be used in a wide variety of applications, ranging from sensors built into clothes (which could self-activate when exposed to sweat) to sensors made for responding to other bodily fluids. It might even prove suitable for harvesting water from fog or for creating micro-robotic devices programmed by shape. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Researchers create tiny pump that provides continuous and spontaneous antigravity water delivery (Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from the Australian National University and City University of Hong Kong has created a material that is capable of mimicking the action of a mimosa leaflet when it is touched. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their material and how it reacts when a drop of liquid is deposited onto its surface. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2016 Phys.org Explore furthercenter_img More information: W. S. Y. Wong et al. Mimosa Origami: A nanostructure-enabled directional self-organization regime of materials, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600417AbstractOne of the innate fundamentals of living systems is their ability to respond toward distinct stimuli by various self-organization behaviors. Despite extensive progress, the engineering of spontaneous motion in man-made inorganic materials still lacks the directionality and scale observed in nature. We report the directional self-organization of soft materials into three-dimensional geometries by the rapid propagation of a folding stimulus along a predetermined path. We engineer a unique Janus bilayer architecture with superior chemical and mechanical properties that enables the efficient transformation of surface energy into directional kinetic and elastic energies. This Janus bilayer can respond to pinpoint water stimuli by a rapid, several-centimeters-long self-assembly that is reminiscent of the Mimosa pudica’s leaflet folding. The Janus bilayers also shuttle water at flow rates up to two orders of magnitude higher than traditional wicking-based devices, reaching velocities of 8 cm/s and flow rates of 4.7 μl/s. This self-organization regime enables the ease of fabricating curved, bent, and split flexible channels with lengths greater than 10 cm, demonstrating immense potential for microfluidics, biosensors, and water purification applications.Press release Citation: A man-made material that mimics the curling of the mimosa leaflet (2016, June 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-man-made-material-mimics-mimosa-leaflet.html Play Mimosa Origami assembly of the Janus bilayer strips performing double right-angle turns on a superhydrophobic PS-PDMS substrate. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 Play Modular microfluidics: Janus-based Mimosa Origami strips with double-ended bulbs on a superhydrophobic PS-PDMS substrate showing in-channel droplet mixing. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 Journal information: Science Advances As the researchers note, nature is filled with examples of living systems that react to stimuli by engaging in self-organization behaviors. One such example is the fern-like mimosa plant, it has multiple leaflets along individual twigs that are each independently sensitive to touch—such stimuli (such as children over the generations having some fun with their friends) causes the leaflet to curl up into a hollow tube shape resembling a very small straw. Developing materials with similar characteristics is highly desirable because it allows for creating unique products, such as very low power sensors.In this new effort, the researchers created the new material by fashioning stacks of multi-function layers of a Janus nanoparticle based material (offering opposite hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties) to a bottom layer made of polyvinyl chloride microfibers. The result was a thin length of flat white material with a larger round formation at one end. When a liquid was dropped onto the round formation, the liquid was pushed, through self-action, by the material all the way to the other end—as it was pushed, the material curled from one end to the other, resulting in what looked like an ordinary straw. The researchers report that the action was fast, taking just 33 milliseconds to get started. They note also that the self-action was reversible as well—as the material dried, it flattened. Play Modular microfluidics: Janus-based Mimosa Origami strips at a T-junction, showcasing double-ended split for potential in multichannel capabilities. Credit: Wong et al. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1600417 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more