Richard Sherman Cites Race in DeSean Jacksons Release by

For Sports Illustrated’s Monday Morning Quarterback, Seattle Seahawks All-Pro cornerback Richard Sherman wrote about how race played a role in DeSean Jackson’s release by the Philadelphia Eagles and his relationship with his childhood friend. The Eagles cut the Pro Bowl receiver amid rumors he had connections with an L.A. gang. Jackson vehemently denied the allegations and eventually signed a three-year, $24-million contract with with the Washington Redskins.I’m not going to tell you that DeSean Jackson isn’t in a gang, because I can’t say unequivocally that he isn’t. I can’t tell you whether his friends have done the things police have accused them of doing, because I wasn’t there. I can’t tell you what DeSean does with his time, because we play football on opposite ends of the country. I can only tell you that I believe him to be a good person, and if you think, say or write otherwise without knowing the man, you’re in the wrong.And if it’s true the Eagles terminated his contract in part because they grew afraid of his alleged “gang ties,” then they did something worse. [Editor’s note: Jackson has agreed to terms with the Redskins.]I look at those words—gang ties—and I think about all the players I’ve met in the NFL and all of us who come from inner-city neighborhoods like mine in Los Angeles, and I wonder how many of us could honestly say we’re not friends with guys doing the wrong things.I can’t.I grew up in Watts, and I played baseball with DeSean in elementary school on a team coached by his father near Inglewood. His father, Bill, picked me up from elementary school 30 minutes away from his home for practice and games because my parents both worked and didn’t finish until later, and I wanted to play baseball with some childhood friends. Bill was a great coach, and a great man. He died of pancreatic cancer in 2009, the summer after his son’s rookie season. DeSean and I didn’t hang out then like we did as kids.Those men with DeSean in the social pictures and the police reports weren’t his closest friends in childhood, but when his father died and few people were there for him, they were there. When a tragic event like that happens, the people who are around are the people who are around, and they were there for him.Was DeSean supposed to then say, “Thanks guys, but now that I’m a millionaire, please leave me alone”? Even if he wanted to, he wouldn’t have. In desperate times for people who come from desperate communities, your friends become your family. I wouldn’t expect DeSean to “distance himself” from anybody, as so many people suggest pro athletes ought to do despite having no understanding of what that means. Going to college and playing in the NFL creates a natural distance, but we can’t push people away just because they’re not as successful as us. I can’t change who I grew up with, but what I can do is try to educate them on the right way of doing things, help them when they need it, and try to keep them out of trouble.There is, of course, a tipping point. There have been times when I realized that someone can’t be helped, because they continue doing the wrong things. Typically, the only time I cut someone off is when they’re in jail, because I can’t help them there.And if they’re accused of a crime, as DeSean’s friends have been, should that reflect poorly on me? Consider that for every several guys I try to help who end up dead or in jail, there’s another person I was able to rescue from a similar end. Should I give up on everybody out of fear of being dirtied by the media?Sorry, but I was born in this dirt.NFL teams understand that. The Seattle Seahawks get it. The Philadelphia Eagles apparently do not.This offseason they re-signed a player who was caught on video screaming, “I will fight every n—– here.” He was representing the Philadelphia Eagles when he said it, because, of course, everything we do is reflective of the organization. But what did they do to Riley Cooper, who, if he’s not a racist, at least has “ties” to racist activity? They fined him and sent him to counseling. No suspension necessary for Cooper and no punishment from the NFL, despite its new interest in policing our use of the N-word on the field. Riley instead got a few days off from training camp and a nice contract in the offseason, too.Commit certain crimes in this league and be a certain color, and you get help, not scorn. Look at the way many in the media wrote about Jim Irsay after his DUI arrest. Nobody suggested the Colts owner had “ties” to drug trafficking, even though he was caught driving with controlled substances (prescription pills) and $29,000 in cash to do who-knows-what with. Instead, poor millionaire Mr. Irsay needs help, some wrote.But DeSean Jackson is the menace, right? He’s just as bad as those guys he parties with because he threw up a Crip sign in a picture and he owns a gangsta rap record label. If only all record-label owners were held to this standard, somebody might realize that Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg weren’t the bosses behind NWA. Jim Irsay lookalikes in suits were.But go ahead and judge DeSean for the company he keeps. While you’re at it, judge me, too, because I still live in Los Angeles, and my family does, too. We didn’t run from where we grew up. We aren’t afraid to be associated with the people who came up with us. We brought some of our money back and started charities and tried to help out a few guys who were with us when we were nobodies.I won’t apologize for that, and I suspect neither will DeSean when he’s back on the field doing what he’s always done: grinding through adversity. read more

Homelessness in San Diego

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Homelessness FacebookTwitter January 9, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Homelessness in San Diego KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsAlthough many steps have been taken to try and improve the homeless issue in San Diego, it continues to be a topic of concern.KUSI was joined by founder of Homelessness News San Diego, Michael McConnell, with more on the problem the city is facing. Posted: January 9, 2018last_img read more

