January General Fund Revenues Positive; Transportation Fund Revenues again fall below projections

first_imgFY05 YTD General Fund January-05 January-06 Monthly Personal Income Taxreceipts, which are reported Net-of-Personal Income Tax refunds, exceededtarget by $3.61 million (or 4.6 %) in January.    Personal Income Tax Receipts, by far thelargest single state revenue source, were up 22.0% from January 2005.  Secretary Smith also noted that the CorporateIncome Tax performed well during January. The Corporate Income Tax exceeded target for the month (+$0.32 million, +12.6%).  PRESS RELEASE RHofmann State of Vermont 2 1 2005-02-08T20:28:00Z 2006-02-10T18:54:00Z 2006-02-10T18:54:00Z 1 777 4432 State of Vermont 36 10 5199 10.2625 Print MicrosoftInternetExplorer4st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”;}February 10, 2006 General Fund By Major Element (In Millions) Tax Component Among the other General Fundrevenue categories, Estate Tax receipts performed above the latest targets,finishing $1.68 million ahead of projections in January. FY06 YTD % Change Montpelier, VT – Secretary ofAdministration Michael K. Smith Announces January 2006 Revenue Results For TheState Of Vermont: January General Fund Revenues Positive; Transportation Fund Revenuesagain fall below projections.  Secretary of Administration MichaelK. Smith today released General Fund revenue results for the month of January,the seventh month of fiscal year 2006. General Fund revenues totaled $135.20 million for January 2006, $5.66million or 4.4% more than the $129.49 million consensus revenue target for themonth.  January results were also $16.26million (or +13.7%) higher than the solid General Fund revenues in January 2005.  Year to date, General Fund revenues totaled $656.64million.  Secretary Smith noted, We wererelieved to once again exceed our newly revised General Fund target for themonth.  It is important to note that the higherthan anticipated revenues in January were largely due to above target receiptsin both Personal and Corporate Income Tax revenues.  The monthly targets reflect the most recentfiscal year 2006 Consensus Revenue Forecast that was agreed to by the EmergencyBoard on January 11, 2006.  The States Consensus Revenue Forecast isupdated two times per year in January and July.  The Sales and Use Tax surpassedprojections for January (+$0.70 million or +2.6%).  Receipts in the Rooms and Meals Tax wereslightly above expectations as well (+$0.40 million or +0.4%).  Both figures reflect actual purchases inDecember, indicating a good holiday retailing season for the state, commentedSmith. % Changelast_img read more

