Palumbo and Walczak Named MVC Doubles Team of the Week for Second Time

first_imgST. LOUIS – Carmen Palumbo (McLean, Va.) and Daria Walczak (Lodz, Poland) of the Drake University women’s tennis team are the Missouri Valley Conference Doubles Team of the Week, the MVC office announced Tuesday, April 9. This is the second time this season the pair are the MVC’s top doubles team after previously winning it on Feb. 19. Drake hosts its final home match Saturday against Valparaiso. First serve at the Roger Knapp Tennis Center is scheduled for 11 a.m. Print Friendly Version Last week, Palumbo and Walczak went 2-0 and helped Drake split its first two MVC matches. They claimed a 7-5 win over Reghan Lynch/Claudia Toledo of UNI in the No. 1 match in a 6-1 victory over the Panthers. They followed that with a 6-3 win over Alye Darter/Mara Presot of Missouri State in the No. 2 match in a close 4-3 defeat to the Bears. The perfect week improved the pair’s record to 11-7 together.last_img read more

2010 catalyst for Zimbabwe?

first_imgt23 July 2009One could be forgiven for still feeling apprehensive about the situation in Zimbabwe.For many years, Africa and the rest of the world has watched its political and economic meltdown, which spilled over into neighbouring states, casting a pall over much of the sub-continent’s progress and, of course, South Africa’s 2010 World Cup preparations. Nevertheless, by securing the rights to host the quadrennial showpiece of international soccer, South Africa has become a beacon of hope for Zimbabwe and the rest of the continent.And over the past few months, there have been strong indications that the tide has turned and that Zimbabwe is now gearing itself to play a pivotal role in the 2010 tournament.For starters, a government of national unity has been formed, a move which has stabilised the economy, curbed post-election violence and given the country’s tourism industry a major boost.With concerns being raised over accommodation shortages in South Africa, Zimbabwe is now being promoted as a popular alternative.Victoria Falls, home to the world’s largest waterfall, is re-establishing itself as a luxury and adventure travel destination ahead of the tournament, with plans to attract thousands of tourists.Several senior Fifa officials are visiting Zimbabwe this week to assess the situation, and Fifa chief Sepp Blatter has reportedly indicated that he plans to visit before the tournament.Despite the political uncertainty, global football’s governing body has invested heavily in Africa’s former breadbasket. It has funded the installation of an artificial turf in the capital’s Rufaro Stadium, giving the ageing facility a new lease of life.Could 2010 prove to be the catalyst marking Zimbabwe’s full return to the international fold?Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