The Wilmington Insider For April 18 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Wednesday, April 18, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Partly sunny, with a high near 53. West wind around 9 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.In The Community: The Aleppo Shriners Circus returns to the Shriners Auditorium (99 Fordham Road) during April school vacation week. The circus will run from Wednesday, April 18 to Sunday, April 22:Wednesday, April 18: 2pm & 7pmThursday, April 219: 2pm & 7pmFriday, April 20: 10am, 2pm, & 7pmSaturday, April 21: 10am, 2pm, & 7pmSunday, April 22: 1pm & 5pmTickets cost $10.  The Box Office opens on April 9. Call 1-800-700-0013 to purchase tickets.  Parking is free. Proceeds from the carnival will benefit the Auditorium. Join the Facebook event HERE.In The Community: The Wilmington Police Department will NOT be offering its weekly safety seat installs at the Wilmington Public Safety Building today.In The Community: The Friends of the Wilmington Memorial Library’s Book Store Next Door (183 Middlesex Avenue) is open from 10am to 4pm. All books are $2 or less!  Every penny of every sale benefits the Wilmington Memorial Library. Learn more HERE.Leaves/Brush Drop Off: The Wilmington Yardwaste Center on Old Main Street will be open today from 8am to 2pm for the drop-off of leaves and brush. Residents will need to purchase a punch-card for $15 in order to enter the yardwaste center. Punch-cards will be available for purchase through the Collector’s Office at Town Hall and will allow up to 5 vehicle trips to the yardwaste center per card. NO GRASS CLIPPINGS OR STUMPS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Commercial vehicles will not be allowed. Make sure to bring photo identification to show you are a Wilmington resident.At The Library: Tech Help Drop-In at 2pm. Beyond The Fairy Tale: Interactive Theatre Workshop for Kids at 3pm. [Learn more HERE.]At The Senior Center: Podiatrist at 9:30am. SBF Exercise at 9:45am. Special Exercise at 11am. Cards at 1pm. Fun Singers at 3pm. [Learn more HERE.]Wilmington Public Schools: NO SCHOOL this week due to April vacation.Go Wildcats!: 4 Wilmington High teams are in action today. See the schedule HERE.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedThe Wilmington Insider For April 21, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For April 20, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For April 22, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Airports alerted over return of Bangladeshi militants from Syria

first_imgIslamic StateThe Bangladeshi nationals, who went to Syria to fight for Islamic State (IS), may now return home as the militant group is about to be uprooted from the pockets in the civil war-torn Middle East country.In such a context, alerts have been issued at all airports, according to officials at Counter Terrorism and Transnational Crime (CTTC) unit of the police.”We guess, the Bangladeshis who went to Syria have planned to return home. Airports have been asked to remain alert about any possible situation,” CTTC unit chief Monirul Islam told Prothom Alo.He said airports have been provided with necessary information along with suspected militants’ photos so that they cannot avoid arrest and officials have been asked to ensure that.The CTTC unit chief said the militant suspects will require passports and travel documents to enter Bangladesh.However, he added, it is assumed that they lost passports immediately after joining the IS. In that case, they can contact Bangladesh embassy in Turkey and officials there have also been asked to take necessary steps.The police official could not confirm identity of those who are actually trying to return.The last stronghold of IS in Syria was reportedly lost on Saturday.Around 800 foreign militants were detained by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). The US has called for their trial in their respective home countries.The police officials said the government of Bangladesh has no intention to bring such militants back and try them.Sources in the law enforcement said they have confirmed that two Bangladeshi passport holders — Ibrahim Hasan Khan and his brother Zunayed Hasan Khan want to return. Their family lived in Saudi Arabia for long although these two brothers went to Syria via Dhaka. Before leaving Bangladesh, they lived in a house in Bashundhara residential area.It is learnt that physician Rokonuddin, who went to Syria along with his family, has been trying to return, officials said.Dhaka Shisu Hospital physician Rokonuddin along with his wife Naima Akhtar, daughter Ramita Rokon and Rewana Rokon and son-in-law Sad Kayes left the country to join the IS.According to the law enforcement agencies, a total of 40 Bangladeshi passport holders left the country to join the IS. It is believed that half of them died.Efforts are on to find out whereabouts of the rest, likely to be around 20 millitants.An official at the CTTC unit said some people possessing Bangladeshi passports may join the IS from other countries. At least one of such person has been detected. There are four to five Bangladeshis in Baghouz in eastern Syria where IS was defeated on Saturday. However, their fates are yet to be known.Kurdish news agency ANHA published a report on detainees captured by SDF in Syria last month. It quoted Bangladeshi physician Arafat Rahman Tushar who went to Syria from Bangladesh.”The Caliphate movement has come to an end. There is no trace of the caliph for whose call we went to Syria,” ANHA quoted Tushar as saying.Ishfaq Ilahi Chowdhury, a retired air commodore, said those, who went to Syria, denied identity of their state and showed allegiance to the IS. “They should not be brought back under any circumstance,” he said adding that they would not be allowed to be regrouped.Ilahi said it is true that IS was defeated in Syria, but there are some videos posted on social media where their activists and supporters are threatening to regroup.*This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Rabiul Islamlast_img read more

A Minimum 6M Settlement Disclosed in Baltimore Public Housing SexforRepairs Lawsuit

first_imgBALTIMORE (AP) — The lawyer representing women who said maintenance workers demanded sex from them in exchange for basic repairs at public housing units in Baltimore says a settlement of at least $6 million has been reached.Cary J. Hansel said at a news conference Friday that all victims of sexual harassment in public housing will be eligible for the settlement. Hansel said the settlement amount will range from $6 million to $7.95 million, depending on how many join the lawsuit.The lawsuit included accounts by women who alleged they had been victimized by handymen whose neglect resulted in squalid conditions including leaks, insect infestations and dangerous mold growth.Housing Authority Commissioner Paul T. Graziano has said the agency will make sure this doesn’t happen again.last_img read more