Albert C. DeCiccio Named Provost at Southern Vermont College

first_imgAlbert C. DeCiccio, former Academic Dean of Rivier College in Nashua, N.H.,Named Provost at Southern Vermont College(Bennington, Vt.) — Southern Vermont College has selected Albert C. DeCiccio, the former Academic Dean of Rivier College, a Catholic liberal arts college in Nashua, N.H., to fill the newly created post of Provost. He assumed the position as the college’s Chief Academic Officer on July 7.DeCiccio earned his undergraduate degree at Merrimack College in 1974, his master’s degree in English from SUNY Albany, and his doctorate in English, Rhetoric and Composition from Arizona State University.”In Al DeCiccio, we have found a person with a remarkably wide range of talents,” SVC President Karen Gross said. “In addition to being a true scholar, he is deeply engaged in thinking about pedagogy and creative and thoughtful programmatic development. He is adept at helping others grow and learn, and he believes in small colleges and their capacity to change lives. SVC welcomes him to our community and looks forward to his wisdom, his good humor and his remarkable thoughtfulness. Students, faculty and staff will be enriched by the opportunity to work with him. The search committee, chaired by Professor Tom Redden, are to be commended for their efforts.”President Gross explained that the college replaced the position of Academic Dean with that of Provost in order to emphasize that “academic life is an institution’s primary asset an asset that must be nurtured and fostered each and every day. The chief academic officer must be an institution’s compelling and inspirational voice about the power and capacity of education, and must effectively engage students, faculty and the wider community in the enterprise of education expressed through a vision for the essential value of liberal arts colleges in the 21st century.”As Academic Dean for the past eight years, DeCiccio has been responsible for the development of all graduate and undergraduate liberal arts, sciences and professional studies programs at the 2,070-student college.Of the role of Provost, DeCiccio commented that “the Provost should establish the academic vision of the College for all constituencies, and broadcast that vision in the local civic community and, more nationally, in the higher education community. A Provost is very different from an Academic Dean, who is chiefly concerned with academic affairs and matters involving the faculty.”DeCiccio also explained that he is looking forward to coming to a small, liberal arts college, an environment where, as the first in his family to earn a college degree, he discovered the value of education.”I am a product of the small college, and I have thrived in that environment,” DeCiccio said. “Small, liberal arts colleges are staffed by faculty who love the classroom and the students in it from the first year through the last year. I am so pleased to have the chance to work with faculty who will take their roles seriously in the formation of their students.”Once he’s established in his new role, DeCiccio expects to teach classes himself.”I love to teach writing, fiction, writing center theory, rhetoric,” he said.And what advice does he give to students entering college? “The difference between high school and college is freedom, and the extent that students can negotiate that freedom, they will succeed in college,” he noted. “In high school, one learns how to find answers; in college, one learns how to ask questions.”In his spare time, he enjoys reading, live music, traveling and delving into the history of a place, but he’s also a sports fan.”I was thrilled with the Celtics winning the championship, but one of the great gifts of my life is to have seen the Red Sox win Two World Series,” he said.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing liberal arts education with 19 academic degree programs for approximately 450 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.last_img read more

Vermont and New York TV Stations Stick With Feb. 17 End of Analog Broadcasting

first_imgAlthough Congress has passed legislation to allow TV stations to extend their analog broadcasts until June, local stations in Vermont and northeastern New York plan to shut off analog broadcasts on the original deadline of midnight February 17. Stations WCAX (Channel 3), WFFF (Channel 44), WNNE (Channel 31), WPTZ (Channel 5), WVNY(Channel 22), Mountain Lake PBS (Channel 57) and Vermont Public Television (Channels 33, 20, 28 and 41) looked at the high level of readiness of the local market and the confusion a delay could bring and decided to stay with the February date.Jim Condon, executive director of the Vermont Association of Broadcasters, said, The extension of the analog shutoff will be a great help to viewers in parts of the country that are not ready. Here in Vermont, after more than a year of helping local viewers prepare for the end of analog broadcasting, we know that most of our local viewers are ready. Cable and satellite companies have done their part; stores have maintained a good supply of digital converter boxes, and station staff have helped thousands of viewers individually.The stations will continue working one on one with viewers who need assistance, up to and after the end of analog broadcasting. Stations will also staff a special DTV Help Line at Vermont Public Television where people can get help after the shutoff of analog signals. The toll-free number for that line will be announced at the time of the shutoff.Viewers are welcome to contact the stations at:WCAX (802) 652-6300, www.wcax.com(link is external)WFFF (802) 660-9333, www.FOX44.net(link is external)WPTZ/WNNE (518) 561-5555 (NY) or (802) 655-5455 (VT), www.wptz.com(link is external)WVNY (802) 660-9333, www.abc22.com(link is external)Mountain Lake PBS (518) 563-9770, www.mountainlake.org(link is external)Vermont Public Television 1-800-639-7811, www.vpt.org(link is external)last_img read more