Celebrate with the South Centers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For the last quarter-century, a small southern Ohio village has hosted a center with university scientists conducting world-class agricultural research, and area entrepreneurs have thrived thanks to guidance from the center’s expert marketing and development specialists.It was Oct. 1, 1991, when The Ohio State University South Centers first opened. Then known as the Piketon Research and Extension Center, the facility was designed to help Ohio State expand its land-grant mission of providing science-based outreach and engagement in the area.“Having the center here in southern Ohio brings ideas and opportunities to the local region,” said Tom Worley, who started at the center in 2000 and was named director in 2005. “And even though we focus on southern Ohio, many of our efforts have an impact across the state and the nation, as well as internationally.“That’s ultimately what the university does, bring new ideas and concepts and provide leadership to bring people together that can spawn even newer and different applications.”Take a wagon tourThe center will host an anniversary open house on Sept. 15, 5-8 p.m., with refreshments and in-depth walking and wagon tours to allow visitors to get a firsthand look at the operation, Worley said.Participants will be able to visit and talk with specialists working in:* Aquaculture. In addition to the fish ponds and hatchery, visitors to the aquaculture program will also be able to see the genetics lab. “We have worked to improve the genetics of yellow perch, bluegill and largemouth bass,” Worley said. “It’s state-of-the-art genetic work.”* Specialty crops. The center is home to research trials on small fruits such as blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries, as well as Chinese goji berries, elderberries and chokeberries. And, while adult beverages aren’t on the menu, visitors will be able to learn about the center’s research on wine grape varieties and hops and malting barley production. The center is also home to the university’s pumpkin research trials, and is home base for its study of high tunnels, or hoop houses, for extending Ohio’s growing season for specialty crops. For example, one project is currently examining high tunnels and other production methods to increase strawberry production from the traditional four-week harvest season in June to a four-month production system.* Soil, Water and Bioenergy. This team’s focus is on agricultural practices that sustain soil and water resources and are economical for growers.“We are conducting studies related to the movement of water through the soil profile and we’re testing for the presence of fertilizers and pesticides,” Worley said. “Visitors will be able to see the sump houses, which are like a small cellar, to see how we collect the samples from the groundwater.” The team is also working with a Japanese company on water- and nutrient-saving technology in growing corn and soybeans.“It’s like putting plants on life support,” Worley said. “We’re using a hoop house to create desert-like conditions for the study, and supplying all the water and nutrients the crops need through a tube. It’s cutting-edge research.”The team also studies ways to improve soil health and is wrapping up a study on perennial grasses such as miscanthus, big blue stem and switchgrass that could be grown on marginal land for bioenergy purposes.* Business. The center’s business programs include a Small Business Development Center and a business incubator, the 27,000-square-foot Endeavor Center, which currently houses 18 different businesses that have ongoing activities throughout southern Ohio, Worley said.Talking business“Visitors will be able to meet our business development specialists and talk with them about the assistance we provide in terms of business planning, market analysis and management issues for small business startups and expansion,” he said.Also on hand will be specialists with the center’s Ohio Cooperative Development Center and Ohio Direct Marketing program.Before the open house, the center will host a lunch for invited guests, primarily longtime supporters of the center, Worley said.During that program, Worley will recognized four employees who have been with the center since its opening: Marsha Amlin, assistant to the director and fiscal officer; Wayne Lewis, farm and research field operations manager; Dean Rapp, aquaculture research assistant; and Duane Rigsby, technology coordinator.For more information about the open house, contact Charissa Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132, or gardner.1148@osu.edu.last_img read more

Amazon Kindle Now Lets You Loan Your E-Books (Sorta)

first_imgCurrently, sharing can only be administered via the Amazon website, not within apps or on the Kindle itself. For (certain) books you’ve downloaded, you’ll find the option under “Manage Your Kindle.” The recipient of your book needn’t own a Kindle, and you’ll just need their email address in order to make the loan. They’ve got to crack the book open…. errrr, click on the link and accept the download… within 7 days, and they have 14 days total, of course, in order to read and “return” it. Related Posts One of the features that the Barnes & Noble Nook has had that the Amazon Kindle lacked is the ability to lend e-books. No more. You can now lend your Kindle books, as the feature, first reported back in October, has gone live today. But before you get too excited about the ability to share your digital library, there are a number of key restrictions.Only certain books can be loaned. According to Amazon, “it is up to the publisher or rights holder to determine which titles are eligible for lending.” (None of the books I have downloaded are available to lend, for what it’s worth.) Furthermore, while the book is on loan, the owner can’t access it. Lending can only be initiated by U.S. customers, and recipients won’t have access to certain books in certain countries.And arguably the most frustrating restriction: you can only lend a book once.The loan lasts 14 days, which I suppose isn’t totally unreasonable. And hey, at least you’re guaranteed to get the book back, right? Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#E-Books#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… audrey watterslast_img read more

The Art of Lens Whacking

first_imgLens whacking can elevate your shot in seemingly magical ways, from adding light leaks to creating a vintage look. Here’s everything you need to know about the technique.Top Image via UglyMcGregorLens whacking. It sounds like something that will cost you a night in jail. However, it is indeed a very creative use of the camera and lens which can help produce a gorgeous in-camera effect which can never be replicated as organic in post.What Is Lens Whacking?All images are captured after the light has passed through the lens and hit the sensor (or film). The light passes through many elements within the lens that have been engineered in a very specific way. A 20mm has different elements than an 85mm. Nonetheless, the light passes through in an orderly fashion.Lens whacking is where you remove the lens and physically hold it in front of the sensor. Light then passes through both the lens and the gap between the lens and the camera body. This essentially causes a light leak.As you are partially pushing one part of the lens forward to let in the light, it also will cause a section of the image to fall out of focus, and, to some extent, produce a slight tilt-shift effect. This is entirely done by hand, and as a result of this, no two takes are going to look remotely the same — it’s wildly unpredictable, and as a result, it’s great fun.How To Do ItThe lens choice is the first important step to undertake. Lens whacking a 200mm, well, it’s not going to happen. Not successfully, anyway. Lenses that have a short focal length are ideal for lens whacking, as you want the focus window to be as wide as possible. If you were to use a lens such as an 85mm, you might find yourself trying to find the subject in the viewfinder more than perfecting the light leak. Older lenses with manual aperture and focus are preferred, as it can be quite a pain to have to keep reconnecting your lens to the camera if you wish to change the aperture.You want to set your lens to have the smallest aperture available to you. Again, this is to stop the extremity of your subject falling too much out of focus.Set up your framing, start recording, and then remove the lens from the camera. You only want your lens to be detached from the camera like the cover image above. If you open the gap too much, you’ll flood the sensor with light and wash out the image. (Although, that in itself can work very well for a creative transition.) The best method for lens whacking is not to keep the lens fully removed from the camera at all times, but to bring it in and out every so often. The shot can become very distracting if there’s a constant light-leak focus-loss throughout the entire shot.Image via SLR LoungeFor the best results, try removing your lens to the side where light is hitting the camera. You’ll have a much more powerful flare. Alternatively, if you find that the light leak is too strong, place a finger over the gap you’ve created. The light will still find its way to the sensor, but your finger will diffuse most of it, creating a softer light leak.Many lens whacking examples often have the camera free in the hands of the operator, which in most cases, causes shaky footage. I would recommend locking the camera down onto a tripod for a smoother shot. You can then delegate panning/tilting to another person while you take the sole focus of the lens whacking.If needed, you can also take lens whacking to the extreme, and cause mass blur and washout. Just remove both sides of the lens away from the body. I recently used this method to put emphasis on how dazed and confused a character was. He’s awoken after watching himself die, enough to cause confusion to anyone, I would imagine. The character is going to be in a state of confusion, and he’s not going to understand why he is alive.  To emphasize this, I removed the lens quite far away to completely wash out the image at points to add to his hysteria while he was coming around.Video Playerhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/pbblogassets/uploads/2016/09/Sequence-05_1.mp400:0000:0000:04Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Why Do It?The most important aspect of any filmmaking choice is asking, “Will this further the story?” Or, “Will this enhance the emotional impact?”If the answer is no, then at most times it’s probably best to ditch that idea. While lens whacking is extremely popular with music and fashion videos, it’s also ideal for many creative storytelling elements. Here’s a small list of scenarios where you can creatively implement the technique.The character has been poisoned.The character is under the influence of drugs.The character is disoriented.The character is dying.A dream sequence.A scene involving magic.A flashback.The list is almost endless; I’m sure there are many other creative applications to lens whacking that haven’t even crossed my mind. In the still below from Killing Them Softly by Andrew Dominik, the character is under the influence of drugs, and lens whacking (along with several other in-camera effects) has been applied to help portray his state.There are some considerations to take into account. This effect is, of course, in camera, and there’s no removing or “fixing” it if you change your mind later on. Test and practice the effect within your free time. If you have an important job coming up and think the lens whack effect may look great on a few shots, but you’re not 100% confident, have a look at a few digital elements you can use to help mimic the effect in post.Have you used lens whacking within your projects? Post your clips in the comment section below.last_img read more