Governor Douglas awards $750,000 grant for major renovation project in Springfield

first_imgGovernor Douglas today announced that the State of Vermont will be contributing $750,000 in grant funds to a major redevelopment project in Springfield. The grant, made available through the Vermont Community Development Program, will help repair sections of the former Fellows Gear Shaper/PVDC facility in downtown Springfield.   The property, largely vacant for several years, is being redeveloped by One Hundred River Street, LLC.“This award will not only help mitigate blighted areas of the former Fellows property, but also pave the way for new job creation, as well as restore an important part of Springfield’s historic downtown,” the Governor said. “This revitalization project is a perfect example of Vermont’s commitment to redeveloping its downtowns and villages as centers of social and commercial activity.”Officials from One Hundred River Street, LLC, anticipate having a significant portion of the site demolition work completed before winter. Once renovations are completed, officials anticipate that the building will be used for office, light industrial and retail space.“The Town of Springfield and the State of Vermont have been vital in assisting us throughout this project and these funds will help us address restoration issues on the site immediately,” said Rick Genderson, who along with John Meekin, is a principal of One Hundred River Street, LLC. Source: Governor’s office. 9.18.2009###last_img read more

New report ranks Vermont third in nation in overall child health and well-being

first_imgVermont ranks third nationally in overall child health and well-being in the 2010 KIDS COUNT Data Book, a state-by-state study on the well-being of America’s children. Vermont ranks in the top ten on eight of the ten individual indicators affecting child well-being that are reported in the Data Book. Vermont improved on five of the ten measures since 2000. New Hampshire ranked first and Minnesota was second. Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi ranked the lowest.Vermont’s success in these national rankings is not luck or magic – it is the result of forward-thinking policies and years of investment in programs and services that have helped kids and families thrive (REPORT). “Our strong showing relative to other states in the nation demonstrates how our public policies and effective support systems are making a difference in improving the lives of Vermont’s children and families,” said Carlen Finn, Executive Director of Voices for Vermont’s Children.The Data Book also demonstrates the importance of using timely and reliable data to guide us in our decisions about how to use public resources effectively to meet the needs of Vermont’s children and families. Data on child well-being help us measure the impact of public services and systems, and help us hold each other collectively accountable for the healthy development of children.In conjunction with today’s release of the 2010 KIDS COUNT Data Book, Voices for Vermont’s Children is releasing its statewide and county-level data pages, an electronic resource for tracking indicators of child health and well-being in the state of Vermont.To access this data, visit Vermont’s KIDS COUNT on the Voices for Vermont’s Children website. Visitors will encounter a map of Vermont; each county on the map links to a two-page report on select economic and health statistics. These statistics include child poverty rates, free and reduced lunch participation, prenatal care for pregnant women, and results from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The reports track changes to rates over time and compare the particular county’s rates to the overall state rates.“These county data give us a richer picture of how children and families are faring in different parts of Vermont. They show that while a majority of our kids are doing well, an increasing number are growing up in conditions that make it difficult for them to prosper and thrive. Now more than ever, Vermonters and their children need support from state and local systems and services designed to mitigate the worst effects of this recession and get people back on their feet,” said Nicole Mace, Research Coordinator at Voices for Vermont’s Children.Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation. 7.27.2010last_img read more

JDK to design global brand development platform for Woolrich

first_imgWoolrich, the Original Outdoor Clothing Company®, will partner with Jager di Paola Kemp Design (JDK) of Burlington, Vermont, to create and implement a global brand development strategy.  JDK’s collaboration with Woolrich will key on the development of an international brand platform for the iconic American apparel maker.Founded in 1988, JDK’s design driven branding approach and proprietary Living Brand® strategy has garnered them international recognition as a leader in the discipline.  The Living Brand process reveals the core ideas behind a brand, while the emotional, rational, and cultural aspects of the brand are also taken under consideration. JDK’s work includes development of creative and distinctive branding strategies for a wide range of brands including Burton Snowboards, Levi Strauss, Champion Paper, and Microsoft Xbox 360.”Any brand with real substance recognizes that you become what you believe, as a brand and as a culture. Woolrich has believed in the substance and meaning of the beauty and power of wool for nearly two centuries,” said Michael Jager, President/CEO at Jager Di Paola Kemp Design. “Woolrich, just hearing the name ignites memories and meaning that resonates from the past, to the present and into the future and we are honored to collaborate with the global Woolrich team.”Woolrich, founded in 1830, is surging right now with its classic designs and the popularity of the Americana and heritage trends.  Additionally, the buffalo check design, synonymous with the brand, has been a key element to the brand’s recent successes thanks to the plaid trend of the past few seasons.  Building on these themes and successes, Woolrich recently introduced its Fall 2011 collections for which it received resounding approval from its retail partners and the media.Globally, the Woolrich brand is marketed by Woolrich and its licensing partners.  The company’s core apparel business is marketed under five distinct collections consisting of the Woolrich Outdoor Collection, Woolrich John Rich and Bros., Woolrich Woolen Mills, Woolrich Penn Rich, and Woolrich Elite Tactical Series.”With increasing demand for Woolrich in a broad variety of demographics and markets, it’s essential that our brand platform be clear, focused, and ready to support both current and future demand,” said Brian Mangione, Woolrich Executive Vice President.About Woolrich®Woolrich Inc., the Original Outdoor Clothing Company, is an authentic American brand that embraces an outdoor lifestyle. Trusted since 1830 by generations of loyal consumers, Woolrich continues its tradition of providing quality products for today’s outdoor enthusiast. A brand recognized worldwide, Woolrich product offerings include functional, comfortable and durable men’s and women’s sportswear and outerwear using innovative fabrications for the ultimate in performance capabilities, well-designed home and outdoor living products, and licensed accessory products. In 2010, Woolrich celebrated its 180th Anniversary. It is the original and longest continuously-operating outdoor apparel manufacturer and woolen mill in the United States. Find out more at www.woolrich.com(link is external).About Jager Di Paola Kemp DesignJDK is a design-driven multi-disciplinary studio based in Burlington, Vermont, with satellite spaces in New York City and Portland, Oregon.  JDK’s practice includes brand strategy, product design, identity, packaging, visual merchandising, advertising, Web sites, marketing collateral, and branded environments. JDK is the originator of Living Brand® strategy, a proprietary approach that guides brand design. Active clients include Burton Snowboards, Giant Bicycles, Intrawest’s Stratton Mountain Resort, Microsoft’s Xbox game console and Zune media player, Seventh Generation household products, SRAM Corporation, Virgin Mobile, and Wolverine World Wide’s Merrell and licensed Patagonia brands. More information on JDK can be found at its Web site, jdk.com.SOURCE Woolrich Inc. WOOLRICH, Pa., March 29, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

Second annual Dan Bonfigli Woody Classic serves-off on August 11

first_imgDealer.com,Next Thursday (August 11th) Burlington’s Dealer.com will be hosting the second annual Woody Classic ‘ a local tennis match and celebration open to the public. As a neat throw-back to the 70’s and 80’s, competitors are required to use wooden racquets and dress in retro-style athletic gear. In addition, the event will culminate with a ‘Sunday Bash’ where families are encouraged to attend and enjoy the food and free activities while cheering on the finalists (who are competing for prizes valued at more than $4,500).  WHAT:                 Tennis athletes and fans are invited to dust-off their headbands and travel back to the era of John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg’s classic rivalry by participating in the second annual Dan Bonfigli Woody Classic ‘ a local tennis competition requiring athletes to use wooden racquets and show off their retro-style sportswear in honor of the heyday of 1970’s and 1980’s tennis.                                 The four-day competitive tennis match will culminate with a ‘Sunday Bash,’ where food, beverages and family activities will be available for athletes and spectators throughout the day as finalists compete. During the bash, more than $4,500 in prizes will be awarded to top competitors ‘ and additional awards will be given to best male and female athlete who replicate the “Classic White” tennis outfits from the 70’s and 80’s. Athletes can register for singles and doubles categories for both men and women.  Spectators are encouraged to cheer-on athletes throughout the competition – cow bells and noise makers will be provided! For more information, and to register by midnight on August 8th, visit www.woodyclassic.com(link is external). WHO:                   The 2nd Annual Dan Bonfigli Woody Classic is sponsored by the Burlington Tennis Club and Dealer.com, the Burlington-based global leader in online marketing solutions for the automotive industry WHEN:                 Registration: Now until August 8thCompetition: August 11 ‘ 14, 2011 (visit www.woodyclassic.com(link is external) for info)Sunday Bash, semi and final matches: August 14 (all day)Awards Ceremony: August 14 (all day) WHERE:               Burlington Tennis Club12 East TerraceSouth Burlington, VT 05403(802) 863-3439                                Click for Map WHY:                    The event is hosted by Dealer.com in memory of Dan Bonfigli, a local tennis athlete whose unrealized dream was to create a competition like the Woody Classic ‘ where retro-era tennis was celebrated in a fun and friendly competition. ‘Last year was so much fun, we just had to do it again,’ said Mark Bonfigli, CEO and founder of Dealer.com, and brother of Dan Bonfigli. ‘We’re all looking forward to another year of friendly competition, family fun and outrageous throwbacks to the 70’s and 80’s era of tennis.’last_img read more

VHCB’s Farm Viability Program helps farmers increase profits, expand, diversify

first_imgFarmers around the state are benefiting from in-depth, one-on-one business planning services provided by the Vermont Farm Viability Program. Since 2003, the program, which is administered by the Vermont Housing & Conservation Board, has enrolled more than 375 farmers and ag-related businesses, providing on-farm business and financial planning as well as technical assistance ranging from veterinary services to marketing consultants. The program can help farmers to solidify their business skills, examine their farm’s profitability, plan for an expansion or diversification, transfer the farm to a new generation, and more.Agency of Agriculture Secretary Chuck Ross said, ‘The Farm Viability Program is making a real difference for farmers across the spectrum’from dairy to beef to vegetable farms and for value-added producers like cheese makers’this program is giving farmers the benefit of an inside look at business planning decisions that can increase profits.  As a result, farms are expanding, diversifying, and hiring help’all good indicators for the industry and for Vermont’s economy.’                  Among the farms that have enrolled in the program are Millborne Farm in Shoreham, a dairy farm also producing yogurt drinks, Stony Pond Farm in Fairfield, where Tyler and Melanie Webb specialize in dairy and beef, and Bread and Roses Farm, a vegetable farm run by Westford native Chris Siegriest.Millborne Farm: Gert and Arda Schut operate Millborne Farm in Shoreham. They moved to Shoreham in 1999 by way of their homeland, the Netherlands, where they felt hindered from starting their own farm by a quota system. They farmed in Connecticut for 10 years before moving to Vermont and building up their herd to 160 cows. The Schuts began thinking about diversification in the early 2000s and enlisted the help of UVM’s Food and Nutrition Department to develop a drinkable yogurt, which they began to produce on the farm in 2005, using milk from their own herd.The yogurt business grew, but slowly, and in 2009 the Schuts enrolled in the Farm Viability Program to work with Al Curler, a consultant with UVM Extension, to develop a marketing plan for the yogurt. Following development of the plan, the Schuts were successful in expanding their drinkable yogurt operation tenfold’they are now utilizing 30,000 pounds of their own milk each week to make their own product and two other yogurt drink products packaged for private labels. A $6,000 implementation grant from the Farm Viability Program in 2010 matched with their own funds enabled the Schuts to purchase an additional processing tank and a large walk-in cooler to help them expand their value-added enterprise. Producing their own yogurt has allowed the Schuts to operate at a profit and provide employment for seven people while also helping them weather downturns in milk prices.      Stony Pond Farm: Stony Pond Farm in Fairfield is a small dairy and beef operation established in 2004 by Tyler and Melanie Webb. Tyler enrolled with the Farm Viability Program in 2005 to produce a business plan for the young farm, giving the couple a solid understanding of how to get their operation off to a sound start. Since then, the Webbs have established a very successful farm business specializing in dairy and beef cows. Using their business plan, the Webbs are refining and improving their operation as they continue to consider diversification strategies for the future.Since completion of their business plan, Stony Pond Farm has been awarded two implementation grants. A grant of $6,000 was awarded in 2009 and allowed for construction of a hoop house for their growing herd of cows. With the latest implementation grant of $3,500, Webb is finishing construction of a new, multi-purpose farm building. While sales at the farmers market and beef sales to wholesale accounts are booming, soon local customers will be able to purchase beef right on the farm. Now, with a central location for on-farm sales, Webb can increase his business potential and also be in a position to accommodate future value-added farm products. On Saturdays, the Tyler and Melanie can be found grilling their wildly popular grilled hamburgers at the Burlington Farmers Market!Bread and Roses Farm: At Bread and Roses Farm, Westford native Chris Siegriest and Laura Williams lease acreage between the Westford Green and the Lamoille River where they grow vegetables under the community supported agriculture (CSA) model. They have grown the business to offer 70 full-sized shares and they remain the only CSA in Westford. Additionally, the farmers have a strong social mission: they produce vegetables to fill 50 smaller shares for residents at a local senior housing development and offer subsidized shares through donations from other shareholders and a cost-share agreement with NOFA-VT. Chris and Laura completed a business plan with the Farm Viability Program in 2010, working with staff at the Intervale Center. According to Chris, ‘The Program was incredibly helpful for our business, especially in financial planning and analysis. Mark [Canella] helped walk us through our first loan, so we could establish a line of credit for the business which we used to purchase a bed shaper.’In 2010, Chris and Laura applied for an implementation grant from the Farm Viability Program. An award of $3,000, matched with their own funds, helped them purchase a cultivation tractor. Chris erected a greenhouse in 2010-2011 that is now pumping out vegetables that were spared exposure to the heavy rains this spring when many direct-seeded crops were lost.The Vermont Farm Viability Program works with private consultants and service providers such as the University of Vermont, The Intervale Center and NOFA-VT to deliver services. To produce a written business plan, farmers enrolled in the Farm Viability Program meet and work together with a consultant for approximately one year. In the second year, the program provides additional technical assistance and help updating the business plan. The business planning process involves the farmer in an assessment of the farm operation’s strengths and weaknesses and in an exploration of possible management changes to increase profits and meet production goals. Examples include consultations on keeping better production or financial records, financial benchmark analysis, meetings with crop or animal health specialists, new product enterprise analysis, estate and farm transfer planning, labor management, and value-added processing. Farmers who have completed business plans with the program are eligible for grants towards capital expenses or additional technical support to implement the business plan, when funding is available.The Farm Viability Program accepts applications quarterly, with the next upcoming deadline on September 30. To request an application, call 828-3370 or visit the website, www.vhcb.org/viability.html(link is external). Funded by the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, the Farm Viability Program is a collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets with funding assistance provided by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA Rural Development and private foundations, including the John Merck Fund.last_img read more

Weekly unemployment claims increase for second week

first_imgThere were 882 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance last week. This is an increase of 130 from the week before, as new claims increased again following a decline in the aftermath of  Tropical Storm Irene. In looking at the table below, you will see that the summer’s historically low claims came to an abrupt end with the storm. While the numbers are considerably lower than the Irene spike numbers, they have been, for the last couple of weeks, nearly double the initial claims observed in July and August. Altogether 5,946 new and continuing claims were filed, an increase of 50 from a week ago, but 2,112 fewer than a year ago. The Department also processed 1,494 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 66 more than a week ago. In addition, there were 701 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is 12 more than the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)  Vermont’s unemployment rate fell one-tenth in September to 5.8 percent. See story HERE.    See Table and graphs below weekly data.Vermont Labor Force StatisticsSeasonally Adjusted Change to         September 2011 from    September  2011 August  2011 September  2010 August  2011 September  2010 center_img Total Labor Force362,100359,800360,1002,3002,000  Employment340,900338,800338,8002,1002,100  Unemployment21,10021,10021,3000-200  Rate5.8%5.9%5.9%-0.1-0.1last_img read more